skip navigation
Jackie Chan

Jackie Chan

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

 
 

Rush Hour 2 DVD It's vacation time for det. James carter and he finds himself alongside det. Lee... more info $5.98was $5.98 Buy Now

Shanghai Knights DVD Jackie Chan kicks butt in this riotous action adventure. In the late 1880s,... more info $6.25was $6.25 Buy Now

The Medallion DVD Though it's an English-language film, the fantasy action comedy The Medallion is... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

How Bruce Lee Changed the World... Get to know the man behind the laser-fast kicks in a documentary exploring the... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

The Forbidden Kingdom DVD It's all Jackie and Jet in this fist-flying fighting feature. Jackie Chan and... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

The Spy Next Door DVD Jackie Chan star in this action comedy that proves that working for the CIA as a... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now



Also Known As: Cheng Leng, Chan Kong-Sang, Fong Si-Lung, Chan Yuen Lung Died:
Born: April 7, 1954 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Hong Kong Profession: actor, producer, director, executive, stunt choreographer, singer, guild president, comic book creator, martial arts coordinator, stuntman, extra, bricklayer, dishwasher

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

After first establishing his martial arts prowess in his native Hong Kong, actor-choreographer-director Jackie Chan translated his massive success in Southeast Asia to become a huge international star, particularly in America. With a reputation as an unrelenting performer willing to risk bodily injury - both with himself and his fellow stuntmen - to create elaborate and jaw-dropping action sequences, Chan amazed critics and audiences with his sheer technical skill while redefining Hong Kong action movies by bringing in an element of comedy. He spent the first couple of decades finding his footing, but had a major breakthrough with the action-comedy, "Snake in the Eagle's Shadow" (1978), which propelled the previously-struggling performer into the limelight. Though he took a shot at Hollywood with "Battle Creek Brawl" (1980) and "The Cannonball Run" (1981), he would have to wait until "Rumble in the Bronx" (1996) to make his mark in the United States. But it was his starring turn in the wildly popular "Rush Hour" (1998) and its sequels that cemented his place as one of Hollywood's elite action stars. His status as a bankable actor was further enhanced with "Shanghai Noon" (2001) and its follow-up,...

After first establishing his martial arts prowess in his native Hong Kong, actor-choreographer-director Jackie Chan translated his massive success in Southeast Asia to become a huge international star, particularly in America. With a reputation as an unrelenting performer willing to risk bodily injury - both with himself and his fellow stuntmen - to create elaborate and jaw-dropping action sequences, Chan amazed critics and audiences with his sheer technical skill while redefining Hong Kong action movies by bringing in an element of comedy. He spent the first couple of decades finding his footing, but had a major breakthrough with the action-comedy, "Snake in the Eagle's Shadow" (1978), which propelled the previously-struggling performer into the limelight. Though he took a shot at Hollywood with "Battle Creek Brawl" (1980) and "The Cannonball Run" (1981), he would have to wait until "Rumble in the Bronx" (1996) to make his mark in the United States. But it was his starring turn in the wildly popular "Rush Hour" (1998) and its sequels that cemented his place as one of Hollywood's elite action stars. His status as a bankable actor was further enhanced with "Shanghai Noon" (2001) and its follow-up, "Shanghai Knights" (2003), though he took a stumble with "Around the World in 80 Days" (2004). While he returned to Hong Kong for a number of films, including his first with Jet Li, "The Forbidden Kingdom" (2008), Chan remained busy in Hollywood, as he retained his hold on being a popular box office draw.

Born on April 7, 1954 in Victoria Peak, Hong Kong, Chan was raised in a working class home by his father, Charles, a cook, and his mother, Lee-Lee, a cook and domestic respectively at the French consulate in Hong Kong. After failing out of the Nah-Hwa Primary School his first year, Chan immigrated to Australia with his parents where his father found work as a cook at the American embassy. A year later, Chan was sent back to Hong Kong, where he attended the Chinese Drama Academy, studying mime, acrobatics, singing, kung fu and Peking Opera for the next ten years with master Yu Jim-Yuen. A renowned wu-shen performer, Master Yu created the ensemble group, The Seven Little Fortunes, of which Chan became a member. He made his first onscreen appearance as one of the Seven Little Fortunes in the now-lost martial arts movie, "Big and Little Wong Tin Bar" (1962). He followed up with "The Love Eterne" (1963) and later in the decade with "Come Drink with Me" (1966), a martial arts film directed by King Hu that remained an all-time classic of Hong Kong cinema.

In 1971, Chan graduated from the Chinese Drama Academy and began appearing as an adult in numerous features, including forgettable fare like "A Touch of Zen" (1971) and "Monkey in the Master's Eye" (1972), while serving as a stuntman in famed Bruce Lee movies like "Fist of Fury" (1972) and "Enter the Dragon" (1973). Chan soon had his own starring vehicle, "The Little Tiger of Guangdong" (1973), which became a box office disappointment. By the time he made the adult comedy, "All in the Family" (1975), which did not feature one fight or action sequence, Chan had fallen into a slump, which led to rejoining his parents in Canberra, Australia in 1976, where he worked as a bricklayer and briefly attended Dickson College. Chan was called back to Hong Kong by producer Willie Chan, who paired him with director Lo Wei for "New Fist of Fury" (1976), in which he was billed as a new Bruce Lee. Even though Lo Wei directed Lee in the original "Fist of Fury," Chan was unable to duplicate the success and suffered another box office flop.

Chan finally had a major breakthrough with "Snake in the Eagle's Shadow" (1978), which featured a more comedic style that allowed him to fully flourish on screen, leading to a change of course in the Hong Kong martial arts film. He began attracting larger audiences with "The Young Master" (1980) and "Dragon Lord" (1982), while breaking out internationally with a starring role in the slapstick "Battle Creek Brawl" (1980) and a small part as the driver of a high-tech Subaru in "The Cannonball Run" (1981). Chan next took a turn at directing with the action comedy "Project A" (1983), which he followed with an appearance in the abysmal sequel, "Cannonball Run II" (1984). The following year, he directed, starred and performed his own stunts in "Police Story" (1985), which became a huge hit and won several Hong Kong Film Awards, including Best Picture. But because of numerous large-scale stunts, several stuntmen - including Chan - were injured during production. Forced to form the Jackie Chan Stuntmen Association after none were willing to work with him again, he assembled his own team, trained them personally and paid their medical bills out of his own pocket. He also formed Jackie's Angels, a casting and modeling agency, to cast his increasingly elaborate productions.

Chan followed "Police Story" with an even bigger success, "Armour of God" (1987), which went on to become Hong Kong's highest-grossing movie ever up to that point. Finally, after decades of professional disappointment, Chan had become the highest paid film artist in Hong Kong and cultivated an international following. Following "Armour of God," he starred alongside old friends Samo Hung and Yuen Biao - who called each other The Three Brothers - in "Dragons Forever" (1988), which marked the final time the trio starred onscreen together after three decades of collaboration. Chan went on to star in several successful sequels, including "Police Story 2" (1988), "Armour of God II: Operation Condor" (1991), which received theatrical release in the United States, and "Police Story 3" (1992), later released in the America as "Supercop" in 1996. Meanwhile, Chan finally had crossover success with "Rumble in the Bronx" (1996), a dubbed and re-edited Hong Kong martial arts action comedy that found a strong cult following and ushered Chan into Hollywood stardom.

Teamed with former stunt man/precision driver-turned-director Stanley Tong and pop star-actress Anita Mui, Chan was the real driving force behind "Rumble in the Bronx" after securing creative control. Shot in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, the joint venture between Hong Kong's Golden Harvest and New Line Cinema served up an old-fashioned story with state-of-the-art stunts bolstered with a major marketing campaign. Chan had made his arrival, turning up in numerous publications, getting keys to various cities and chatting on late night talks shows with David Letterman and Jay Leno. In the film, he portrayed a vacationing Hong Kong cop forced to contend with gangs and the mob in a quirky and rather quaint version of the Bronx. The nonsensical story provided an excellent showcase both for Chan's peerless athleticism and his engaging personality. Despite some unconvincing dubbing, reviewers and audiences were charmed by the movie, which hauled in $10 million at the box office. America finally discovered Jackie Chan, while Hollywood executives scrambled to find ways to bring in more of Hong Kong's most famous export.

Though his next film, "Mr. Nice Guy" (1998), stumbled at the box office, Chan had his first taste of blockbuster success with the crowd-pleasing action comedy, "Rush Hour" (1998), which teamed the martial artist with rising comic actor Chris Tucker. Chan played a Hong Kong detective who forms an uneasy partnership with a rogue LAPD detective (Tucker), as both try to track down the kidnapped daughter (Julia Hsu) of the Chinese consul (Tzi Ma). A huge box office hit in the United States, "Rush Hour" catapulted Chan to true stardom and set the tone of the next stage of his career - namely, being teamed with a popular American sidekick in action-oriented buddy comedies. He next had a successful outing with Owen Wilson in "Shanghai Noon" (2000), a highly amusing comedy-Western that saw Chan as the Chinese Chon Wang (sounds like "John Wayne") seeking a kidnapped princess (Lucy Liu) in the Old West with the help of Wilson's scalawag Roy O'Bannon. Once again, Chan showed real charm as a fish-out-of-water, while providing a great foil for Wilson.

After reuniting with Tucker for the inevitable sequel, "Rush Hour 2" (2001), which fared even better than its predecessor, Chan joined Jennifer Love Hewitt for "The Tuxedo" (2002), an action comedy that was made with some verve and ingenuity, but failed to lure large audiences. Meanwhile, he rejoined Wilson for the sequel "Shanghai Knights" (2003), which took the two leads to London for a further dose of slapstick action. That same year, Chan starred in the English language Hong Kong actioner "The Medallion" (2003), playing a detective who suffers a fatal accident involving a mysterious medallion and is transformed into an immortal warrior with superhuman powers. Most critics found the film to be a fairly standard Chan outing, with a few eye-popping action stunts and a potent dose of his charms. Chan next appeared headlining the all-star ensemble of "Around the World in 80 Days" (2004), a loose, comedic version of the classic Jules Verne novel in which Chan played Passepartout, traveling companion to Phileas Fogg (Steve Coogan), who is repositioned as the true star of the story, a Chinese thief traveling incognito and defending the eccentric Fogg from a variety of menaces and bizarre situations. The film did not perform well with critics or at the box office.

Having achieved massive success in America, Chan made a return to his native Hong Kong for a reboot of the "Police Story" series with "New Police Story" (2004). He followed with "The Myth" (2005) and "Robin-B-Hood" (2006), which also wrote, before crossing back over the Pacific to make "Rush Hour 3" (2007), another huge box office hit despite negative critical reviews. Chan next had his first onscreen collaboration with fellow Hong Kong star, Jet Li, in "The Forbidden Kingdom" (2008), about a time-traveling teenager (Michael Angarano) from modern-day America who is thrust back to ancient China, where he joins a crew of warriors trying to free an imprisoned king. After voicing Master Monkey in the hit animated action comedy, "Kung Fu Panda" (2008), Chan had a relatively quiet 2009, only to re-emerge the following year in the children's comedy "The Spy Next Door" (2010). Meanwhile, he took over the Mr. Miyagi role in the reboot of "The Karate Kid" (2010), playing Mr. Han, a martial arts expert who trains a 12-year-old boy (Jaden Smith) to compete in a tournament against the school bullies.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
2.
  1911 (2011)
3.
  Jackie Chan's Project A (1999) Director
5.
  Who Am I? (1998) Director
6.
  Rumble in the Bronx (1995) Martial Arts Director
7.
  Armour of God, The (1994) Director
8.
  Operation Condor (1991) Director
9.
  Project A (1991) Director
10.
  Miracles (1989) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Dragon Blade (2015)
2.
 Skiptrace (2014)
3.
4.
 Chinese Zodiac (2013)
5.
 Kung Fu Panda 2 (2011)
6.
 1911 (2011)
7.
 Shaolin (2011)
8.
9.
 Flying Duck (2010)
10.
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Emigrated to Australia with his parents as a small child
1961:
Returned to Hong Kong at age seven to attend the Chinese Drama Academy
1961:
Trained in the techniques of Peking Opera under threat of corporal punishment (caning) and food deprivation
1962:
Made feature acting debut at age eight in the Cantonese feature "Big and Little Wong Tin Bar"
:
Performed with a student group called the Seven Little Fortunes; first worked with Sammo Hung and Yuen Biao
1971:
After graduating, rejoined his parents in Australia working various odd jobs such as dishwashing and bricklaying
:
Returned to Hong Kong and worked as a stunt man and martial arts fighter in the Shaw Brothers studios; adopted the stage name Chen Yuan Long
1971:
First film role as an adult, "Little Tiger from Canton"
1972:
Stunt double for Lo Wei's "Fist of Fury"; executed what was reputedly the highest fall ever attempted in Asian cinema
1972:
First credit as fight choreographer, "Police Woman"
1973:
First credit as martial arts director, "The Heroine" (also played second male lead)
1973:
First film lead, "The Little Tiger of Guangdong" (shelved until 1974)
1974:
First released theatrical feature in starring role, "Stranger in Hong Kong"
1975:
Appeared in director John Woo's "Hand of Death"
1977:
Acted in first comedy, the kung fu parody "Half a Loaf of Kung Fu'
1978:
First major breakthrough, "Snake in the Eagle's Shadow"
1978:
First mainstream success, the landmark kung fu comedy, "Drunken Master"
1979:
Co-directing debut (with Kenneth Tsang), "The Fearless Hyena"
1980:
American film debut, "The Big Brawl" with Jose Ferrer
1980:
Played a minor role in "The Cannonball Run" starring Burt Reynolds
1983:
Directed (also starred) the action-comedy, "Project A"
1984:
Appeared in "Cannonball Run II"
1985:
Directed "Police Story"; also starred and performed own stunts
:
Formed the Jackie Chan Stuntmen Association
1985:
Starred in the American-produced police drama "The Protector" co-starring Danny Aiello
1986:
Directed and starred in "Armor of God" a parody which became Hong Kong's third highest-grossing film of the 1980s
:
Formed own production company, Golden Way
1989:
Directed (also starred) "Mr. Canton and Lady Rose" a remake of Frank Capra's "Pocketful of Miracles"
1993:
Played a rare dramatic starring role in "Crime Story"
1995:
Created original character for <i>"Jackie Chan's Spartan X</i> a six-issue comic book series
1996:
Re-launched US film career as the star of "Rumble in the Bronx"
1998:
Teamed with comedian Chris Tucker for the box-office hit "Rush Hour"
2000:
Co-starred with Owen Wilson in the action feature "Shanghai Noon"
2001:
Re-teamed with Tucker for "Rush Hour 2"
2002:
Starred in the action comedy "The Tuxedo"
2002:
Received a star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame
2003:
Was reunited with Samo Hung as co-star in "Highbinders"
2003:
Starred in the action comedy "Shanghai Knights"
2004:
Starred as Passepartout in the Disney live action feature "Around the World in 80 Days"
2006:
Starred in the action comedy, "Rob-B-Hood"; also co-wrote
2007:
Re-teamed with Chris Tucker and director Brett Ratner for "Rush Hour 3"
2008:
First onscreen collaboration with fellow Chinese actor Jet Li, "The Forbidden Kingdom"
2008:
Lent his voice to the animated feature, "Kung Fu Panda"
2010:
Starred opposite Jaden Smith in "The Karate Kid"
2011:
Once again voiced Monkey in "Kung Fu Panda 2"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Nah-Hwa Primary School: -
Chinese Drama Academy: - 1961 - 1971
Dickson College: - 1976

Notes

Chan is a founder and officer of the Hong Kong Directors Guild, Performing Artists Guild and Society of Cinematographers.

Chan is the owner of "Jackie's Angels", a casting and modeling agency which he uses to cast his productions

A huge singing sensation throughout Asia, Chan reportedly sang the title track for the HK release of "Beauty and the Beast" according to Time Out New York, February 21-28 1996.

"I wanted to be like a Chaplin or Buster Keaton, but all the martial arts directors I worked with wanted me to copy Bruce Lee," he said. "So after I got famous, I started to change a lot of things. When I was filming "Snake in the Eagle's Shadow" in the late 1970's, I sat down with the director and watched a Bruce Lee film. I decided, when Bruce Lee kicked high, I'd kick low. When Bruce Lee yowled, I'd punch doing a funny face like it hurt. Whatever Bruce Lee did, I'd do the opposite." --From "Faster Than a Speeding Bullet, But Also Humanly Fallible" by Neil Strauss in The New York Times, January 30, 1995.

"Chan--whose Chinese screen name, Sing Lung translates as "becoming the dragon"--is so fearless as to seem, by mere human standards, senseless. In "Police Story" he hitches a ride on a speeding bus by running up from behind, hooking an umbrella onto a window ledge and hanging on while fighting off a brood of bad guys. (Gape in envy, Keanu Reeves!) In "The Armour of God II: Operation Condor" he drives his motorcycle off a riverside pier and leaps off in midair to catch onto the net of a passing mechanical crane. (Page your stunt double, Mr. Seagal!) In "Project A", improving on the clock-tower hanging scene from [Harold] Lloyd's "Safety Last", Chan falls from the sky-high tower through two awnings and crashes to earth--on his head. (Tiptoe away, Lloyd's of London.)" --From "Jackie Can!" by Richard Corliss, Time, February 13, 1995.

"Along with his insouciantly superb athleticism, Jackie Chan's slightly puzzled manner and eager-to-please demeanor have charmed fans the world over. Even when the plot of "Supercop" (the latest in the "Police Story" series) requires a menacing look, he manages a bemused air, cognizant of the improbability both of the storyline and his stature. Chan is Everyman as Reluctant Warrior. You get the feeling he'd rather be out for a quiet stroll or a beer than dodge bullets and cling to helicopters, as he does in this flick. Contrast this with Bruce Lee, whose avenging angel persona seemed real, a warrior rarely given to laughter." --Luis H. Francia (reviewing "Police Story III: Supercop" in Village Voice, September 1, 1992).

"Jackie becomes serious as he reminiscences: 'The days at opera school were very long. Every day we would train from dawn to midnight, and anyone caught taking it easy would be whipped and starved. I don't know how the intense training affected me as a child or shaped me as an adult. I DO know that I draw all my creativity for fight directing from those years of arduous training. But I would never put my kids through it, and I would never tell anyone to do the same thing.'" --From "An Evening with Jackie Chan" by Dr. Craig Reid, Bright Lights (1995).

"Twice a year, he hosts a party for the Jackie Chan International Fan Club, many of whose members fly in from Japan. At one point, the club had more than 10,000 members, most of them girls. Being a teen idol, however, has exacted its price: in his films and his private life, Chan must be careful not to reveal too much romantic involvement. In 1985, after he mentioned in an interview that he was dating someone, a Japanese girl committed suicide. [She threw herself in front of the Bullet Train.] The next year, another Japanese fan arrived at his office, announced her intention of bearing Chan's child and drank a vial of poison." --From "Jackie Chan, American Action Hero" by Jaime Wolf, The New York Times Magazine, January 21, 1996.

"I'm very scared," Chan admits, "because I have a responsibility with all my fans. I cannot say, 'Now I have a girlfriend, now I getting married, now I have a son.' How many people die? So all those years, my private life, I'm very secret. Very hard for me, but I'd rather hurt one person, one girl. I don't want to hurt many fans." --From The New York Times Magazine, January 21, 1996.

"Maybe my philosophy different from some other people," he says. "Today, most important is work. Relationship with all my staff because they help me. Girl, wife, son, doesn't help me. So I do everything for public first. Then I think about family." --From The New York Times Magazine, January 21, 1996.

"Every movie I treat like my son--more important than my real son." --Jackie Chan quoted in "Feat of the Feet", in People, March 11, 1996.

"I cannot drink, smoke or go to the karaoke," he says. "I must present a good image. I want to be like John Wayne--a film person that people admire and respect." --Jackie Chan quoted in "Feat of the Feet", People, March 11, 1996.

"Cult Movie Stars" by Danny Peary (NY: Simon & Schuster/Fireside, 1991) reports that Chan had his eyelids surgically altered in the 1980s so as to aid his crossover attempts in the American film market.

"Beyond the requisite daredevil action-comedy elements, Chan looks to include positive messages in his films. In "Rumble", Chan portrays a vacationing Hong Kong cop caught up in street-gang and mob warfare. 'The movie may be called "Rumble in the Bronx", but I wanted to say, good people, bad people are everywhere. Not only Bronx. That's my message. I believe you can see I put Bronx more prettier. More colorful." --From "Chan's Land of Chop-ortunity" by The Phantom of the Movies, Daily News, February 19, 1996.

"In America, they don't have action films anymore--they have computers."--Jackie Chan quoted in "Always Taking Big Chances" by Michael O'Regan, Daily News, February 25, 1996.

Honored as the guest of the Chinese Consul General in Los Angeles, California in February 1996.

Received the key to the city of Los Angeles in 1996.

"Everything 90%. When I'm working, 90%, when I'm not working, 90%. . Most of the time when I'm not working, I'm helping people, because if there's really a God looking after me, all those years, [he] just takes care of me. My career is just getting better, better, better. Everything just keeps coming. I say, "I want this, I want that," and it just keeps coming. That's why I promise myself that I pay back society. That's why I start my Jackie Chan Foundation, to help people, sick kids, the hospital, and all that."-Chan

I've always wanted to be animated, because when I was young, "I watched a lot of cartoons. My heroes were Batman and Superman. I never thought that one day I would have my own cartoon. I never imagined it; I just did my thing. And then Columbia TriStar said, "Do you want your own cartoon?" and I said, "Yes!" I never asked how much they would pay me. If they gave me $10, I would do it. And one more thing, cartoons never get old. I never have to break my ankle."-Chan on being an animated character

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Lin Feng-jiao. Actor. Taiwanese; separated from Chan.
companion:
Elaine Ng. Actor. Was at one time crowned Miss Asia; Chan admitted to having a relationship with Ng during filming of "Gorgeous", during which she became pregnant with his child.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Charles Chan. Cook (retired). Worked at the French consulate in Hong Kong; subsequently worked at the American embassy in Australia.
mother:
Lee-Lee Chan. Domestic. Worked at the French embassy in Hong Kong; subsequently worked at the American embassy in Australia.
son:
J C Chan. Born c. 1982; sees his father three or four times a year.

Bibliography close complete biography

"The Essential Jackie Chan Sourcebook" Pocket Books
"I Am Jackie Chan" Ballantine

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute