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Marlon Brando

Marlon Brando

  • Julius Caesar (1953) July 26 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Julius Caesar (1953) August 11 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Formula, The (1980) August 11 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Mutiny on the Bounty (1962) August 11 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Young Lions, The (1958) August 11 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
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Also Known As: Died: July 1, 2004
Born: April 3, 1924 Cause of Death: lung condition
Birth Place: Omaha, Nebraska, USA Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

1930:
Moved to Libertyville, Illinois
1942:
Worked as an elevator operator at Best & Company in New York for one week
1943:
Acted in little scenes to illustrate Dramatic Workshop teacher John Gassner's lectures
1944:
Debut stage performance in the dual roles of a school teacher and a dark angel in Erwin Piscator's production of Gerhardt Hauptman's "Hannele's Way to Heaven"
1944:
Appeared with a troupe of Dramatic Workshop students in summer stock in Sayville, New York
1944:
Broadway acting debut in "I Remember Mama"
1946:
Played a psychologically maimed war veteran in the short-lived Broadway drama, "Truckline Cafe"; first brought to the attention of Elia Kazan who produced the play
1946:
Performed in the Broadway production of "Candida" opposite Katharine Cornell
1946:
Played a heroic freedom fighter for the state of Israel in Ben Hecht's play, "A Flag is Born"
1947:
First leading role on Broadway in "A Streetcar Named Desire"; offered star-making turn as Stanley Kowalski opposite Jessica Tandy as Blanche DuBois
1949:
TV debut in the "I'm No Hero" segment of ABC's "Actors Studio"
:
First screen test for a film titled "Rebel Without a Cause" (not the same as the James Dean film)
1950:
Film acting debut, playing a paraplegic war veteran in "The Men"
1951:
Reprised stage role of Stanley in film version of "A Streetcar Named Desire"; received first of four consecutive Best Actor Academy Award nominations; was only one of the four nominated principals (Vivien Leigh, Kim Hunter and Karl Malden) not to win an Oscar
1952:
Earned second Best Actor Oscar nod in the title role of "Viva Zapata!"
:
After clashing with French director Claude Autant-Lara, walked off production of "The Red and the Black"
1953:
Offered impressive turn as Marc Antony in "Julius Caesar"; earned third Academy Award nomination
1953:
Made last stage appearance in a summer stock tour of "Arms and the Man"
1954:
Delivered generationally signature performance as the motorcycle-riding rebel in "The Wild One"
1954:
Won Best Actor Oscar for performance as washed-up fighter Terry Malloy in "On the Waterfront"
1955:
Portrayed gambler Sky Masterson in the movie version of the hit musical "Guys and Dolls"
1956:
Played an Okinawan in the feature version of the Broadway play "The Teahouse of the August Moon"
1957:
Portrayed a Korean war pilot who falls in love with a Japanese entertainer in "Sayonara"; earned fifth Best Actor Academy Award nomination
1959:
Formed Pennebaker Productions (named after his mother's maiden name) to produce films that would "explore the themes current in the world today"
1960:
Headlined the film version of Tennessee Williams' play "Orpheus Descending"; later renamed "The Fugitive Kind"
1961:
Feature directorial debut, "One-Eyed Jacks"; took over direction from Stanley Kubrick; also producing debut and had a starring role
1962:
Headlined the expensive remake of "Mutiny on the Bounty" playing Fletcher Christian
1963:
Sold Pennebaker Productions to Universal for a reported $1 million in exchange for a certain number of films to be made for Universal on a non-exclusive basis
1965:
Participated in the Selma, Alabama and the Washington DC civil rights marches
1966:
Was subject of the documentary, "Meet Marlon Brando"; filmed by the Maysles brothers
1967:
Directed by Charlie Chaplin in the misfire "The Countess From Hong Kong"
1968:
Acted in the then-controversial film "Candy"
1972:
Received second Academy Award playing the title role of "The Godfather"; co-written and directed by Francis Ford Coppola
1973:
Garnered seventh Best Actor Oscar nomination for Bernardo Bertolucci's sexually-themed drama "Last Tango in Paris"
1976:
Delivered an eccentric turn opposite Jack Nicholson in the oddball Western "The Missouri Breaks"
1978:
Portrayed Superman's father Jor-El in "Superman: The Movie"; earned a reported salary of $3.7 million and over 11 percent of the gross for a cameo role that was shot over four days
1979:
Re-teamed with Coppola to play the madman Kurtz in the Vietnam-themed drama "Apocalypse Now"
1979:
Won an Emmy Award for a rare TV appearance as George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of the American Nazi Party in "Roots: The Next Generations"
1980:
Last feature for almost a decade, the formulaic thriller "The Formula"
1989:
Resumed film acting and picked up eighth career Academy Award nomination as a British attorney in the anti-apartheid drama "A Dry White Season"; earned a salary in excess of $3 million which he reportedly donated to anti-apartheid charities
1990:
Spoofed his Oscar-winning turn as gangster Don Vito Corleone in the comedy "The Freshman"
1992:
Had cameo as Torquemada in the historical drama "Christopher Columbus: The Discovery"
1994:
Published memoirs, <i>Songs My Mother Taught Me</i>
1995:
Portrayed a psychiatrist treating a man who thinks he is the great lover in "Don Juan DeMarco"; co-starred Johnny Depp
1996:
Delivered perhaps the most eccentric turn of his career as the titular scientist in "The Island of Dr. Moreau"
1997:
Had small role in Johnny Depp's directorial debut, "The Brave"
1998:
Co-starred with Charlie Sheen in the comedy thriller "Free Money"; aired on Starz! before being released on video
2001:
Acted in "The Score" alongside Robert De Niro and Edward Norton
2001:
Agreed to appear (for a reported $2-3 million salary) in a cameo turn as a priest performing an exorcism in "Scary Movie 2"; forced to drop out due to ill health
2004:
Starred as himself in the documentary, "Brando and Brando"
2005:
Collaborated with film director Donald Cammell in 1979 on a China Seas pirate story, later published into the novel <i>Fan-Tan</i>

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