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Joseph Calleia

Joseph Calleia

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My Little... When Flower Belle Lee is seen embracing a masked bandit, her perfect reputation... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

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Production photos Production Photos

  • Sundown - Scene Stills

    Here are several scene stills from Walter Wanger's Sundown (1941), starring Gene Tierney, Bruce Cabot, and George Sanders.

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Publicity Publicity

  • The Glass Key - Publicity Stills

    Here are a number of publicity stills from The Glass Key (1942), starring Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake and Brian Donlevy. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.

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Other Material Other Material

  • Sundown - Pressbook

    Here is the campaign book (pressbook) for the 1948 reissue of Walter Wanger's Sundown (1941). Pressbooks were sent to exhibitors and theater owners to aid them in publicizing the film's run in their theater.

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  • After the Thin Man - Lobby Card Set

    Here is a set of Lobby Cards from MGM's After the Thin Man (1936), starring William Powell and Myrna Loy. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.

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