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Michael Stipe

Michael Stipe

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Color Of A Brisk And Leaping Day... Superb black-and-white photography highlights this independent drama. John Lee... more info $26.95was $26.95 Buy Now

Also Known As: Michael Valentine, John Michael Stipe Died:
Born: January 4, 1960 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Decatur, Georgia, USA Profession: producer, musician, songwriter, photographer, restaurateur, busboy

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

The frontman and chief co-lyricist for the alternative rock giants R.E.M. for over 30 years, Michael Stipe influenced a generation of musicians and artists with his poetic songs, which included such hits as "Fall On Me," "The One I Love," "Stand" and "Losing My Religion," as well as his kinetic, androgynous stage presence. He formed the band in the creative cauldron of the Athens, GA music scene of the late 1970s, and with guitarist/co-writer Peter Buck, bassist Mike Mills and drummer Bill Berry, helped to create the blueprint for the indie rock scene of the next three decades. Stipe's music and lyrics, at once impenetrable and heartfelt, became gospel for fans and performers alike who followed the band through its breakout years in the late 1980s and shift to major label status, which minted them as true superstars in the early 1990s. Declining sales and the departure of Berry mid-decade began to turn the tide on R.E.M.'s fortunes by the late '90s, during which Stipe developed a second career as a producer on such films as "Being John Malkovich" (1999). Stipe, Buck and Mills soldiered on with the band until 2011, when they parted company while expressing their gratitude to fans who had grown up with...

The frontman and chief co-lyricist for the alternative rock giants R.E.M. for over 30 years, Michael Stipe influenced a generation of musicians and artists with his poetic songs, which included such hits as "Fall On Me," "The One I Love," "Stand" and "Losing My Religion," as well as his kinetic, androgynous stage presence. He formed the band in the creative cauldron of the Athens, GA music scene of the late 1970s, and with guitarist/co-writer Peter Buck, bassist Mike Mills and drummer Bill Berry, helped to create the blueprint for the indie rock scene of the next three decades. Stipe's music and lyrics, at once impenetrable and heartfelt, became gospel for fans and performers alike who followed the band through its breakout years in the late 1980s and shift to major label status, which minted them as true superstars in the early 1990s. Declining sales and the departure of Berry mid-decade began to turn the tide on R.E.M.'s fortunes by the late '90s, during which Stipe developed a second career as a producer on such films as "Being John Malkovich" (1999). Stipe, Buck and Mills soldiered on with the band until 2011, when they parted company while expressing their gratitude to fans who had grown up with and had been inspired by their music and message. For his part, Stipe's best work with R.E.M. represented a freedom of expression and sound that left an indelible imprint on the shape of popular music.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

3.
 1 Giant Leap (2002)
4.
 Olive the Other Reindeer (1999) Voice Of Schnitzel
5.
 Anthem (1997) Himself
6.
7.
 RoadMovie (1996) Himself
8.
 Arena Brains (1987) The Watcher
10.
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
As a child lived on an army base in Germany
:
By age eight, was playing the guitar, the accordian and the piano
1975:
Formed band Bad Habits, while still in high school
:
While attending the University of Georgia, met musicians Peter Buck, Mike Mills and Bill Berry and formed the band R.E.M.
1980:
Dropped out of school to pursue music full time; played first live gig
1981:
R.E.M. released first single "Radio Free Europe"
1982:
R.E.M. released debut EP "Chronic Town"; signed with IRS Records
1987:
First Top Ten charting single for R.E.M. "The One I Love"
:
With partner director Jim McKay formed C-00 (C-Hundred) Films Corp. to produce music videos, documentaries, short films, PSAs and features
1988:
C-00 took on its first official production with the politically charged video for the R.E.M. single "Talk About the Passion"
1988:
R.E.M. signed to major recording deal with Warner Bros.
1989:
Major label debut for R.E.M., the platinum selling album "Green", on Warner Bros. Records
1991:
R.E.M. released "Out of Time", the album featuring the celebrated breakthrough single "Losing My Religion"
1991:
Played ice cream man Captain Scrummy in Nickelodeon's comedy special "The Adventures of Pete and Pete: What We Did On Our Summer Vacation"
:
Formed the independent film production company Single Cell Pictures
1994:
Single Cell Pictures signed a two-year deal with New Line Cinema; no films actually produced
1996:
Acted in Christopher Munch's "Color of a Brisk and Leaping Day"; screened at Sundance Film Festival
1997:
Single Cell Pictures signed a two-year development deal with October Films that included a partnership between October and Warner Bros. records for soundtrack album production and distribution
1997:
Drummer Bill Berry left R.E.M.
1998:
Released the photographic documentary book "Two Times Intro: On the Road with Patti Smith"
1998:
As part of C-00, produced the Student Academy Award-winning short "Tree Shade", directed by Lisa Collins
1998:
Was executive producer of Todd Haynes' glam rock fairy tale "Velvet Goldmine"
1999:
The documentary "This Way Up: R.E.M.", chronicling the band's work on their album "Up", aired on Bravo
1999:
Was a producer (with Single Cell) of celebrated music video director Spike Jonze's feature directorial debut "Being John Malkovich"
1999:
With C-00, co-produced Chris Smith's acclaimed documentary "American Movie"
1999:
R.E.M. released the soundtrack to Milos Forman's Andy Kaufman biopic "Man on the Moon", the film named after group's 1992 song tribute to the late comedian
2000:
With C-00, produced the drama "Spring Forward", starring Ned Beatty and Liev Schreiber; premiered at the Sundance Film Festival
2000:
Co-produced "Our Song", a Crown Heights, Brooklyn-set drama writen, directed and produced by Jim McKay; premiered at Sundance Film Festival
2000:
In April, formed Self Timer, a production company that served as parent to both C-00 (C-Hundred) Film and Single Cell Pictures; in June signed three-year, first-look deal with United Artists Films
2001:
Served as executive producer of "13 Conversations About One Thing"; screened at Toronto International Film Festival; shown at 2002 Sundance Film Festival before its US theatrical release
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Education

Collinsville High School: Collinsville , Illinois -
University of Georgia: Athens , Georgia -

Notes

"I'm really interested in making feature films, and I have the unique advantage, I think in Hollywood, of not wanting to direct or act. And I'm really very motivated by being in the company of creative people. And I think that outside of the stagnant blockbuster Hollywood world, there are probably a lot of people who are trying to get movies made who are really amazing. To me it's like punk rock in '78, it's really exciting." --Stipe on moving into film producing, quoted in US, December 1994.

Stipe on meeting with potential studio backers for his independent film production project: "Whether or not they knew the music didn't matter. I was a young pop icon who could bring an 'edgy', 'gritty', 'Gen X' feel. The word 'edgy' got thrown around a lot. I've been tagged with 'eccentric' and 'enigmatic' for so long--any E word like that, I automatically send up the red flag." --quoted in Entertainment Weekly, July 14, 1995.

Answering the assertion that he may be leaving music behind for films: "I'm very happy producing [movies] and helping other people do what they do best, but I feel no need to move into acting or even directing. It's never been a passion of mine, whereas photography and music always have been." --Stipe quoted in Time Out New York, May 7-14, 1998.

Stipe, in an interview promoting the Independent Film Channel's IndieRocks Film Festival, drawing parallels between the aesthetics of independent film and punk rock: "They're taking something, shattering it and rebuilding it in a new way. Even something like 'Even Cowgirls Get the Blues', which doesn't have much to do with punk rock. But the sheer balls to make a film out of a Tom Robbins book is pretty great." --quoted in Time Out New York, November 4-11, 1999.

Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Jane Pratt. Magazine editor. Dated briefly.

Family close complete family listing

sister:
Lynda Stipe.
sister:
Cindy Stipe.

Bibliography close complete biography

"Two Times Intro: On the Road with Patti Smith" Little, Brown

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