skip navigation
Mel Brooks

Mel Brooks

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (2)

Recent DVDs

 
 

To Be Or Not To Be DVD "To Be or Not to Be" (1983) is a well-designed comedic tale of a Polish acting... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Robots DVD Root for the little guy in this animated feature from the team that brought you... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

High Anxiety DVD Mel Brooks is at his comedic best in this hilarious spoof of all things... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

History Of The World, Part I... "It's good to be the king." Mel Brooks turns his love of film parody to... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

The Mel Brooks Collection... This indispensable 8-disc set collects eight of Mel Brooks' comedic... more info $59.98was $59.98 Buy Now

Robin Hood: Men In Tights... What he did for westerns in "Blazing Saddles" (1974) and horror films in "Young... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now



Also Known As: Melvin Kaminsky, Melvin Brooks Died:
Born: June 28, 1926 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Brooklyn, New York, USA Profession: director, actor, producer, screenwriter, comedian, lyricist

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A certifiable legend - with an emphasis on the "certifiable" - in the entertainment industry, Mel Brooks was an Oscar, Emmy, Golden Globe and Tony-winning creator and performer of some of the biggest comedy hits on television, in film, and on Broadway. He got his start penning gags for Sid Caesar on the legendary "Your Show of Shows" (NBC, 1950-54) before developing his own series, "Get Smart" (NBC/CBS, 1965-1970). He soon graduated to directing films and turned out a string of uproarious and bawdy parodies of Hollywood genres, including "Young Frankenstein" (1974), "Blazing Saddles" (1974), and "High Anxiety" (1977) - all considered classics by anyone's standards. His first theatrical feature, "The Producers" (1968), later served as the basis for a hit Broadway musical, which earned Brooks and his cast and crew a record 12 Tony Awards in 2001. With the success of the big screen adaptation of "Get Smart" (2008), more than 40 years after the premiere of the original series, it was clear that the mad mind of Mel Brooks still packed a timeless comedic punch.

A certifiable legend - with an emphasis on the "certifiable" - in the entertainment industry, Mel Brooks was an Oscar, Emmy, Golden Globe and Tony-winning creator and performer of some of the biggest comedy hits on television, in film, and on Broadway. He got his start penning gags for Sid Caesar on the legendary "Your Show of Shows" (NBC, 1950-54) before developing his own series, "Get Smart" (NBC/CBS, 1965-1970). He soon graduated to directing films and turned out a string of uproarious and bawdy parodies of Hollywood genres, including "Young Frankenstein" (1974), "Blazing Saddles" (1974), and "High Anxiety" (1977) - all considered classics by anyone's standards. His first theatrical feature, "The Producers" (1968), later served as the basis for a hit Broadway musical, which earned Brooks and his cast and crew a record 12 Tony Awards in 2001. With the success of the big screen adaptation of "Get Smart" (2008), more than 40 years after the premiere of the original series, it was clear that the mad mind of Mel Brooks still packed a timeless comedic punch.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
2.
3.
  Life Stinks (1991) Director
4.
  Spaceballs (1987) Director
5.
6.
  High Anxiety (1977) Director
7.
  Silent Movie (1976) Director
8.
  Blazing Saddles (1974) Director
9.
  Young Frankenstein (1974) Director
10.
  The Twelve Chairs (1970) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
2.
 Robots (2005) Voice
3.
 Producers, The (2005)
5.
 Screw Loose (2000)
7.
8.
 Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1995) Professor Van Helsing
10.
 Little Rascals, The (1994) Mr Welling
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Worked variously as jazz drummer, stand-up comedian, handyman and social director for a Catskills resort after World War II
1949:
Worked as sketch writer for Sid Caesar, collaborating on television shows Like "Your Show of Shows" (NBC, 1950-1954)
1954:
Made film writing debut with "New Faces" (sketches)
1957:
Co-wrote the book for the Broadway musical "Shinbone Alley"
1960:
Earned a Grammy nomination with Carl Reiner for Best Spoken Word Comedy for <i>2,000 Years</i>
1961:
Nominated for Best Comedy Performance Grammy for <i>2,000 and One Years</i>
1962:
Wrote the book for the Broadway musical "All-American"
1963:
Created and narrated first film, the cartoon "The Critic"; won Academy Award for Best Short Subject
1963:
Nominated for Grammy Award for Best Comedy Performance for <i>At the Cannes Film Festival</i>
1965:
With Buck Henry, created the Emmy Award-winning "Get Smart" (NBC, CBS)
1967:
Won Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing Achievement in a Variety Comedy for "The Sid Caesar, Imogene Coca, Carl Reiner, Howard Morris Special" (CBS)
1968:
First film as director and screenwriter, "The Producers"; also composed song "Springtime for Hitler"; won Academy Award for Best Originaly Screenplay
1970:
Wrote, directed and starred in the comedy "The Twelve Chairs"
1974:
Played Governor Lepetomane and Indian Chief in the Western movie parody "Blazing Saddles"; also co-wrote and directed
1974:
Wrote and directed the horror movie spoof "Young Frankenstein"; earned Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay
1977:
First film as producer, "High Anxiety"; also acted in and directed
1979:
Formed production company Brooksfilms Ltd.
1979:
Made a cameo in "The Muppet Movie"
1980:
Served as uncredited executive producer of "The Elephant Man," a heart-wrenching drama about a man with physical deformities; film was nominated for Best Picture Academy Award
1981:
Played various roles, including Moses and King Louis XVI in "History of the World, Part I"; also directed, wrote, and produced
1982:
Served as uncredited executive producer on the Frances Farmer biopic "Frances"
1982:
Executive produced the film "My Favorite Year," loosely inspired by the behind-the-scenes action at "Your Show of Shows"
1986:
Served as executive producer on a successful remake of the 1958 sci-fi flick "The Fly" and the less-than-stellar fantasy "Solarbabies"
1987:
Played President Skroob and Yogurt in the "Star Wars" spoof "Spaceballs"; also co-wrote, directed, and produced
1989:
Served as uncredited executive producer on "The Fly II"
1991:
Starred in, directed, and wrote the unpopular comedy "Life Stinks"
1992:
Executive produced the misfire "The Vagrant"
1993:
Made rare TV sitcom appearance on NBC's "Frasier"
1993:
Featured as Rabbi Tuckman in "Robin Hood: Men in Tights"; also directed, produced and co-wrote
1994:
Played Mr. Welling in the big-screen version of "The Little Rascals"
1995:
Featured as vampire hunter Abraham Van Helsing in "Dracula: Dead and Loving It"; also directed, wrote and produced
1995:
Played himself on an episode of the Fox animated series "The Simpsons"
1996:
Played recurring role of Paul's Uncle Phil on the hit NBC sitcom "Mad About You"; won three Emmy Awards for appearances
1997:
With Carl Reiner, wrote the book <i>The 2000 Year Old Man in the Year 2000</i>
1999:
With Reiner won Grammy for Spoken Comedy Album for the recording of <i>The 2000 Year Old Man in 2000</i>
2000:
Adapted his Oscar-winning screenplay "The Producers" for the stage; earned critical kudos and a record 15 Tony Award nominations
2005:
Voiced master inventor Bigweld in the animated feature "Robots"
2005:
Once again brought "The Producers" back to the big screen, originally a 1968 movie, which was adapted into a Tony award winning stage musical, starring Matthew Broderick and Nathan Lane; film earned a Golden Globe nomination for Best Picture and a Grammy nomination for Best Song for "There's Nothing Like a Show on Broadway"
2007:
Adapted his 1987 sci-fi spoof "Spaceballs" into "Spaceballs: The Animated Series" (G4 TV); wrote, directed and voiced two characters, President Skroob and Yogurt
2007:
Adapted his 1974 film "Young Frankenstein" into a Broadway musical
2008:
Credited for creating characters in the feature remake of "Get Smart," starring Steve Carell as Maxwell Smart and Anne Hathaway as Agent 99
2012:
Announced as recipient of AFI Lifetime Achievement Award
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Eastern District High School: Brooklyn , New York - 1944

Notes

With his 2001 Tony wins for the book and score for "The Producers", Brooks joined the elite club of Helen Hayes, John Gielgud, Rita Moreno, Audrey Hepburn, Richard Rodgers and Marvin Hamlisch as one of the few individuals to earn all four of the major entertainment prizes (Oscar, Tony, Emmy, Grammy) in competition. Later that year, Mike Nichols joined the group when he earned an Emmy for "Wit".

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Florence Baum. Married in 1950; divorced.
wife:
Anne Bancroft. Actor. Married on August 5, 1964; second wife; acted with Brooks in "To Be or Not to Be" (1983).

Family close complete family listing

daughter:
Stephanie Brooks. Born in 1951; mother, Florence Baum.
son:
Nicholas Brooks. Born in 1952; mother, Florence Baum.
son:
Edward Brooks. Born in 1953; mother, Florence Baum.
son:
Maximilian Brooks. Born in 1972; mother, Anne Bancroft.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute