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James S. Brown Jr.

James S. Brown Jr.

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Also Known As: Died: June 1, 1949
Born: March 16, 1892 Cause of Death: self-inflicted gunshot wound
Birth Place: New Jersey, USA Profession: Cinematography ...
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COMPLETE FILMOGRAPHY WITH SYNOPSIS

Cinematography (feature film)

1.
The Owl and the Pussycat (1970) as Cam crew
When a bookworm gets a prostitute evicted, she moves into his apartment.
2.
An Evening With Batman and Robin (1965) as Director of Photography
3.
Zamba (1949) as Director of Photography
4.
The Prairie (1949) as Director of Photography
5.
Midnight Frolics (1949) as Photography
6.
Deadline (1948) as Camera
7.
The Counterfeiters (1948) as Director of Photography
8.
Frontier Revenge (1948) as Director of Photography
9.
Stage to Mesa City (1948) as Director of Photography
Lash and Fuzzy sent to help John Watson with his stage line arrive to find him murdered. Recognizing the outlaws they trail them to their leader Baxter. But before Baxter can tell who the big boss is he is shot. After getting the stage through to assure the mail contract, Lash now realizes who the boss is.
10.
Tornado Range (1948) as Director of Photography
Homesteaders are moving onto the ranchers grazing land and Eddie has been sent to stop a range war between the two sides. Thayer is after the land and has his men out trying to start that war. When his henchman Dorgan kills Sawyer, Sawyer's son goes for revenge, When Eddie tries to stop him, Dorgan shoots another man and Eddie is accused and finds himself about to be hung.
11.
Dragnet (1947) as Director of Photography
12.
The Case of the Baby Sitter (1947) as Cinematographer
13.
The Hat-box Mystery (1947) as Cinematographer
14.
Ridin' Down the Trail (1947) as Director of Photography
15.
Shadows on the Range (1946) as Director of Photography
Cattleman Agent Mason arrives to help find rustlers. A letter to the Sheriff and a fake scar gets him identified as a wanted murderer and attracts the attention of the gang leader. But when he is named the new boss of the gang, dissension arises between the leader and the rustlers and Mason must now try to bring them all in.
16.
Renegade Girl (1946) as Director of Photography
Jean Shelby, a member of a family of Confederate sympathizers in Missouri during the Civil War, has been providing information about the Union Army to Confederate Raiders. So the Union is trying to capture the Shelby family, with the help of an outcast Indian who has his own grudge against the Shelbys. When Jean and a Yankee captain fall in love, their plans and loyalties are tested.
17.
Strangler of the Swamp (1946) as Director of Photography
A number of swamp land men have died by strangulation and the inhabitants believe that an innocent man they hanged is seeking revenge on all of the male descendants of those responsible for his death. Maria (Rosemary La Planche), granddaughter of the innocent ferryman (Charles Middleton), decides to operate the ferry service. Chris Sanders (Blake Edwards), a son of one of the men (Robert Barratt) who did the hanging, and Maria fall in love. The "strangler" seizes Chris and Maria offers her life if Chris is spared.
18.
Devil Bat's Daughter (1946) as Director of Photography
Wishing to dispose of his wife, psychiatrist Doctor Elliott (Nolan Leary) makes his patient Nina (Rosemary La Planche) think that she suffers from a compulsion to kill. He drugs Nina, murders his wife and leaves evidence that points to Nina. The latter, pre-conditioned by Elliott, also thinks she is guilty.
19.
The Great Flamarion (1945) as Photography
A vaudevillian is tricked into murder by a bored wife.
20.
The Whistler (1944) as Director of Photography
A grieving widower hires an assassin to kill him only to have his late wife turn up alive.
21.
Shadows in the Night (1944) as Director of Photography
A criminal psychologist tries to help a beautiful heiress going mad in a haunted mansion.
22.
Batman (1943) as Cinematographer
In his first screen appearance, the Caped Crusader of Gotham City (belying the lethargic facade of his alter ego Bruce Wayne) battles Dr. Daka, Japanese mastermind of a wartime espionage-sabotage group. Daka has a radium-powered death ray that pulverizes walls, a classic alligator pit to dispose of enemies, and can turn men into electronic zombies who do his bidding and transmit video signals to Daka's lab! Batman has no Batmobile, but there are bats in the Bat Cave...
23.
No Place for a Lady (1943) as Director of Photography
24.
The Crime Doctor's Strangest Case (1943) as Director of Photography
A criminal psychologist searches for clues in an elderly crime victim's dreams.
25.
Crime Doctor (1943) as Director of Photography
A blow on the head forces a renowned psychologist to remember he was once a criminal.
26.
Enemy Agents Meet Ellery Queen (1942) as Director of Photography
27.
A Close Call for Ellery Queen (1942) as Director of Photography
28.
A Desperate Chance for Ellery Queen (1942) as Director of Photography
29.
Ellery Queen and the Perfect Crime (1941) as Director of Photography
30.
The Great Swindle (1941) as Director of Photography
31.
Ellery Queen's Penthouse Mystery (1941) as Director of Photography
32.
Ellery Queen and the Murder Ring (1941) as Director of Photography
33.
The Great Plane Robbery (1940) as Photography
An insurance company hires a private detective to protect a gangster fresh out of college.
34.
Passport to Alcatraz (1940) as Photography
George Hollister (Jack Holt), crack investigator for the NYC police, is assigned to run down the enemy aliens who dynamited a Detroit munitions plant. The trail takes him to a customs inspector who is known to have honored fake passports provided by Leon Fenten (C. Henry Gordon), chief henchman of Drexel Stuyvesant (Clay Clement) who heads the sabotage ring. Aided by his partner Ray Nolan (Noah Beery Jr). Hollister arrests an agent named Reed (Robert Fiske) and takes his place using the fake passport. As Reed, he is met by Karol Roy (Cecilia Callejo), an innocent assistant, who takes him to Fenten. Working undercover, Hollister is still unable to learn the name of the head man, not even from dumb gang-member Hank Kircher (Maxie Rosenbloom). Stuyvesant warns Fenten of his suspicions about "Reed" and the latter gives Hollister an assignment as a test.
35.
Outside the 3-Mile Limit (1940) as Photography
36.
Fugitive from a Prison Camp (1940) as Photography
37.
Ellery Queen, Master Detective (1940) as Director of Photography
The mysteriously ill John Braun (Fred Niblo) makes a new will, leaving out his daughter Barbara (Marsha Hunt), over the protests of his wife (Ann Shoemaker). The trouble began when the daughter wanted to marry Mr. Braun's doctor, James Rogers (Michael Whalen). Mrs. Braun asks Inspector Queen to help find the long-missing Barbara. The inspector's son, Ellery (Ralph Bellamy), works on the case. He goes to a home frequently visited by Dr. Rogers where the bell is answered by Nikki Porter (Margaret Lindsay) who Ellery mistakes for Barbara and insists she return to the Braun home. Nikki does, to protect Barbara, and a short time later finds herself alone in a room outside Braun's bedroom. She finds him dead - his throat cut. No weapons are found and the door to the room where Nikki had been is locked, and she is suspected. Ellery hides Nikki in his apartment. Braun's body, sent for an autopsy, disappears and in its place is a life-sized statue of the dead man. Elley finds the body in a closet, the police prepare to send it downtown but someone drives off with the ambulance. Ellery, with Nikki, visits Braun's bedroom that night and discovers that a pet raven flies in and out taking items.
38.
The Law Comes to Texas (1939) as Photography
39.
Hidden Power (1939) as Photography
40.
Fugitive at Large (1939) as Photography
41.
Whispering Enemies (1939) as Photography
42.
Frontiers of '49 (1939) as Photography
43.
Trapped in the Sky (1939) as Photography
44.
Lone Star Pioneers (1939) as Photography
45.
Outside the Law (1938) as Photography
46.
Crime Takes a Holiday (1938) as Photography
47.
In Early Arizona (1938) as Photography
48.
Reformatory (1938) as Photography
49.
Making the Headlines (1938) as Photography
50.
Phantom Gold (1938) as Photography
Jack Luden, Beth Marion, Barry Downing, Charles Whitaker, Hal Taliaferro, & Tuffy the dog. A band of outlaws are using a ghost town as their hideout and selling bogus shares of an abandoned gold mine to unsuspecting miners. Jack Luden was a third string western star at Columbia Studios but his films were given a boost by co-star, Tuffy the dog.
51.
Flight into Nowhere (1938) as Photography
52.
Stagecoach Days (1938) as Photography
(Wes '38,BW). Jack Luden, Eleanor Stewart, Harry Woods, Hal Taliaferro, Lafe McKee, Slim Whitaker, Blackjack Ward, & Tuffy the dog. Once again, Tuffy the dog steals the show from cowboy star Jack Luden, in this tale about a race between two stagecoaches and the prize that awaits the victor.
53.
Pioneer Trail (1938) as Photography
Jack Luden, Joan Barclay, Slim Whitaker, Leon Beaumon, Hal Taliaferro, Marin Sais, & Tuffy the dog. The foreman of a cattle drive is kidnapped by outlaws who offer to free him if he participates in a cattle rustling scheme. All is not lost, however, because Tuffy the dog comes to his rescue.
54.
Rolling Caravans (1938) as Photography
55.
Roaring Timber (1937) as Photography
56.
The Ranger Steps In (1937) as Photography
Bob Allen, Eleanor Stewart, John Merton, Hal Taliaferro, Jack Ingram, Jack Rockwell. Texas ranger Bob Allen resigns his commission in order to investigate the real reason behind the longstanding feud between his fiancee's family and his own kin.
57.
Under Suspicion (1937) as Photography
When auto magnate Robert Bailey (Jack Holt) announces he is going to retire and turn his plant over to the employees he incurs the enmity of K.Y. Mitchell (Granville Bates), a large stockholder in the company; Carey MacGregor (Morgan Wallace), head of a parts manufacturing company that depends on Bailey Motors for most of its business; Logan Walters (Robert Emmett Keane), general manager of the business and his social-climbing wife Laura (Margaret Irving); and Mary Brookhart (Katherine DeMille), a predatory widow who is also a large stockholder and in love with Bailey. Bailey announces he is flying to his mountain retreat for a vacation and to complete the transfer of his interests to the employees. On the way to the airport, Bailey's car is side-swiped and his private plane cracks up before leaving the ground. Bailey is injured and his taken home, and narrowly escapes death when a bullet is fired through his bedroom window, He hires noted detective Frank Rogers (Purnell Pratt) to investigate. Mitchell, MacGregor, Walters, Mary and Bailey's ne'er-do-well nephew, Ralph (Maurice Murphy) are all suspected by the detective. In a scheme to make the guilty party show his hand, Bailey, his attorney Nelson Dudley (Craig Reynolds) and Rogers decide to invite the suspects to a week-end party at Bailey's lodge. The nephew brings an uninvited guest, Doris (Rosalind Keith). A dummy decoy is placed in Bailey's bed and another detective placed on watch. The next morning, the operative is found dead from a bullet fired through the window. On Dudley's advice, Bailey and Rogers agree to keep the killing secret. Another detective, accompanied by Dudley, takes the body to town, and later this detective is found dead. MacGregor returns from a hunting trip and tells Bailey and Rogers he knows the name of the guilty party but, just as he about to reveal the name, he is shot from outside. Though MacGregor is not killed, Rogers announces that he is dead. Rogers calls a midnight meeting of all the guests and Bailey, noting that Dudley is missing, starts a search of the house. He is attacked in the cellar, but subdues his assailant.
58.
Outlaws of the Orient (1937) as Photography
59.
Trouble in Morocco (1937) as Photography
60.
Law of the Ranger (1937) as Photography
A Texan Ranger must stop a greedy land owner out to steal the town's water rights.
61.
Shadows of the Orient (1937) as Photography
62.
Rich Relations (1937) as Photography
63.
Trapped by G-Men (1937) as Photography
64.
North of Nome (1936) as Photography
65.
Heroes of the Range (1936) as Photography
66.
Ranger Courage (1936) as Photography
Bob Allen, Martha Tibbetts, Walter Miller, Robert 'Buzz' Henry, and Harry Strang as Snaky. Bob Allen is the Texas Ranger sent to protect a wagon train bearing a well-stocked strongbox through Indian territory.
67.
Rio Grande Ranger (1936) as Photography
68.
The Fugitive Sheriff (1936) as Photography
Just after his man Louder loses the Sheriff's election to Ken, Flamer finds Ken's rowel. Then he and his men rob the train as he poses as Ken and leaves the rowel. The train crew's identification plus the rowel convicts Ken. Ken escapes but must now prove his innocence as a fugitive.
69.
Avenging Waters (1936) as Photography
Neighboring ranchers feud between cattle land.
70.
The Unknown Ranger (1936) as Photography
A ranger in disguise tries to clear a wild horse accused of rustling.
71.
Western Frontier (1935) as Photography
72.
Reckless Roads (1935) as Camera
73.
Get That Man (1935) as Photography
74.
Manhattan Butterfly (1935) as Photography
75.
The Perfect Clue (1935) as Photography
76.
Murder by Television (1935) as Photography
James Houghland, inventor of a new method by which television signals can be instantaneously sent anywhere in the world, refuses to sell the process to television companies, who then send agents to acquire the invention any way they can. On the night of his initial broadcast Houghland is mysteriously murdered in the middle of his demonstration and it falls to Police Chief Nelson to determine who the murderer is from the many suspects present.
77.
Calling All Cars (1935) as Photography
78.
Back Page (1934) as Photography
79.
Night Alarm (1934) as Photography
80.
The Fighting Rookie (1934) as Camera
81.
Badge of Honor (1934) as Photography
82.
She Had to Choose (1934) as Photography
83.
Dancing Man (1934) as Photography
84.
The Scarlet Letter (1934) as Photography
At the end of the 17th century a impetuous woman of noble birth but poor arrives in Boston when it was just a village rather than a city. As she is married to an old doctor she tries to change her life.
85.
Secret Sinners (1933) as Photography
86.
The Big Bluff (1933) as Camera
87.
Cheating Blondes (1933) as Photography
88.
Her Forgotten Past (1933) as Photography
89.
What's Your Racket (1933) as Photography
90.
The Vanishing Frontier (1932) as Photography
Its 1850 and California is under ruthless military rule. Kirby Tornell's rancho has been taken over by soldiers and when two of Kirby's men are captured, he goes there to free them. He meets the General's daughter there and attracted to her, repeatedly returns to see her. Eventually he is captured and now his men must try and rescue him.
91.
Defenders of the Law (1931) as Photography
92.
Air Eagles (1931) as Photography
93.
Mystery Train (1931) as Photography
94.
With Sitting Bull at the Spirit Lake Massacre (1927) as Director of Photography
95.
Home Sweet Home (1926) as Director of Photography

Film Production - Main (feature film)

96.
Secret Code, The (1942) as Photography
Another film made during WW II in which all the German-born actors, or actors with German-sounding names, changed their names for, to use a WW II expression, "the duration." Here Rudolph Anders chose to be billed as Robert O. Davis and Ludwig Donath opted for Louis Donath, even though they, and most of the other name-change actors of the day, always ended up playing Nazis anyway. This Columbia serial, made after Columbia serial producer Larry Darmour had died, thus making Ralph Cohn the credited producer, finds Police Lieutenant Dan Barton (Paul Kelly), ordered to contact and smash a mysterious Axis sabotage ring, arranging to have himself thrown off the police force in disgrace. He calls attention to himself by assaulting a high government official, the custodian of a newly-devised formula for the manufacture of synthetic rubber, in a faked "effort" to steal the formula. While under the "protection" of the saboteurs who are still suspicious of him, Dan learns that they have been ordered to capture the secret formula by a secret code, whose method of operation is in itself of vital military value. Escaping and disguising himself in a specially-made "Black Commando" suit of fire-proof material (with no Super-Hero powers beyond those possessed by his stunt double), he foils the first Nazi attempt. From that moment on, Barton plays a risky game of life and death; as a disgraced policeman, he becomes an accepted member of the gang and as the Black Commando, he fights them at every turn. And, in either role, he is a hunted fugitive, sought by both the Police and the Federal Government. With the aid and assistance of reporter Jean Ashley (Anne Nagel) and his police partner, Pat Flannagan (Clancy Cooper), Barton manages to round up the ring, locate its secret code and destroy the most serious sabotage effort ever planned by Hitler agents in America. Plus, at the end of every chapter, a series of lessons on code, written and directed by code expert Henry Lysing, was given, and a book called "The Secret C O D E Digest" (by Mr. Lysing) was on sale in the lobby for ten cents.
97.
Perils of the Royal Mounted (1942) as Photography
98.
Captain Midnight (1942) as Photography
99.
Iron Claw, The (1941) as Photography
100.
Green Archer, The (1941) as Photography
Columbia's 12th serial of 57 total (following 1940's "Deadwood Dick" and ahead of 1941's "White Eagle") is another of director's James Horne's "classics" where he evidently figured that the same reactions that served him well in Laurel and Hardy films would work well in action serials where he has all hands, heroes and villains alike, doing some kind of over-the top "take", no matter the situation. This loose adaptation of an Edgar Wallace story finds Michael Bellamy (Kenne Duncan in his Kenneth Duncan period) inheriting Garr Castle, but his brother, Abel Bellamy (James Craven, as usual making Oil-Can Harry look smooth), has him imprisoned unjustly and moves into the castle himself. When Michael's wife, Elaine Bellamy (Dorothy Fay), fails to return after visiting Abel, her sister Valerie Howett (Iris Meredith), accompanied by their father, Parker Howett (Forrest Taylor) and private detective Spike Holland (Victor Jory, who even when playing the lead hero gets a villain's name), rent an adjoining estate, determined to investigate the case. Abel is afraid they will discover his association with a gang of jewel thieves and desperately - with Horne directing and Craven emoting, desperate is the only word - tries to have them all killed, and anybody else that might be standing around wondering how ten henchmen could fit in a six-passenger car. Each attempt is thwarted by the sudden appearance of the mysterious Green Archer, who is always there with his deadly bow and arrows whenever needed. It takes Abel most of the 15 chapters before he succeeds in capturing Spike, Valerie and Mr. Howett, but the shadow of the Green Archer's feathered Robin-Hood cap is on one of the walls of Garr Castle, and moving in.
101.
Spider Returns, The (1941) as Photography
Columbia's 14th serial (between "White Eagle" and "The Iron Claw") and the second serial based upon the character in the pulp magazine from Street and Smith "The Spider Magazine." Some sources, evidently based on their knowledge that L. Ron Hubbard and Norvell Page wrote stories for that magazine, have incorrectly credited them as being writers of this serial. The only serial that L. Ron Hubbard wrote was 1938's "The Secret of Treasure Island" filmed by Columbia, and the only connection Page has is that he wrote stories about the character in the magazine. Chapter One, "The Stolen Plans", has a gang of saboteurs, led by The Gargoyle, a mysterious and powerful agent for an unnamed country, playing havoc with National Defense projects. Socialite Richard Wentworth (Warren Hull), alias the Spider, returns to continue his crusade against the underworld. Wentworth calls a meeting of the nation's biggest business men, but the Gargoyle's men disrupt it with a tear-gas bomb. Chasing after them, Wentworth is taken prisoner and placed aboard an airplane. The pilot sets it afire and bails out, with Wentworth unconscious in the plunging-to-earth airplane as the first episode ends. Knox Manning asking if this is the end is easily answered by those who knew this was a 15 chapter serial, and that neither The Spider (in chapter two) nor Blinky McQuade (in chapter four) had yet made an entrance. The quest by Wentworth/Spider/McQuade to learn the identity of the Gargoyle isn't helped any by the fact that he is one of the businessnmen in attendance at every meeting Wentworth calls to discuss his future plans. Based on pure fun, this is one of the, to use a relative term, best of the James W. Horne-directed serials, but the absence of James Craven foaming at the mouth and screaming at the henchmen - "Idiots! Idiots! I'm surrounded by idiots!" - is sorely missed.
102.
Shadow, The (1940) as Photography
Columbia's 9th serial, slotted between "Overland With Kit Carson" and "Terry and the Pirates", was intended to have Lorna Gray in the role played by Veda Ann Borg, and to have been co-directed by D. Ross Lederman and Norman Deming. The credits specified the serial was "Based upon stories published in "The Shadow Magazine", while the ads proclaimed it to be "right out of the air waves and magazine stories." What appeared was a mixture of both with Lamont Cranston the true identity of The Shadow, although Lamont Cranston was only an occasional disguise of the pulp magazine Shadow. The hypnotic invisibility of the radio character was completely ignored, as was the almost invisible "Living Shadow" of the pulps.(In the serial, the only invisible man (The Black Tiger) was the villain, as even James Horne probably realized that six to ten henchmen taking orders from an invisible man was more plausible then six to ten henchman falling all over the place from unseen blows delivered by an invisible hero. Actually, based on how he directed serials, Horne would have most likely been in favor of henchies Charles King and Kit Guard exchanging punches with thin air.) Margot Lane (Veda Ann Borg) was a radio-only character until 1941 when she was picked up by the magazine and also the comic books. Police Commissioner Weston (Frank LaRue) and Inspector Cardona (Edward Peil) were characters who had appeared both in the radio series and the magazine, while Harry Vincent (Roger Moore II), used here as The Shadow and Cranston's chauffeur, general assistant and gofer, was from the pulp stories. Anybody watching the serial and expecting to hear Jory ask "who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men" had best bring a sack lunch and prepare for a long wait. The best line in the film, both in delivery and circumstances, comes when head henchie Flint (Jack Ingram) advises his hapless,clueless but always-game cohorts that "The Black Tiger IS REALLY mad this time." Horne utilized Richard Cramer, from Horne's Laurel and Hardy days, as the "voice" of The Black Tiger, and Cramer read it with over-the-top ripeness from beginning to end, and one almost expects assistant-head henchie Williams (Eddie Fetherston) to ask Flint how he could discern any degree of difference in the Black Tiger's attitude. That said, the plot begins with dynamited railroads, wrecked airplanes and blown-up industrial plants, with the clear message that nothing is safe from the machinations of the secret mastermind of the underworld known only as The Black Tiger. The man has plans to take over everything. While the police make only a few futile arrests, Lamont Cranston,noted scientist and criminologist, assumes the guise of a black-garbed, masked figure (The Shadow) to combat this evil. The police,of course, assume that The Shadow and The Black Tiger are one and the same. Cranston works with Police Commissioner Weston and a group of solid citizen businessmen including Joseph Rand (Charles K. French), Gilbert Hill (Gordon Hart), Stanford Marshall (Robert Fiske), Turner (J. Paul Jones) and Stephen Prescott (Griff Barnett), and somewhere in nearly every chapter Cranston, Weston, Cardona and these solid citizens gather at The Cobalt Club and Cranston brings them up to date on the next steps to rid the city of The Black Tiger. Since one of the solid citizens is actually The Black Tiger, these meetings, for the most part, are counter-productive.
103.
Deadwood Dick (1940) as Photography
Columbia's 11th serial (between "Terry and the Pirates" and "The Green Archer") and the first western serial that James W. Horne solo-directed. The standard one-man-to-a-hoss and nobody walks rule of Westerns tended to cramp Horne's usual style of directing, in that he wasn't able to pour six or seven henchies into a four-door sedan and have them come tumbling out like the clowns at a circus, and the suprise with those familiar with his serials is that he didn't have all the henchmen riding around in a stagecoach or wagon. And, since they usually stayed on their horse, he was unable to have them rounding a corner on foot at an angle, freeze in surprise with their arms thrust over their heads, do a couple of takes and hot-foot it stage left for an alarmed feet-do-your-stuff exit. The character of "Deadwood Dick" in this serial is just a name that had a ring to it, was not intended to be based on the real-life "Deadwood Dick" in any manner, and those who delight in pointing out that the real "Deadwood Dick" was a black man and Columbia didn't know what they were doing miss an obvious point; the Columbia writers most likely knew that, but they weren't writing a factual history of the West and their fictional character could be what they wanted him to be. And was. That he ended up being played by the dullest actor (Don Douglas) ever to essay the lead role in a serial (at least until Republic came up with the likes of Bill Henry and Harry Lauter as serial leads) probably wasn't something they planned. This one had a little promise with veteran western actor Lane Chandler as "Wild Bill Hickok" but that promise soon faded with Hickok's demise in chapter one of this 15-chapter serial, where a renegade band led by a mysterious, masked character known as "The Skull" is terrorizing the town of Deadwood in the territory of Dakota. Dick Stanley (Don Douglas), editor of the Dakota Pioneer Press and a leading member of the Statehood For Dakota committee, is, unknown to his fellow townsmen and committee members, the equally mysterious Deadwood Dick, who is fighting The Skull and his gang. This makes everything about even as, unknown to Stanley, fellow-committeeman banker Transon Drew (Ed Cassidy) is The Skull. Well, actually, The Skull is a bit ahead as his "speaking voice" in costume is that of Forrest Taylor, who is nowhere in sight among the suspected citizens. Frank Butler, Stanley's "star' reporter is killed when he discovers that The Skull has plans to build an mpire of his own, and this also raises the possibility that Butler's sister, Anne (Lorna Gray), is also in danger. Chapter One ends with Deadwood Dick involved in a fight on a railroad handcar (filled with dynamite, naturally) with Jack McCall (Karl Hackett), the slayer of Wild Bill Hickok (Lane Chandler), and the handcar crashes to the bottom of a deep gorge and crashes...and explodes. Stanley/Deadwood Dick faces 13 more cliffhangers (mainly because he keeps letting Drew in on his plans to capture The Skull),before he unmasks The Skull in Chapter 15, "The Deadwood Express," Most of the action footage involving the Deadwood Dick character shows up again in 1954's "Riding With Buffalo Bill", where Marshall Reed as Buffalo Bill sans goatee, rides around in Deadwood Dick's costume.

Film Production - Video (feature film)

104.
Labor Day (2013)
During Labor Day weekend in a small New Hampshire town, a woman invites a mysterious stranger into the home she shares with her young son.

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