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Henry Bumstead

Henry Bumstead

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: March 17, 1915 Cause of Death: prostate cancer
Birth Place: Ontario, CA Profession: production designer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Veteran production designer Henry Bumstead began designing film sets in collaboration with Hans Dreier with three features in 1948: "Saigon", "The Sainted Sisters" and "My Own True Love". They went on to work together on a half-dozen other feature, including "My Friend Irma" 1949 and its 1950 sequel "My Friend Irma Goes West". Bumstead was then teamed with Hal Pereira and that collaboration yielded some 20 features. Perhaps the best-known of their joint efforts were two classic Hitchcock thrillers "The Man Who Knew Too Much" (1956), with its French Morocco milieu, and "Vertigo" (1958), which brought them an Academy Award nod for their San Franciscan settings. (Bumstead later worked with Hitchcock on "Topaz" 1969 and "The Family Plot" 1976.) For much of the decade between 1962 and 1972, Bumstead teamed with Alexander Golitzen, earning an Oscar for their Southern designs for "To Kill a Mockingbird" (1962). Among the other more notable results of their pairing were the South Seas island of "Father Goose" (1964) and the Western towns of the Clint Eastwood vehicle "Joe Kidd" (1972). The designer has also enjoyed a fruitful collaboration with director George Roy Hill, earning a second Oscar for the...

Veteran production designer Henry Bumstead began designing film sets in collaboration with Hans Dreier with three features in 1948: "Saigon", "The Sainted Sisters" and "My Own True Love". They went on to work together on a half-dozen other feature, including "My Friend Irma" 1949 and its 1950 sequel "My Friend Irma Goes West". Bumstead was then teamed with Hal Pereira and that collaboration yielded some 20 features. Perhaps the best-known of their joint efforts were two classic Hitchcock thrillers "The Man Who Knew Too Much" (1956), with its French Morocco milieu, and "Vertigo" (1958), which brought them an Academy Award nod for their San Franciscan settings. (Bumstead later worked with Hitchcock on "Topaz" 1969 and "The Family Plot" 1976.) For much of the decade between 1962 and 1972, Bumstead teamed with Alexander Golitzen, earning an Oscar for their Southern designs for "To Kill a Mockingbird" (1962). Among the other more notable results of their pairing were the South Seas island of "Father Goose" (1964) and the Western towns of the Clint Eastwood vehicle "Joe Kidd" (1972). The designer has also enjoyed a fruitful collaboration with director George Roy Hill, earning a second Oscar for the Roaring Twenties sets of "The Sting" (1973). Bumstead fashioned the dusty towns and period settings for "The Great Waldo Pepper" (1975) before taking a more modern approach with the farm team hockey story "Slap Shot" (1977). "The World According to Garp" (1982) encompassed several decades as the lead character goes from youth to adulthood. A similar challenge was to create the period flavors for each segment of "Same Time, Next Year" (1978), which covered some two decades. He revisited Hitchcock territory provided the look for "Psycho III" (1986), directed by star Anthony Perkins. When director Clint Eastwood was putting the design team together for his revisionist Western "Unforgiven" (1992), he tapped Bumstead who was rewarded with yet another Oscar nomination for his efforts. Since then, Bumstead has designed "A Perfect World" (1993), "Absolute Power" and "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil" (both 1997) for Eastwood. In 1998, the octogenarian was honored with a lifetime achievement award by his peers in the Society of Motion Picture and Television Art Directors.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

2.
 Time of Destiny, A (1988) Colonel In Italy
3.
 Slaughterhouse-Five (1972) Eliot Rosewater
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1948:
First of ten films in colloboration with fellow designer Hans Dreier; "Saigon", credited as art director
1950:
Began working in tandem with Hal Pereira with "The Goldbergs" and "The Redhead and the Cowboy"; together designed some 20 films in all
1956:
Initial collaboration with Alfred Hitchcock, "The Man Who Knew Too Much"
1958:
With Pereira, designed Hitchcock's "Vertigo"; received first Academy Award nomination
1962:
First collaborations with Alexander Golitzen, "The Spiral Road" and "To Kill a Mockingbird"; won Oscar for the latter
1969:
Served as production designer on Hitchcock's "Topaz"
1970:
First TV-movie credit, "The Movie Murderer" (NBC)
1972:
Acting debut in George Roy Hill's "Slaughterhouse Five" (also production designer)
1972:
First collaboration with Clint Eastwood, "Joe Kidd"
1973:
Earned second Oscar for his period designs for "The Sting", directed by George Roy Hill
1976:
Final collaboration with Hichcock, "Family Plot"
1978:
Designed "Same Time, Next Year"
1982:
Provided the look "The World According to Garp", directed by George Roy Hill
1984:
Last screen collaboration with George Roy Hill, "The Little Drummer Girl"
1986:
Revisted Hitchcock territory designing "Psycho III". directed by star Anthony Perkins
1988:
Appeared in the film "A Time of Destiny"; also served as production designer
1992:
Reteamed with Clint Eastwood for the revisionist Western "Unforgiven"; received an Oscar nomination
1993:
Worked again with Eastwood on "A Perfect World"
1997:
Collaborated with Eastwood on both "Absolute Power" and "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil"
:
Designed the sets for Eastwood's "Blood Work"; 10th collaboration with the director-star
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University of Southern California: Los Angeles , California - 1937

Notes

"I've worked 67 years steady. I've never looked for a job, and I've never been fired. I owe it to lots of luck that I've worked with good directors and good scripts and good actresses and actors."---Henry Bumstead to Los Angeles Magazine, November 2004.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Betty Bumstead. Married in 1937; divorced; mother of Bumstead's four children.
wife:
Lena Bumstead. Second wife; married in 1983.

Contributions

KellyZ ( 2010-08-06 )

Source: not available

Henry Bumstead was from Ontario, California, not Ontario Canada. His nationality was American. His family has lived in Ontario, California since the turn of the 20th century where his father opened a bicycle shop in Ontario which is still in business today.

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