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Marlon Brando

Marlon Brando

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Also Known As: Died: July 1, 2004
Born: April 3, 1924 Cause of Death: lung condition
Birth Place: Omaha, Nebraska, USA Profession: Cast ...
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NOTES

"Brando's Terry Malloy is a shatteringly poignant portrait of an amoral, confused, illiterate citizen of the lower depths who is goaded into decency by love, hate and murder. His groping for words, use of the vernacular, care of his beloved pigeons, pugilist's walk and gestures and his discoveries of love and the immensity of the crimes around him are highlights of a beautiful and moving portrayal."---A. H. Weiler's review of "On the Waterfront", in The New York Times, July 30, 1954

"He's the most keenly aware, the most empathetical human being alive... He just knows. If you have a scar, physical or mental, he goes right to it. He doesn't want to, but he doesn't avoid it... He cannot be cheated or fooled. If you left the room he could be you."---Stella Adler quoted in Richard Schickel's "Brando: A Life in Our Times" (1991)

"This was the first of the many ritual beatings characters played by Brando would absorb in his films, punishment for being an outsider and sensitive, a hip messiah in the pop mythology of the time."---Richard Schickel

"Brando always was a weirdo, long before anyone heard of him. Surely his 'eccentricity' deepened with the passing years, but the overall evidence is that he consciously chose to stress that side of his nature less, not more, in his Sixties work... He is less self-consciously witty, less self-satirizing, than he was in the fat Fifties movies... when his spirits were up and he carried with him the feistiness of successs. He is also much less sexy than before, much less volatile than he was in his previous on-screen encounters with women. Indeed, it is impossible to recall a single romantic scene that had either the rapacious menace of 'Streetcar' or the insinuating seductiveness of his scenes with Eva Marie Saint in 'On the Waterfront.'"---Richard Schickel, In discussing Brando's bland, tame professionalism in his work during the 1960s

"We may treasure, as he does not, the moments he gave us, at the same time speculating about the ones he didn't give us, out of spite or goofiness or whatever has moved him to not move us. Looking at him now, one can't help recalling the illimitable promise of his youth and perhaps of our own, and the inevitable confusions and compromises life imposes on us, the inevitable follies we impose on ourselves... Brando has kept faith with incoherence. Whatever he has done and not done, no actor in his life and his work has more consistently kept us in touch with the erratic, that which is unpredicatable and dangerous in ourselves and in the world."---Richard Schickel in "Brando: A Life in Our Times" (1991)

"Brando's a giant on every level. When he acts, it's as if he's landed on another planet. He's got it all. That's why he's endured. When I first saw 'On The Waterfront' I couldn't move. I couldn't leave the theatre. I'd never seen the like of it. I couldn't believe it."---Al Pacino, Brando's co-star from "The Godfather Empire August 2004

"He's simply the best, and if he wants to call acting merely a craft, then he's the greatest craftsman who ever lived."---Dennis Hopper Empire August 2004

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