skip navigation
Simon Wincer

Simon Wincer

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

 
 

Crossfire Trail DVD Actors: Wilford Brimley, Barry Corbin, Mark Harmon, Virginia Madsen, Tom Selleck... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Monte Walsh DVD The Last Cowboy.Times change; Monte Walsh doesn't. For him, being a cowboy isn't... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Tom Selleck Western Collection... A collection of Tom Selleck's greatest westerns including: Monte Walsh, Last... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

Quigley Down Under DVD A clever twist on the classic Western, this film stars Tom Selleck as an... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Comanche Moon DVD This epic miniseries is a lavish Western adventure. Based on Larry McMurty's... more info $14.99was $14.99 Buy Now

Dark Forces DVD Harlequin is directed by Simon Wincer and tells a tale with echoes in... more info $19.95was $19.95 Buy Now



Also Known As: Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Australia Profession: director, producer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Logging in over 200 hours as a director on Australian TV during the 1970s on series including "Against the Wind" and "The Sullivans", Wincer made his feature directorial debut with the fairly derivative but competently crafted thriller "Snap Shot" (1979). He followed up with the genuinely offbeat if uneven tale of a Rasputin-like power, "Harlequin" (1980). His best known early film, though, was the acclaimed horse racing drama "Phar Lap" (1984), vividly documentarian in its style, if rather heavily sentimental in its narration. Wincer also did well producing the gripping, well-received adventure saga "The Man from Snowy River" (1982).A very skillful member of the second tier of accomplishment among the talents comprising the Australian New Wave of the 1970s and 80s, Wincer was, like many of his colleagues, beckoned by Hollywood. The results have, in general, been lighter, jokier fare; Wincer's craftsmanship has clearly thrived amid Hollywood's sumptuous production expertise, even if his work has not duplicated the handful of more provocative moments in his Australian work. His first US film was the forgettable comedy "D.A.R.Y.L." (1985), and he did no better with the silly concept driving "Harley...

Logging in over 200 hours as a director on Australian TV during the 1970s on series including "Against the Wind" and "The Sullivans", Wincer made his feature directorial debut with the fairly derivative but competently crafted thriller "Snap Shot" (1979). He followed up with the genuinely offbeat if uneven tale of a Rasputin-like power, "Harlequin" (1980). His best known early film, though, was the acclaimed horse racing drama "Phar Lap" (1984), vividly documentarian in its style, if rather heavily sentimental in its narration. Wincer also did well producing the gripping, well-received adventure saga "The Man from Snowy River" (1982).

A very skillful member of the second tier of accomplishment among the talents comprising the Australian New Wave of the 1970s and 80s, Wincer was, like many of his colleagues, beckoned by Hollywood. The results have, in general, been lighter, jokier fare; Wincer's craftsmanship has clearly thrived amid Hollywood's sumptuous production expertise, even if his work has not duplicated the handful of more provocative moments in his Australian work. His first US film was the forgettable comedy "D.A.R.Y.L." (1985), and he did no better with the silly concept driving "Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man" (1991). Hollywood has used him several times for Australian-based stories, but the material of "Quigley Down Under" (1990) and "Lightning Jack" (1994) was decidedly less substantial than his one return home for the intriguing historical war drama "The Lighthorsemen" (1989). Wincer's most popular US-made film marked another return for him, as the likable if derivative "boy and his whale" tale "Free Willy" (1993) recalled the tone and mass appeal of "Phar Lap". He later brought his craftsmanlike assurance to his most lavish film yet, "The Phantom" (1996), joining the list of US films based on comic strips.

Wincer has scored some of his biggest successes in the US on TV. His first TV-movie, "The Girl Who Spelled Freedom" (ABC, 1986), was another of the inspirational sagas he has been occasionally drawn to, but his rendering of a young Cambodian refugee who becomes a spelling champ had a quiet heartwarming intimacy. His miniseries, meanwhile, have given him reign to indulge his considerable talent for figure and camera movement amid sweeping landscapes. "The Last Frontier" (CBS, 1986), made with an almost entirely Australian cast, was a gritty tale of property feuds and harsh environs. Wincer did even better with "Lonesome Dove" (CBS, 1989), winning an Emmy for one of the most acclaimed miniseries of the 1980s, a maturely and often poetically handled adaptation of Larry McMurtry's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of a post-Civil War cattle drive.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

2.
3.
  Monte Walsh (2003) Director
5.
  Crossfire Trail (2001) Director
6.
  Echo of Thunder, The (1998) Director
7.
  Escape: Human Cargo (1998) Director
9.
  Flash (1997) Director
10.
  Phantom, The (1996) Director

CAST: (feature film)

VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Directed such Australian TV productions as "Ryan", "Against the Wind", "Tandarra", "Cash and Company", and "The Sullivans"
1978:
Made feature directorial debut with the Australian thriller, "Snap Shot"
:
Directed episodes of the syndicated Australian serial drama, "Prisoner: Cell Block H"
1982:
Made producing debut as executive producer of "The Man from Snowy River"
1985:
Directed first US feature film, "D.A.R.Y.L."
1986:
Directed first American TV-movie, "The Girl Who Spelled Freedom"
1986:
Directed first US TV miniseries, "The Last Frontier"
1989:
Helmed the acclaimed CBS miniseries, "Lonesome Dove"
1990:
Served as a consultant for the adventure series, "The Adventures of the Black Stallion" (syndicated on the Family Channel)
:
Directed five episodes of the ABC adventure series, "The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles"
1993:
Helmed "Free Willy"
1994:
Was director of the Paul Hogan starring vehicle "Lightening Jack"
1996:
Directed "The Phantom"
1999:
Was director of the A&E biographical miniseries "P.T. Barnum"
2001:
Helmed the TNT original "Louis L'Amour's Crossfire Trail"
2001:
Reteamed with Hogan to direct the sequel "'Crocodile' Dundee in L.A."
:
Signed to direct the prequel "Young Black Stallion" (in development as of early 2002)
2003:
Directed "The Young Black Stallion," the prequel to the 1979 classic "The Black Stallion"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute