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Julie Brown

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Also Known As: Julie Ann Brown Died:
Born: August 31, 1954 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Burbank, California, USA Profession: singer, actor, voice actor, songwriter, screenwriter, producer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Julie Brown is an original: a daffy West Coast Judy Holliday; a comedienne who has suffered many roadblocks in her rise to fame. Born and raised in California's San Fernando Valley, Brown's screen persona encapsulates all the dizzy selfishness and amorality of the "valley girl". Brown got her training in San Francisco's American Conservatory Theater, where she met future collaborators Charlie Coffey and Terrence McNally (the latter who briefly became her husband should not be confused with the playwright of the same name). Originally a stand-up comic ("It's a mean atmosphere. Comedians, to me, look very needy"), Brown parlayed her talent into a pop career as an MTV hostess and released two hilarious albums of original music: "Goddess in Progress" and "Trapped in the Body of a White Girl". Brown spent the early 1980s writing variety specials for Alan Thicke and doing comedy turns on stand-up specials. Her deft rock parodies ("The Homecoming Queen's Got a Gun", "I Like 'em Big and Stupid") made her an underground hit by 1985, and, by 1989 she was hosting MTV's "Just Say Julie", which made sly fun of rock videos and the whole MTV generation. She tried two pilots which failed ("Julie Brown: The Show"...

Julie Brown is an original: a daffy West Coast Judy Holliday; a comedienne who has suffered many roadblocks in her rise to fame. Born and raised in California's San Fernando Valley, Brown's screen persona encapsulates all the dizzy selfishness and amorality of the "valley girl". Brown got her training in San Francisco's American Conservatory Theater, where she met future collaborators Charlie Coffey and Terrence McNally (the latter who briefly became her husband should not be confused with the playwright of the same name). Originally a stand-up comic ("It's a mean atmosphere. Comedians, to me, look very needy"), Brown parlayed her talent into a pop career as an MTV hostess and released two hilarious albums of original music: "Goddess in Progress" and "Trapped in the Body of a White Girl".

Brown spent the early 1980s writing variety specials for Alan Thicke and doing comedy turns on stand-up specials. Her deft rock parodies ("The Homecoming Queen's Got a Gun", "I Like 'em Big and Stupid") made her an underground hit by 1985, and, by 1989 she was hosting MTV's "Just Say Julie", which made sly fun of rock videos and the whole MTV generation. She tried two pilots which failed ("Julie Brown: The Show" CBS, 1989; and "The Julie Show" ABC, 1991), as well as guesting on "Newhart" as Buffy Denver, a ditsy TV host. Her sketch comedy series, "The Edge" (Fox, 1992-93), got good reviews but died swiftly.

Brown's film career has been a long struggle. She played bits in "Any Which Way You Can" and "Bloody Birthday" (both 1980), "The Incredible Shrinking Woman" (1981) and "Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment" (1985) before finding a producer for "Earth Girls are Easy" (1989), a musical sci-fi comedy she co-wrote with McNally and Coffey. She was bounced from the lead (replaced by Geena Davis) after having done twelve rewrites of the script; she wound up playing second banana Candy Pink, owner of the Curl Up & Dye beauty salon. Since then her big-screen career has been a mix of medium parts in tiny films ("The Spirit of '76" 1990; "Shakes the Clown" 1992; "Nervous Ticks" and "Raining Stones" both 1993) and smaller roles in bigger films (a voice-over in "A Goofy Movie", and a tiny part in the hit "Clueless", both 1995).

Brown's biggest success to date came in 1991, when she produced, co-wrote and starred in a Showtime television special that did to Madonna what Madonna has tried to do to Marilyn Monroe: turned the image inside out. Only "Medusa: Dare to Be Truthful" is delivered with a refreshing savage wit. Brown tore into her role with ferocious intensity and glee, assaulting stardom even as she herself goes for the brass ring (typical Medusa: "My money has money, I've had sex with everybody I want, and yet I am totally, totally alone. It is devastating"). Her follow-up, an uneven TV-movie, "National Lampoon's Attack of the 5 Ft. 2 In. Women" (Showtime, 1994), had the misfortune to be broadcast the same night as Barbra Streisand's HBO concert and went unseen by nearly everyone.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  National Lampoon's Attack of the 5 Ft. 2 In. Women (1994) Director ("Tonya: The Battle Of Wounded Knee")

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 My Santa (2013)
2.
 Wish List (2010)
3.
4.
 Boxboarders! (2008)
5.
 Like Mike (2002) New Age Mother
6.
 Shadow Hours (2000) Speaker
7.
 Plump Fiction (1998) Mimi
8.
 Bug Buster (1998)
9.
 Spy Hard (1996) Cigarette Girl
10.
 Goofy Movie, A (1995) Voice Of Lisa
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Raised in the Los Angeles, area
:
In late 1970s, met collaborators Charlie Coffey and Terrence McNally in San Francisco
1980:
Performed as a stand-up comedian
1980:
Made film debut in "Any Which Way You Can"
1984:
Released first album, "Goddess in Progress"
1989:
Starred in TV comedy show, "Just Say Julie" (MTV)
1989:
Co-starred in and co-wrote feature "Earth Girls are Easy"
1991:
Spoofed Madonna in "Medusa: Dare to Be Truthful", a Showtime special
1992:
Starred in sketch comedy series "The Edge" (Fox)
1994:
Provided character voice of Saleen on the animated series "Aladdin"
1995:
Cast in the spoof "Plump Fiction"; portrayed Mimi, a character based on Uma Thurman's role in "Pulp Fiction"
:
Served as a writer and producer for the sitcom "Clueless" (ABC, 1996-1997; UPN, 1997-1999); also made appearances as Coach Diemer and directed episodes
2000:
Co-wrote, executive produced and starred in the Comedy Central series "Strip Mall"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

San Fernando Valley College: San Fernando , California -
American Conservatory Theatre: San Francisco , California -

Notes

Not to be confused with 'Downtown' Julie Brown, former MTV veejay and TV host.

"My poor husband, when they find out he's married to me, they assume we must live like psychos, having cocaine with Jack Nicholson. But I just want to be in my house with my baby and husband, going to movies, walking my baby in the park. In my real life, I'm much straighter. It's really cool to be able to exorcise all of your demons in your work." --Julie Brown in USA Today, August 18, 1994

Companions close complete companion listing

husband:
Terrence McNally. Screenwriter, comedy writer. Married in 1983; divorced in 1987; not to be confused with the playwright.
companion:
Penn Jillette. Magician, comedian, writer. Together 14 months in late 1980s.
companion:
David Mirkin. Producer. Dating 1991; met c. 1981 while doing stand-up comedy; executive producer of Fox Television's "Get a Life" and "The Simpsons".

Family close complete family listing

father:
Leonard Brown. TV technician. Retired.
mother:
Celia Brown. Secretary.

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