skip navigation
Edward Chodorov

Edward Chodorov

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Also Known As: Died: October 9, 1988
Born: April 17, 1904 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: New York City, New York, USA Profession: playwright, producer, screenwriter, publicity director, stage manager

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Edward Chodorov worked on a variety of projects during his entertainment career. Early on in his screenwriting career, Chodorov wrote dramatic scripts for "Captured" (1933) with Leslie Howard, "The Mayor of Hell" (1933) and "The World Changes" (1933). Chodorov continued to focus on film through the thirties, producing movies like "Sweet Adeline" (1935) with Irene Dunne, the dramatic adaptation "Rich Man, Poor Girl" (1938) with Robert Young and the drama "Tell No Tales" (1939) with Melvyn Douglas. Chodorov continued to exercise his talent in the forties and the fifties, taking on a mix of projects like "Undercurrent" (1946) starring Katharine Hepburn, "The Hucksters" (1947) starring Clark Gable and "Road House" with Ida Lupino (1948). His credits also expanded to "Kind Lady" (1951) starring Ethel Barrymore. Chodorov last wrote "Oh, Men! Oh, Women!" (1957) with Dan Dailey. Chodorov passed away in October 1988 at the age of 84.

Edward Chodorov worked on a variety of projects during his entertainment career. Early on in his screenwriting career, Chodorov wrote dramatic scripts for "Captured" (1933) with Leslie Howard, "The Mayor of Hell" (1933) and "The World Changes" (1933). Chodorov continued to focus on film through the thirties, producing movies like "Sweet Adeline" (1935) with Irene Dunne, the dramatic adaptation "Rich Man, Poor Girl" (1938) with Robert Young and the drama "Tell No Tales" (1939) with Melvyn Douglas. Chodorov continued to exercise his talent in the forties and the fifties, taking on a mix of projects like "Undercurrent" (1946) starring Katharine Hepburn, "The Hucksters" (1947) starring Clark Gable and "Road House" with Ida Lupino (1948). His credits also expanded to "Kind Lady" (1951) starring Ethel Barrymore. Chodorov last wrote "Oh, Men! Oh, Women!" (1957) with Dan Dailey. Chodorov passed away in October 1988 at the age of 84.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Education

Brown University: -

Family close complete family listing

brother:
Jerome Chodorov.

Contributions

TLS ( 2006-05-09 )

Source: The Stars of Hollywood Forever: 1901-2006

Edward entered the film industry as a publicity director for Columbia Pictures. In addition to writing screenplays, Edward also wrote fourteen stage plays and was often a guest at Louis B. Mayer's lunch table at the MGM Commissary. In 1953 he was blacklisted by the Hollywood studios after being identified as a Communist Party member by choreographer Jerome Robbins.

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute