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Richard Brooks

Richard Brooks

  • Something Of Value (1957) October 10 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958) October 27 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Brute Force (1947) November 06 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Light Touch, The (1952) November 06 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Blackboard Jungle (1955) November 07 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
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Also Known As: Died: March 11, 1992
Born: May 18, 1912 Cause of Death: congestive heart failure
Birth Place: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Profession: Writer ...
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NOTES

"Called 'God's angry man' by fellow writer Fay Kanin, Brooks frequently made films exposing social and moral conditions he deplored, alternating these with weighty literary properties and the occasional romance or comedy. Peter O'Toole called him 'the man who lived at the top of his voice.'" --Todd McCarthy in Brooks' obituary in Variety. March 16, 1992.

Brooks has defended his alteration of literary works for his films: "The novel and the screen are very different story-telling media. Short of putting the book in front of a camera and filming the text direct, page for page, any novel must necessarily undergo critical changes. Indeed, one hallmark of a good novel is the fact that it cannot be made into a good picture without changes. And it is equally true that a novel filmed scene for scene will not be a good movie. Nor would a good film make a good novel if it were literally and painstakingly transformed to the written word." --quoted in "Hollywood Directors 1941-76", edited by Richard Koszarski (1977)

"One of the most common complaints is that screenwriters--or directors, or producers--oversimplify everything, especially motivation and the delineation of character. . . . It is difficult for authors who have never written for or made, or studied, pictures, to realize how precious screen time is, and how swiftly things can be gotten over to an audience that is looking at moving pictures." --Richard Brooks quoted in "Hollywood Directors 1941-76", edited by Richard Koszarski (1977)

"The most important thing in the whole script is structure. You can go to the stage and shoot a scene with the right structure whether you've got the best cameraman or not. But you can have the best cameraman in the world and if you have no structure you've got shit." --Richard Brooks in 1990, quoted in his obituary in The Hollywood Reporter March 12, 1992.

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