skip navigation
Stockard Channing

Stockard Channing

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

 
 

Isn't She Great DVD Bette Midler writes her own ticket in "Isn't She Great" (2000), the hilarious... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

To Wong Foo, Thanks For Everything! Julie... How can you go wrong with great actors like Wesley Snipes, Patrick Swayze and... more info $9.99was $9.99 Buy Now

Batman Beyond: Season 3... As the new Batman, Terry has all the high-tech gear and gadgets he needs, plus... more info $26.98was $26.98 Buy Now

Must Love Dogs DVD The preschool teacher Sarah (Diane Lane) divorced from her beloved husband eight... more info $5.98was $5.98 Buy Now

Practical Magic DVD There's a little witch in every woman.Fun and excitement abound in the Owens... more info $5.98was $5.98 Buy Now

Perfect Witness DVD Owning a restaurant in the meat-packing district of New York, Sam Paxton (Aidan... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

Also Known As: Susan Williams Antonia Stockard Died:
Born: February 13, 1944 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: New York City, New York, USA Profession: actress

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Actress Stockard Channing's deceptively uneven film résumé belied the award-winning performer's exceptionally prolific and successful career on both stage and television. After a few brief appearances in feature films, Channing won what should have been the role of a lifetime opposite movie icons Warren Beatty and Jack Nicholson in the Mike Nichols comedy "The Fortune" (1975). But when that film - as well as the next few she appeared in - were commercial busts, her nascent movie career was already in decline. That is, until Channing was cast in the role of the bad-girl with a heart-of-gold, Rizzo, in the smash musical "Grease" (1978). The rollercoaster ride continued, however, when two television series met ignominious ends, and feature efforts like "The Fish That Saved Pittsburgh" (1979) were met with disdain. It was at this point that Channing returned to the stage and enjoyed a series of indisputable successes, with turns in "A Day in the Death of Joe Egg" in 1985, for which she won a Tony Award. Channing was also nominated for an Academy Award for her role in the film "Six Degrees of Separation" (1993), an adaptation of the play she had starred in three years prior. More recognition came...

Actress Stockard Channing's deceptively uneven film résumé belied the award-winning performer's exceptionally prolific and successful career on both stage and television. After a few brief appearances in feature films, Channing won what should have been the role of a lifetime opposite movie icons Warren Beatty and Jack Nicholson in the Mike Nichols comedy "The Fortune" (1975). But when that film - as well as the next few she appeared in - were commercial busts, her nascent movie career was already in decline. That is, until Channing was cast in the role of the bad-girl with a heart-of-gold, Rizzo, in the smash musical "Grease" (1978). The rollercoaster ride continued, however, when two television series met ignominious ends, and feature efforts like "The Fish That Saved Pittsburgh" (1979) were met with disdain. It was at this point that Channing returned to the stage and enjoyed a series of indisputable successes, with turns in "A Day in the Death of Joe Egg" in 1985, for which she won a Tony Award. Channing was also nominated for an Academy Award for her role in the film "Six Degrees of Separation" (1993), an adaptation of the play she had starred in three years prior. More recognition came Channing's way when she played First Lady Abigail Bartlet to Martin Sheen's U.S. President on the hit political drama "The West Wing" (NBC, 1999-2006). The actresses' initial appearance on the show proved so popular that producers quickly added her to the regular cast. It was a wise decision, as Channing went on to receive several Emmy nominations for the role, winning in 2002. As the decade drew to a close, Channing remained one of the most active - and most welcome - presences in film and on stage and television.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Pulling Strings (2013)
2.
3.
4.
 Sparkle (2007)
5.
 Must Love Dogs (2005) Cast
6.
 Home of the Brave (2004) Narrator
7.
 Jack (2004) Anne
8.
 Anything Else (2003) Paula
9.
 Behind the Red Door (2003) Julia
10.
 Bright Young Things (2003) Mrs Melrose Ape
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
First stage appearance as Pirate Jenny in the Harvard University production of "The Threepenny Opera"
1966:
Became a member of the Theater Company of Boston; first professional appearance in "The Investigation"
1969:
Made off-Broadway debut with Theatre Company of Boston in "Adaptation/Next"
1971:
Made Broadway debut in "Two Gentlemen of Verona"; first association with playwright John Guare
1971:
Delivered only one line as a nurse in her first film "The Hospital"
1973:
First lead role, the television movie "The Girl Most Likely to..." (ABC) written by Joan Rivers
1975:
Co-starred with Warren Beatty and Jack Nicholson in Mike Nichols' "The Fortune"
1976:
Performed in the Los Angeles stage production of "Vanities" with Sandy Duncan and Lucie Arnaz
1978:
Landed the memorable role of Rizzo, leader of the Pink Ladies, in the film adaptation of the musical "Grease"
1979:
Starred in first TV series "Stockard Channing in Just Friends" (CBS)
1979:
Played the title role in the true-life CBS movie "Silent Victory: The Kitty O'Neil Story"
1980:
Returned to series TV for the short-lived "The Stockard Channing Show" (CBS)
1982:
Played Sheila the distraught mother in the Connecticut stage production of "A Day in the Death of Joe Egg"
1984:
Succeeded Liza Minnelli in the Kander and Ebb musical "The Rink" on Broadway
1985:
Won a Tony for reprising the role of Sheila in "A Day in the Death of Joe Egg" on Broadway
1986:
Re-teamed with Nicholson and Nichols for the film "Heartburn"
1986:
Played Bunny Flingus in John Guare's "House of Blue Leaves"; earned a Tony nomination for Featured Actress in a Play
1987:
Earned an Emmy nomination for her supporting role in "Echoes in the Darkness" (CBS)
1989:
Received second Emmy nomination for her supporting role in the "Perfect Witness" (HBO)
1990:
Won acclaim for her performance as Ouisa Kittredge in Guare's "Six Degrees of Separation"; appeared in both the off and on Broadway productions
1992:
Acted in Guare's "Four Baboons Adoring the Sun" at the Lincoln Center Theater
1993:
Reprised role of Ouisa Kittredge for the film version of "Six Degrees of Separation"; received first Best Actress Oscar nomination
1993:
Garnered third Emmy nomination for her guest role as a minister's wife in the Disney Channel series "Avonlea"
1995:
Appeared as an abused wife who befriends three drag queens in "To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar"
1995:
Played Harvey Keitel's old flame Ruby in Wayne Wang's "Smoke"
1995:
Returned to Lincoln Center to appear in the off-Broadway production of Tom Stoppard's "Hapgood"
1996:
Played one of the title roles in the HBO movie, "Edie & Pen"
1996:
Landed cameo role as the wife whose suicide brings together the members (including Bette Midler, Diane Keaton and Goldie Hawn) of "The First Wives Club"
1996:
Starred as Barbara Whitney in the acclaimed USA Network film "An Unexpected Family"; earned fourth Emmy nomination
1997:
Returned to Broadway starring in the Lincoln Center revival of "The Little Foxes"
1998:
Played the former lover of Paul Newman in "Twilight"
1998:
Portrayed Rachel Luckman in the Showtime movie "The Baby Dance"; received fifth career Emmy nomination
1998:
Reprised role of Barbara Whitney in the sequel "An Unexpected Life" (USA Network)
1999:
Portrayed Eleanor of Aquitaine opposite Laurence Fishburne's King Henry II in the Broadway revival of "The Lion in Winter"; received Tony nomination
1999:
Joined the cast of NBC's political drama "The West Wing" in the recurring role of the First Lady; role made regular as of 2001; received Emmy (2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005) and SAG (2004) nominations for Best Supporting Actress
2001:
Cast as a psychiatrist in the Showtime miniseries "A Girl Thing"
2002:
Played Cinderella's stepmother in the revisionist ABC movie "Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister"
2002:
Portrayed Judy Shepard in the NBC movie "The Matthew Shepard Story"
2005:
Cast opposite Diane Lane and Christopher Plummer in "Must Love Dogs"
2006:
Earned an Emmy nomination for the short-lived CBS series "Out of Practice"
2006:
Co-starred in "3 Needles," one of three short stories about the global HIV pandemic directed by Thom Fitzgerald
2008:
Narrated the Animal Planet hit series "Meerkat Manor"
2008:
Returned to Broadway for the musical "Pal Joey"; earned a Tony Award nomination for Best Actress in a Musical
2010:
Returned to the stage, playing Lady Bracknell in Rough Magic Theatre Company¿s production of Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest"
2011:
Co-starred with Rachel Griffiths, Stacy Keach, and Judith Light in the critically acclaimed play "Other Desert Cities" on Broadway
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Chapin School: New York , New York -
The Madeira School: McLean , Virginia -
Radcliffe College: Cambridge , Massachusetts - 1965
Radcliffe College: Cambridge , Massachusetts - 1965

Notes

"I can only act. I tried to give it up years ago but I couldn't do it. I can't do anything else, really. I wouldn't know what to do in an office. It's too late now, anyway. Most people, when they go to work, they go an office and sit there and do things I would have no idea of how to do. I can't type. I can't write a letter. I'm absolutely ignorant in many ways that everyubody takes for granted."---Stockard Channing, quoted in Movieline, 1991.

"What I love about the theater is the moment of absolute solitude you have in the dark. You're going to walk out of the dark into the light. And something's going to happen."---Stockard Channing, quoted in New York, October 22, 1990.

"I was brought up in a very conventional background to be the sort of woman who marries some guy with money and has the house and the kids in prep schools and lives this very protected life. On the other hand, I went off and joined the circus."---Channing quoted in The New York Times, March 6, 1994.

"I went to Texas to do 'Lily Dale' (Showtime, 1996), a Horton Foote movie ... Horton, whom I'd never met, had these understandable qualms about this northern person playing his grandmother. Well, I got down to Texas and this voice came out of me. Horton said, 'What's that voice? Where are you from?' It was a voice so far out of my past."

"'Lily Dale' put me back to that lost part of my childhood. My young mother and my old father would go off on business trips and send my sister Lesly and me down to Pensacola to stay with Aunt Lucy, born in the 1880s, who had raised my father. I was the kind of kid who imitated everybody, the family clown, the storyteller. 'Lily Dale' opened up some deep part of me that remembered those voices, and when that film was over, I didn't want to let that go." Then came 'Little Foxes', set inland of Mobile. "Now you have to know that Pensacola is just over the border from Mobile."---Stockard Channing to John Guare in New York, April 21, 1997.

"I never went to drama school or anything. I just started working on the stage and learning from experience. I don't think I was always very good. I didn't have mentors; I could have used a couple. But you have to respect every possible way that performers achieve what they achieve. All that matters is what's on the stage--telling the story, moving people, making them laugh. That's what the job is. I don't care if it's about the hat you wear, or if you have to drink a bottle of Scotch to do it. Everyone should have their own thing, and how they get there is their own problem to solve. I do think there is snobbery about this."---Stockard Channing quoted in InTheater, April 12, 1999.

"I'm not in competition with my past. I was never a star. I don't bring a lot of 'stuff' with me, which may be an advantage. I have others ... I don't worry about being a has-been because I've already been one."---Channing on her successful career, told TV Guide, March 15-22, 2002.

"Stockard never has a complaint, never makes excuses, never frets about age or shape or typecasting or anything of that nature. She's just a classic dame, a great broad."---"The West Wing" co-star Martin Sheen quoted in TV Guide, March 15-22, 2002.

On December 14, 2004, Stockard Channing was arrested for investigation of drunken driving after she tried to drive around a roadblock. She was charged with two misdemeanor counts of driving while under the influence of alcohol

Companions close complete companion listing

husband:
Walter Channing Jr. Business executive, venture capitalist, sculptor. Married in 1963; divorced in 1967.
husband:
Paul Schmidt. Actor, playwright, professor. Professor of Slavic Languages, Univeristy of Texas; several years her senior; married in 1970; divorced in 1975.
husband:
David Debin. Screenwriter, producer. Married in 1976; divorced in 1980; producer of Channing's "The Stockard Channing Show" (1980).
husband:
David Rawle. Business executive. Married in 1982; divorced in 1988; had met in college; from Charleston, South Carolina.
companion:
Daniel Gillham. Director of photography, gaffer. Met in 1986 on set of "A Time of Destiny" (1988); first film as director of photography, Dan McCormack's "Minotaur"; together since 1988.
VIEW COMPLETE COMPANION LISTING

Family close complete family listing

father:
Lester Napier Stockard. Business executive. Shipping magnate; self-made man from the South; dropped out of school in the sixth grade; joined Eddie Rickenbacker's squadron in WWI; was divorced when married to Channing's mother; died in 1950.
mother:
Mary Alice Stockard. From a large Irish-Catholic family in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn.
sister:
Lesly Stockard Smith. Became mayor of Palm Beach in 2000.

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute