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Ron Satlof

Ron Satlof

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Prolific television director Ron Satlof broke into the industry in 1972, when his live-action short film "Frog Story" earned an Oscar nomination. In short order, he was serving as an assistant director under burgeoning New York filmmaker Martin Scorsese, while wading into television work as an associate producer. His work as a producer earned him an Emmy nomination in 1975 for the country-sheriff drama series "McCloud." Ultimately, Satlof chose to focus on directing. He built a name for himself in television, working in action-and-adventure-themed series like the live-action superhero drama "The Amazing Spider-Man," the stunt-packed lady detective show "Charlie's Angels," and the testosterone-fueled "The A-Team." After a long-established career in television with a clear leaning toward the crime genre, Satlof broke new ground in 2008 with "Misconceptions," a film he co-wrote and directed. This dramedy centered on a young conservative woman who decides to play surrogate to a biracial gay couple after God speaks to her. Despite its daring, "Misconceptions" failed to find an audience.

Prolific television director Ron Satlof broke into the industry in 1972, when his live-action short film "Frog Story" earned an Oscar nomination. In short order, he was serving as an assistant director under burgeoning New York filmmaker Martin Scorsese, while wading into television work as an associate producer. His work as a producer earned him an Emmy nomination in 1975 for the country-sheriff drama series "McCloud." Ultimately, Satlof chose to focus on directing. He built a name for himself in television, working in action-and-adventure-themed series like the live-action superhero drama "The Amazing Spider-Man," the stunt-packed lady detective show "Charlie's Angels," and the testosterone-fueled "The A-Team." After a long-established career in television with a clear leaning toward the crime genre, Satlof broke new ground in 2008 with "Misconceptions," a film he co-wrote and directed. This dramedy centered on a young conservative woman who decides to play surrogate to a biracial gay couple after God speaks to her. Despite its daring, "Misconceptions" failed to find an audience.

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