skip navigation
Jeff Bridges

Jeff Bridges

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

 
 

Seabiscuit DVD This inspirational sports drama tells the real life story of the racing career... more info $12.98was $12.98 Buy Now

A Dog Year DVD Based on the memoir by New York Times best-selling author Jon Katz, Oscar®... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

The Men Who Stare At Goats... This hilarious comedy based on true events stars a host of Hollywood's top... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

K-Pax DVD "K-Pax" (2001) is a thought-provoking drama and mystery. Based on the novel by... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

The Door In The Floor DVD "The Door in the Floor" (2004) is a poignant and explosive drama, based on the... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

American Heart DVD Oscar-winning actor Jeff Bridges and Edward Furlong star in "American Heart"... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now



Also Known As: Jeffrey Leon Bridges Died:
Born: December 4, 1949 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Los Angeles, California, USA Profession: actor, producer, musician, photographer, singer, songwriter, painter

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

For decades, referring to Jeff Bridges as one of Hollywood's "most underrated actors" was something of a cliché, as this second-generation performer was hailed for eschewing flashy blockbuster roles in favor of more substantive characters. Bridges was rarely a box-office champ, but he did build a loyal following for his naturalistic performances in "The Fabulous Baker Boys" (1989), "The Big Lebowski" (1998) and "Crazy Heart" (2009). Though he started as a child actor alongside father Lloyd and brother Beau, he earned acclaim on his own with highly praised turns in John Huston's "Fat City" (1972), Peter Bogdanovich's "The Last Picture Show" (1972) and "Thunderbolt and Lightfoot", co-starring Clint Eastwood. After enjoying a box-office hit with "King Kong" (1976), Bridges starred in one of his better-known films, "Tron" (1982), before earning high praise as the alien in "Starman" (1984). Following "Against All Odds" (1984) and "Jagged Edge" (1985), he was a cynical radio-show host in "The Fisher King" (1991) and received some of his best notices as the survivor of a plane crash in "Fearless" (1993). He went on to play White Russian-swilling slacker The Dude - his most recognized character - in "The...

For decades, referring to Jeff Bridges as one of Hollywood's "most underrated actors" was something of a cliché, as this second-generation performer was hailed for eschewing flashy blockbuster roles in favor of more substantive characters. Bridges was rarely a box-office champ, but he did build a loyal following for his naturalistic performances in "The Fabulous Baker Boys" (1989), "The Big Lebowski" (1998) and "Crazy Heart" (2009). Though he started as a child actor alongside father Lloyd and brother Beau, he earned acclaim on his own with highly praised turns in John Huston's "Fat City" (1972), Peter Bogdanovich's "The Last Picture Show" (1972) and "Thunderbolt and Lightfoot", co-starring Clint Eastwood. After enjoying a box-office hit with "King Kong" (1976), Bridges starred in one of his better-known films, "Tron" (1982), before earning high praise as the alien in "Starman" (1984). Following "Against All Odds" (1984) and "Jagged Edge" (1985), he was a cynical radio-show host in "The Fisher King" (1991) and received some of his best notices as the survivor of a plane crash in "Fearless" (1993). He went on to play White Russian-swilling slacker The Dude - his most recognized character - in "The Big Lebowski" and later excelled as a devil-may-care president in "The Contender" (2000). Having been a real-life racehorse owner in "Seabiscuit" (2003) and a comic-book villain in "Iron Man" (2008), Bridges won the Oscar for "Crazy Heart" and was nominated again for his role as the cantankerous Rooster Cogburn in "True Grit" (2010). Thanks to his everyman qualities, audiences accepted Bridges in a wide range of genres, where his talent for complex, morally ambiguous characters was so strong that the actor was often accused of playing himself.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Giver, The (2014)
2.
 R.I.P.D. (2013)
3.
 Casting By (2013)
4.
 Seventh Son, The (2013)
5.
6.
 True Grit (2010)
7.
 Tron: Legacy (2010)
8.
 Crazy Heart (2009)
9.
 Dog Year, A (2009)
10.
 Open Road, The (2009)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1950:
First film appearance at age four months in "The Company She Keeps" as the infant in Jane Greer's arms
1957:
Appeared on father Lloyd Bridges' syndicated TV series "Sea Hunt"
:
Was an occasional performer with brother Beau on "The Lloyd Bridges Show" (CBS)
1964:
Toured New England in stock company production of "Anniversary Waltz"
:
Fulfilled military service requirement in the Coast Guard reserve
1969:
Acted in the NBC movie, "Silent Night, Lonely Night" playing his father's character as a young man
1969:
Sang his own song, "Lost in Space" on the soundtrack for the film "John and Mary"
1970:
First significant acting role in "Halls of Anger" playing a white student bused to a black school
1971:
Breakthrough film role, playing Texas roughneck Duane Jackson in Peter Bogdanovich's "The Last Picture Show"; garnered first Best Supporting Actor Academy Award nomination
1972:
Appeared in the obscure indie film "The Yin and the Yang of Mr. Go" written and directed by Burgess Meredith
1973:
Offered a supporting turn in John Frankenheimer's "The Iceman Cometh"; adapted from the Eugene O'Neill play
1974:
Received second Best Supporting Actor Academy Award nomination for his role in Michael Cimino's "Thunderbolt and Lightfoot"
1975:
First collaboration with actress, Sally Field in Bob Rafelson's "Stay Hungry"
1976:
Co-starred with Jessica Lange and Charles Grodin in the remake of the 1933 classic, "King Kong"
1979:
Acted in two films directed by William Richert, "Winter Kills" and "The American Success Company"
1980:
Re-teamed with Cimino for the disastrous "Heaven's Gate"
1981:
Offered a fine performance as the aimless friend of a boozy, belligerant Vietnam vet (John Heard) in "Cutter's Way"
1982:
Re-teamed with Sally Field for the comedy, "Kiss Me Goodbye"
1982:
Portrayed Kevin Flynn, a video game programmer in the sci-fi cult classic, "Tron"
1984:
Appeared with Rachel Ward in "Against All Odds" a remake of the 1947 film noir "Out of the Past"
1984:
Received first Best Actor Academy Award nomination for his portrayal of an Earth-bound alien in "Starman"
1985:
Played a wealthy publishing magnate accused of murdering his wife in the thriller "Jagged Edge"
1986:
Co-starred with Jane Fonda in Sidney Lumet's "The Morning After"
1988:
Played the title role in Francis Ford Coppola's "Tucker: The Man and His Dream"; also starred his father Lloyd Bridges
1989:
Starred opposite brother Beau and Michelle Pfeiffer in "The Fabulous Baker Boys"
1990:
Reprised the role of Duane Jackson in the poorly received sequel "Texasville"; directed by Bogdanovich
1991:
Portrayed a radio shock-jock who seeks redemption by helping a homeless man (Robin Williams) whose life he inadvertently shattered in Terry Gilliam's "The Fisher King"
1992:
Producing debut, "American Heart"; also starred as an ex-convict trying to do right by his son (Edward Furlong)
1993:
Considered to be one of his best performances to date, as a plane-crash survivor in Peter Weir's "Fearless"
1994:
Received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame
1994:
Once again collaborated with his father in Stephen Hopkins' "Blown Away"
1996:
Starred opposite Barbra Streisand (who also directed) in "The Mirror Has Two Faces"
1996:
Executive produced Showtime's "Hidden in America" starring his brother Beau
1997:
Displayed a humorous side as 'The Dude' in the Coen Brothers' "The Big Lebowski"
1999:
Portrayed tightly wound, slightly paranoid history professor in the thriller "Arlington Road"
1999:
Played a successful Hollywood screenwriter who introduces his friend (Albert Brooks) to "The Muse"
1999:
Released first solo album, <i>Be Here Soon</i> and launched Internet Web site (www.jeffbridges.com)
2000:
Received fourth Academy Award nomination, playing the American President in Rod Lurie's "The Contender"
2001:
Starred as a psychiatrist treating a man convinced he's from another planet in "K-Pax"
2003:
Narrated the documentary "Lost in La Mancha"
2003:
Co-starred as an influential millionaire in the inspiring feature "Seabiscuit"
2004:
Co-starred with Kim Basinger, playing a children's book author in John Irving's "The Door in the Floor"; earned an Independent Spirit Award nomination for Best Male Lead
2006:
Co-starred in "The Amateurs," an independent comedy about a sleepy town that comes together to film a porno
2006:
Re-teamed with director Terry Gilliam for "Tideland"
2007:
Voiced a washed-up old surfer named Big Z in the animated film, "Surf's Up"
2008:
Cast as Obadiah Stane, Starks' mentor in the marvel comcis' "Iron Man"
2008:
Joined the ensemble of "How to Lose Friends & Alienate People"
2009:
Co-starred with George Clooney in "The Men Who Stare At Goats"
2009:
Gave an Oscar winning performance as an alcoholic country music singer in "Crazy Heart"
2009:
Starred in HBO's "A Dog Year"; received an Emmy (2010) nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie
2010:
Reprised role of Kevin Flynn in the sequel, "TRON: Legacy"
2010:
Played Marshal Reuben J. 'Rooster' Cogburn in the Western written and directed by the Coen brothers, "True Grit"
2011:
Nominated for the 2011 Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role ("True Grit")
2011:
Nominated for the 2011 Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role
2011:
Nominated for the 2011 Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role
2013:
Played a tough supernatural lawman in "R.I.P.D."
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University High School: Los Angeles , California -
Herbert Berghof Studio: New York , New York -

Notes

Bridges heads his own production company called As Is Productions.

"Sometimes, just on his own, Jeff Bridges is enough to make a picture worth seeing. . . . He may be the most natural and least self-conscious screen actor who ever lived; physically, it's as if he had spent his life in the occupation of each character. He's the most American--the loosest--of all the young actors. . . If he has a profile, we're not aware of it. . . . Jeff Bridges just moves into a role and lives in it--so deep in it that the little things seem to come straight from the character's soul." --Pauline Kael, from The New Yorker review of "The Last American Hero (1973), quoted in "Jeff Bridges: Blast Action Hero" July 15, 1994.

"There are still waters that run very deep in him. On the set when we were working, he showed the ultimate respect of one actor for another. . . . He saw you, heard you and was totally repsonsive through every take." --Mercedes Ruehl discussing working with Bridges on "The Fisher King" in Los Angeles Times, September 24, 1991.

"It's time to recognize Mr. Bridges as the most underappreciated great actor of his generation. Although he approached this potentially showy role without fanfare or ostentation, he has managed to transform himself to an astonishing degree. Looking muscular and mean, sporting chest-length, unkempt hair and a prominent tattoo, he sheds all of the guileless optimism that once colored so many of his performances, instead becoming a sour, suspicious failure who seems lost beyond hope. . . ." --Janet Maslin, "Father and Son Find Each Other Again" [a review of "American Heart"], The New York Times, May 14, 1993.

"Look, I know there are articles about how underappreciated I am, how I'm not a big enough star. I've read them. But I FEEL appreciated. I'm having a GREAT career. I'm getting paid a lot of money. I'm getting a variety of roles. I'm doing what I want to do. What's the problem?" --Jeff Bridges quoted in Entertainment Weekly, July 15, 1994.

"I am lucky because I haven't had any huge box-office hits, and yet I'm able to work with great directors, actors and writers, Maybe it's because I don't have a strong screen persona. I try to play a mix of characters and to do a variety of films." --Bridges quoted in "Pistol-Packing Papa" by Michele Shapiro, Time Out New York, November 29-December 6, 1995.

Bridges has exhibited his paintings and photographs in galleries in Los Angeles and Montana.

"Somehow, he never became a s--theel actor. I've never, ever heard of him pulling a star turn, or showing any ego.

"He was a pro when I met him, and he's only gotten better with the years. I'd work with him on every picture if I could. What can I say? I love the guy." --Peter Bogdanovich, to Larry Worth in the New York Post, March 3, 1998.

"I certainly have taken my cue from my father as far as my approach to the work. He has a very strong work ethic. It was great seeing how he approached the work. When he's on the set and he makes everybody feel appreciated and respected and important, you just kind of pick up on that. Acting, because of my dad, came pretty easy to me. The hard part, getting your foot in the door, was kind of handled by my dad having a hit TV series. But I had made seven or eight movies before I really decided that acting was what I wanted to do."

"The turning point for me was really on 'The Iceman Cometh'. I'd just finished 'The Last American Hero'. Usually after a film, you have this feeling where you don't ever want to do it again. I was feeling like that, and then I got offered 'Iceman Cometh' the next week, with Robert Ryan, Lee Marvin, and Fredric March, directed by John Frankenheimer. And I said, 'Ya know, I'm too tired. I don't want to do it.' I felt like being lazy. Then Lamont Johnson, who directed 'The Last American Hero', called up and read me the riot act. He said, 'You call yourself an actor? You got this great opportunity and you just turn it down? You're totally crazy.' So I decided to do a little experiment on myself and work when I didn't feel like it because that's what pros are supposed to do, right? And it turned out to be a wonderful experience." --Bridges, to Jay Carr in the Boston Globe, March 1, 1998.

"My first memory of acting was being thrown off the Malibu pier in ice-cold water and having to recite my lines [for a guest spot on 'Sea Hunt' at age 8]. He [Lloyd Bridges] taught me all the basics of acting whan I was just a little kid. I remember him sitting me up on the bed and going through it all for hours at a time. He was definitely my teacher.

". . . We called my mother the General because she held it all together. My mom, being so grounded and having such a secure base, allowed my father to be a kite. She would hold the string and he'd go flying out into the wind. That's the example I take of how they did it." --Bridges, quoted in People, July 26, 1999.

"I've been writing music since I was a teenager and jamming with my buddies all through the years, and there was a while there much earlier on in my life when I thought I might pursue music as my career. I always take a guitar and keyboard to different movie [sets] and have always written songs." --From the Chicago Sun-Times, March 19, 2000.

Bridges on accusations that his album is a vanity project: "Some people will think that. I guess you could look at it that way. Vanity? I dig my music, I love to play music more than I love listening to it. I get so much joy from my music that I guess it is a vanity project. But the proof is in the album and everyone has to make their own assessment of it.

"The music comes from the same place as the acting. I also do ceramics, I paint, I dance, I sing -- I'm a creative person and this is just another outlet for me." --quoted in New York Post, February 25, 2000.

Jeff Bridges' official web site, which features his music and visual art pieces as well as commentary on his acting, is accessible via www.jeffbridges.com.

"I really like it the way it is. It's kind of great. Yes, there's a downside to, you know, fame and all that stuff not only can it hassle your private life but I think as far as the work goes I really enjoy kind of disappearing into the character, not having too strong a persona or to be so..."---Bridges on his level of fame to Larry King CNN November 16, 2003

"For a long while I kind of resisted going into acting, and part of that reason was that my dad [Lloyd Bridges] was a well-established actor, and I thought I was just getting work because my dad got me in the door. That's the toughest part about acting, I think, getting your foot in the door, and my father certainly handled some of that for me."---Bridges on getting into acting to Premiere July/August 2004

Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Candy Clark. Actor, model. Appeared together in "Fat City" (1972).
wife:
Susan Bridges. Photographer. Born c. 1954; married in 1977; Bridges spotted her at a Montana restaurant where she was waitressing while he was filming "Rancho Deluxe" c. 1975.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Lloyd Vernet Bridges. Actor. Active in film and TV from the early 1940s; starred in the popular TV adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1957-61) and appeared in films including "Home of the Brave" (1949), "High Noon" (1952), "The Goddess" (1958) and "Airplane!" (1980); died on March 10, 1998.
mother:
Dorothy Bridges. Former actor.
brother:
Beau Bridges. Actor. Born on December 9, 1941; has played leading roles in such films as "Gaily, Gaily" (1969) and "Norma Rae" (1978) and won three Emmy Awards for TV work.
brother:
Garrett Myles Bridges. Born in June 1948; died of sudden infant death syndrome in August 1948.
sister:
Lucinda Bridges. Painter. Born in 1953.
daughter:
Isabelle Annie Bridges. Born opn August 6, 1981.
daughter:
Jessica Lily Bridges. Born on June 14, 1983.
daughter:
Haley Roselouise Bridges. Born on October 17, 1985.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute