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AndrT Braugher

AndrT Braugher

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Also Known As: Andre Braugher, Andre K. Braugher Died:
Born: July 1, 1962 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Chicago, Illinois, USA Profession: actor, director

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Andre Braugher spent five critically acclaimed years playing zealous justice-seeker Detective Frank Pembleton on NBC's "Homicide" (NBC, 1993-99), where his character was the galvanizing, if hard-to-like, center of the ensemble drama. Naturally, the Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning actor was sought out to star in other television offerings, including the short-lived medical drama "Gideon's Crossing" (CBS, 2000-01), the buddy dramedy "Men of a Certain Age" (TNT, 2009-11) and the Emmy-winning miniseries, "Thief" (FX, 2005), in which he broke with his upstanding image to star as a morally conflicted high-stakes thief. The character-driven actor's flair for decisive confidence led to memorable film roles as men-in-charge in "10,000 Black Men Named George" (Showtime, 2002), "Poseidon" (2006) and "The Andromeda Strain" (A&E, 2008). For his commitment to three-dimensional characters and his high-caliber work in primetime and beyond, Braugher helped pave the way for African-American actors to be accepted in a much wider range of roles than ever before.

Andre Braugher spent five critically acclaimed years playing zealous justice-seeker Detective Frank Pembleton on NBC's "Homicide" (NBC, 1993-99), where his character was the galvanizing, if hard-to-like, center of the ensemble drama. Naturally, the Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning actor was sought out to star in other television offerings, including the short-lived medical drama "Gideon's Crossing" (CBS, 2000-01), the buddy dramedy "Men of a Certain Age" (TNT, 2009-11) and the Emmy-winning miniseries, "Thief" (FX, 2005), in which he broke with his upstanding image to star as a morally conflicted high-stakes thief. The character-driven actor's flair for decisive confidence led to memorable film roles as men-in-charge in "10,000 Black Men Named George" (Showtime, 2002), "Poseidon" (2006) and "The Andromeda Strain" (A&E, 2008). For his commitment to three-dimensional characters and his high-caliber work in primetime and beyond, Braugher helped pave the way for African-American actors to be accepted in a much wider range of roles than ever before.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Love Songs (1999) Director ("A Love Song For Dad")

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Outliving Emily (2014)
2.
 Gambler, The (2014)
3.
4.
 Salt (2010)
5.
 Passengers (2008)
6.
 Mist, The (2007)
7.
 Live! (2007)
9.
 Poseidon (2006)
10.
 Soldier's Girl (2003) Sgt. Carlos Diaz
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1990:
Played the title role in the TV movie "The Court-Martial of Jackie Robinson"
1998:
Played supporting role of a heavenly being in "City of Angels"
1999:
Featured in the Showtime dramatic trilogy "Love Songs," directing one segment and starring in another
2000:
Played a gay lawyer who becomes mixed up in a handgun-related incident in "It's the Rage/All the Rage"
2000:
Featured in the independent "Thick as Thieves," which premiered on HBO
2000:
Stared in the short "Louisville," which aired as part of the "Showtime Black Filmmaker Showcase"
2002:
Narrated the Motown-classics documentary "Standing in the Shadows of Motown"
2003:
Cast as Sergeant Carlos Diaz in the Showtime original movie "A Soldier's Girl," the true story of a young soldier beaten to death for falling in love with a transgendered nightclub performer
2006:
Played a veteran robber rounding up his team for a new heist in the FX drama "Thief"
2006:
Starred in director Wolfgang Petersen's remake of "The Poseidon Adventure"
2007:
Cast in the superhero sequel "Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer"
2009:
Co-starred with Ray Romano and Scott Bakula in the TNT's "Men of a Certain Age"
2012:
Played the commanding captain Marcus Chaplin on submarine-set thriller "Last Resort" (ABC)
2016:
Had a cameo as Captain Ray Holt on an episode of "New Girl"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

St Ignatius Prepatory School: Chicago , Illinois -
Stanford University: Stanford , California - 1984
The Juilliard School: New York , New York - 1988

Notes

"Homicide" creator Tom Fontana on Andre Braugher: "There are three kinds of actors. One is an actor you hire and he gives you nothing. Another gives you exactly what you've written. And the third takes what you give him and just completely soars with it. That's Andre. Andre is one of those actors who makes me think I'm a better writer than I really am." --quoted in the New York Times, February 2, 1994.

"The kind of roles I like to take are three-dimensional characters. Unusally when people call you in, it's 'the black character'. It's Paul or Tom, or Dick, the handsome black man. Meanwhile, all these other characters, who don't have meticulous or specific descriptions, I want to play those people because they have more to do, or they're more interesting, or they're more interesting to me. I'd like to play those characters, but I'm not called in for those characters." --Braugher to the New York Times, February 2, 1994.

Andre Braugher on becoming a household name: "The danger for me is I'll forget who I am and where I came from. I might begin to believe my own hype.

"I don't have a manager. I don't have a publicist. I don't want to go on 'The Tonight Show' and be all palsy-walsy with the host. I think I want to be rich but I don't want to be famous." --quoted in Entertainment Weekly, October 28, 1994.

Asked by USA Weekend (March 15-17, 1996) if he is interested in a full-time film career, Braugher responded: "If Hollywood were clamoring for Andre Braugher, I'd be working more. So I'm not deceived into thinking I have what it takes."

"I'm not interested in playing characters who are worried about being liked. We don't go through life being liked." --Andre Braugher quoted in Los Angeles Times, July 14, 1996.

"I'm black in America. On a daily basis, I'm reminded that I'm unwanted. It's just a fact of life. I was born without civil rights and I grew up angry. I'm not protected by my family or wealth or intelligence from the daily assaults that are inflicted on the dignity of black Americans everywhere in this country." --Braugher in the Los Angeles Times, July 14, 1996.

"He is so tough and smart and sure of himself that he intimidates everyone around him--including me." --"Homicide" producer Tom Fontana in People, September 2, 1996.

Braugher on his character's outlook-altering stroke in the series "Homicide": "I've been that detective for so many years that I reall need something new.

"Change is hard, but I'd like to [play] a man who's more appreciative. The quandary becomes that the audience really caught on to the character three years after we debuted, And they want their guy back." --quoted in TV Guide, December 28, 1996.

On his lack of comedic roles: "I don't think I'm really cut out for that! I try to choose projects that emphasize the human spirit. So I have not done a 'Booty Call'! But if I were handed a superb 'Booty Call' that explores the human spirit, maybe ..." --Braugher quoted in the San Francisco Examiner, April 7, 1998.

Braugher on putting his family before his work: "If my ambiton to become a 'movie star' became so great that I'd be willing to neglect my marriage and my role as a father, I would suffer the consequences. This is a business in which the divorce rate is very high, and very few people are on their first marriage." --quoted in Daily News, April 9, 1998.

According to Newsday (April 23, 1998), Braugher stopped watching television in the 1970s. "'Three's Company' ... that was my Waterloo. It's been a non-love affair for quite a long time. I think consequently I've been out of the loop on a lot of the fads that have come and gone".

Braugher on his criteria for success: "If you do a film and your experience is really terrible, and you suffer every conceivable reversal on it possible, you hate the experience--and it's a hit--do you feel any better about it? No. If you go there and you have a wonderful time, you learn things, you make the best friends, you feel yourself challenged in every way--and it's a bomb--do you feel any worse about it? No.

"So the only thing you can really take away from any movie that you make is the experience itself. And if you did it for the right reasons, and it turned out to be something that was valuable and profitable to you--as a person--then you have been in a successful movie." --quoted in Newsday, February 18, 1999.

"I'm not a chameleon. I'll never be known as one of those guys who people say, 'I didn't recognize him in that film.' But it's a quality that shines out, that people have found attractive. I don't know whether it would be a limitation to me in the course of my career." --Braugher quoted in The Dallas Morning News, February 21, 1999.

"TV and film are gigantic enterprises. There is no instant feedback. But in theater, if you're boring, the audience will fall asleep right in front of you. Every night, you have to create magic. It has its own type of danger--without actually having to go to war." --Braugher quoted in Daily News, May 3, 2000.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Ami Brabson. Actor, writer. Married in 1991; played his wife on "Homicide: Life on the Street".

Family close complete family listing

father:
Floyd Braugher. Heavy equipment operator.
mother:
Sally Braugher. Mail carrier.
son:
Michael Braugher. Born c. 1992; mother, Ami Brabson.
son:
Isaiah Braugher. Born c. 1996; mother, Ami Brabson.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

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