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Woody Allen

Woody Allen

  • Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) May 15 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
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Also Known As: Died:
Born: December 1, 1935 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Brooklyn, New York, USA Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

:
At age 15, began sending jokes to columnists Walter Winchell and Earl Wilson
:
Worked at a public relations firm supplying comedy material to Bob Hope and Arthur Murray
1953:
After flunking out of NYU, joined the NBC Writer's Program; contributed to "The Colgate Comedy Hour"
1955:
Hired as a writer for "Your Show Of Shows" at age 19; began writing gags for Herb Shriner, Buddy Hackett and Art Carney
1960:
Stage writing debut for revue, "From A to Z"
1960:
Debut as stand-up comedian at The Blue Angel in NYC (October)
:
Became staff writer on "The Tonight Show" (NBC)
1964:
First guest-host to replace Johnny Carson on "The Tonight Show" (NBC)
1965:
Feature film acting and writing debut, "What's New Pussycat?"; helmed by Clive Donner
1966:
First play produced on Broadway, "Don't Drink the Water"
1966:
Made feature film, "What's Up, Tiger Lily?" using existing footage of a Japanese film, creating new story by dubbing in voices
1969:
TV writing and acting debut with the short film, "Cupid's Shaft"
1969:
Headlined "Woody's First Special" (CBS) and "The Woody Allen Special" (NBC)
1969:
Feature film directing debut (also screenwriter; actor), "Take the Money and Run"
1969:
Broadway acting debut in "Play It Again, Sam"; also playwright
1970:
Debut as TV series regular on the NBC children's show "Hot Dog"
1971:
Published first collection of comic material "Getting Even"
1972:
First of six films opposite Diane Keaton, "Play It Again, Sam"
1976:
Rare acting appearance in a film which he did not direct, "The Front"
1977:
Breakthrough film, "Annie Hall"; film won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director
1978:
Directed first film drama, "Interiors"
1979:
Last film opposite Diane Keaton for 14 years (except for her cameo in 1987's "Radio Days"), "Manhattan"
1981:
Wrote the full-length stage comedy "The Floating Light Bulb"
1982:
First film with Mia Farrow, "A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy"
1986:
Won third Oscar for Best Original Screenplay for "Hannah and Her Sisters"
1987:
Had cameo in Jean-Luc Godard's "King Lear"
1991:
Co-starred with Bette Midler in Paul Mazursky's "Scenes from a Mall"
1991:
Signed an agreement with Italy's National Association of Consumer Cooperatives (COOP) to write and direct of series of five TV commericials (his first); fee for the package rumored to be 3 million lire ($2.5 million)
1991:
Signed deal with TriStar Pictures (September); began first film for them, "Husbands and Wives"
1993:
Completed a second film for TriStar, "Manhattan Murder Mystery" (reteaming him with Diane Keaton); ended multi-picture deal with the company; signed with Sweetland Films in July
1994:
Had modest success with the period comedy "Bullets Over Broadway"
1994:
Made rare TV acting appearance in small screen remake of "Don't Drink the Water" (ABC); also directed and wrote
1995:
Wrote, directed, and co-starred with Mira Sorvino and F. Murray Abraham in "Mighty Aphrodite"
1996:
Co-starred with Peter Falk in TV remake of Neil Simon's "The Sunshine Boys" (CBS)
1997:
First film distributed by Fine Line, "Deconstructing Harry"; nominated for a Best Original Screenplay Oscar; Allen's 20th Academy Award nomination and 13th for screenwriting, making him the most nominated screenwriter in Academy history
1998:
Made unbilled cameo appearance in Stanley Tucci's film "The Imposters"
1998:
Voiced the characters of the worker ant Z in the DreamWorks-produced animated film "Antz"
1998:
Released his 30th film as director, "Celebrity"
1999:
Wrote and directed "Sweet and Lowdown," starring Sean Penn as a 1930s jazz guitarist
2000:
Wrote and directed the comedy "Small Time Crooks"
2000:
In March, signed distribution deal with DreamWorks
2001:
Helmed (also wrote) "The Curse of the Jade Scorpion"
2002:
Wrote, directed and starred in "Hollywood Ending"
2003:
Directed (also wrote and co-starred in) the comedy "Anything Else," starring Christina Ricci and Jason Biggs
2004:
Helmed the play "A Second Hand Memory" at the Atlantic Theater Company
2005:
Directed (also wrote and starred in) "Melinda and Melinda," a comedic storyline which is one of two (one comic and one tragic) that revolve around the titular character played by Radha Mitchell
2005:
Helmed the dark themed "Match Point," starring Scarlett Johansson and Jonathan Rhys-Meyers; the first four films under the DreamWorks SKG banner and first film shot in England; earned Golden Globe nominations for Directing and Screenplay
2006:
Once again directed Scarlett Johansson in the comedy "Scoop"; also wrote and co-starred
2008:
Directed Colin Farrell and Ewan McGregor in "Cassandra's Dream"
2008:
Directed first film in Spain, "Vicky Cristina Barcelona"; once again collaborated with Scarlett Johansson
2008:
Directed "Gianni Schicchi," the comic third part of Puccini's "Trittico" in Los Angeles
2009:
Returned to New York with the offbeat comedy "Whatever Works," starring Larry David
2010:
Wrote and directed his fourth film shot in London, "You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger"
2010:
Earned a Grammy nomination for Best Spoken Word for the album, <i>The Woody Allen Collection: Mere Anarchy, Side Effects, Without Feathers, Getting Even</i>
2011:
Directed "Midnight in Paris," his first feature shot entirely in Paris; starred Owen Wilson, Rachel McAdams, and Kathy Bates
2012:
Wrote and directed an ensemble cast in the romantic comedy "To Rome with Love"; also acted in his first film since 2006's "Scoop"

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