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Joan Caulfield

Joan Caulfield

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Also Known As: Joan Beatrice Caulfield Died: June 18, 1991
Born: June 1, 1922 Cause of Death: cancer
Birth Place: Orange, New Jersey, USA Profession: Cast ... actor model
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BIOGRAPHY

Delicately pretty, demure Hollywood lead of the 1940s. A former cover-girl and Broadway ingenue, Caulfield exhibited a modest charm in light comedy, most notably opposite William Holden in "Dear Ruth" (1947) and "Dear Wife" (1950). She conveyed refined femininity and bland sophistication in a dozen-plus mediocre features, mostly at Paramount, from her debut in "Miss Susie Slagle's" (1944, released 1946), to her costarring role opposite Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire in the Irving Berlin musical "Blue Skies" (1946), to her later work in B westerns. By the 1950s, her upper middle-class blonde good looks and cultivated manner had been superseded by the more dramatic screen presence of Grace Kelly, her (more acclaimed) successor to the type.

Throughout her film career, Caulfield remained active on stage, mostly in stock or touring productions of contemporary comedies. From 1950 to 1960 she was married to producer Frank Ross, who produced and directed her in "The Lady Says No" (1951), and produced "The Rains of Ranchipur" (1955), in which she played second fiddle to Lana Turner; and also Caulfield's live TV comedy series "My Favorite Husband" (1953-55), and "Sally" (1957-58).

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Holz ( 2008-07-22 )

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In her time was one of the screen's great beauties, many of her cameramen said she was one of the few women in Hollywood whom it was virtually impossible to photograph badly.

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