skip navigation
Robert Wise

Robert Wise

  • Hindenburg, The (1975) September 25 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Haunting, The (1963) October 25 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Haunting, The (1963) October 30 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Citizen Kane (1941) November 23 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Hunchback of Notre Dame, The (1939) November 29 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (8)



Also Known As: Died: September 14, 2005
Born: September 10, 1914 Cause of Death: heart failure
Birth Place: Winchester, Indiana, USA Profession: Director ...
RATE AND COMMENT

MILESTONES

:
Grew up in Connorsville, Indiana
1933:
After dropping out of college moved to Southern California, where his brother worked as an accountant at RKO Pictures
1933:
Hired by RKO as general editing gofer; promoted to apprentice sound editor after nine months; then music editor (i.e., "The Gay Divorcee" 1934 and "Top Hat" 1935)
1937:
Moved up to assistant picture editor, working under William Hamilton
1939:
First three films as co-editor (with Hamilton); "Fifth Avenue Girl", "The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle" and "The Hunchback of Notre Dame"
1940:
First two films as sole editor; "My Favorite Wife" and "Dance, Girl, Dance"
:
Edited both "Citizen Kane" (1941) and "The Magnificent Ambersons" (1942) for Orson Welles; earned Oscar nomination for his work on "Citizen Kane"
1944:
First film as co-director (due to illness and slowness of project's original director, Gunther von Fritsch), "The Curse of the Cat People"
1944:
First film as sole director, "Mademoiselle Fifi"
1947:
Helmed the supertough cult film noir "Born to Kill"; uncharacteristically mean-spirited for Wise
1949:
Made first boxing picture "The Set-Up", starring Robert Ryan
:
RKO (then in the hands of Howard Hughes) dropped Wise's contract; departed for three-year, nonexclusive contract with 20th Century-Fox
1951:
Directed the sci-fi classic "The Day the Earth Stood Still"
:
Teamed with two former RKO editors, director Mark Robson and producer Theron Warth, to form Aspen Productions; company released only two pictures, Wise's "The Captive City" (1952) and Robson's "Return to Paradise" (1953)
1954:
Brought into MGM fold to direct "Executive Suite"; following its preview, MGM signed Wise to three-year contract
1956:
Provided Paul Newman his big break in "Somebody Up There Likes Me", the boxing tale of Rocky Graziano; Wise's biggest hit of the 1950s
1958:
Received second Oscar nomination (this time for Best Director) for "I Want to Live!", starring Susan Hayward
1959:
First film as producer, "Odds Against Tomorrow"; also directed
1961:
Co-directed "West Side Story" with Jerome Robbins; also was one of the film's producers; won Best Director Oscar and Best Picture Oscar
1963:
Completed original commitment to MGM with a return to the horror genre, "The Haunting"
1965:
Earned third and fourth Oscars for directing and producing "The Sound of Music", starring Julie Andrews
1968:
Experienced box-office failure with "Star!", a biopic of Gertrude Lawrence starring Julie Andrews
1970:
Joined with Robson (again), James Bridges and former Paramount vice president Bernard Sonnenfield to form the Filmmaker's Group
1971:
Produced and directed film adaptation of Michael Cricton's first novel "The Andromeda Strain"
1979:
Boarded the Enterprise to direct "Star Trek--The Motion Picture"
1989:
Directed last feature to date, "Rooftops", an urban B musical about a teenaged white male, his forbidden Hispanic girlfriend, drug pushers and a form of "combat dancing" (martial arts without the sound of bones snapping)
1996:
Screen acting debut in John Landis' "The Stupids"
1998:
Received American Film Institute Life Achievement Award
2000:
Returned to directing at the helm of the Showtime remake of the TV-movie "A Storm in Summer"

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute