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Clarence Wilson

Clarence Wilson

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Also Known As: Wilson Hummel, Wilson Hummell, Clarence H. Wilson, Clarence Hummel Wilson Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession:

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Charles Wilson was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. Early on in his acting career, Wilson landed roles in various films, including "Broadway Scandals" (1929), "Acquitted" (1929) and "The Kennel Murder Case" (1933) with William Powell. He also appeared in "No Marriage Ties" (1933) with Richard Dix, "Elmer the Great" (1933) and "Footlight Parade" (1933). He continued to work steadily in film throughout the thirties, appearing in the Claudette Colbert comedy "The Gilded Lily" (1935), "The Nitwits" (1935) with Bert Wheeler and the George Raft crime feature "The Glass Key" (1935). He also appeared in "The Perfect Clue" (1935). Film continued to be his passion as he played roles in "The Cowboy Quarterback" (1939), the crime picture "Smashing the Money Ring" (1939) with Ronald Reagan and "He Married His Wife" (1940). He also appeared in the Pat O'Brien biopic "Knute Rockne - All American" (1940) and the Gary Cooper drama "Meet John Doe" (1941). Wilson last acted in the comedy "Her Husband's Affairs" (1947) with Lucille Ball. Wilson passed away in January 1948 at the age of 54.

Charles Wilson was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. Early on in his acting career, Wilson landed roles in various films, including "Broadway Scandals" (1929), "Acquitted" (1929) and "The Kennel Murder Case" (1933) with William Powell. He also appeared in "No Marriage Ties" (1933) with Richard Dix, "Elmer the Great" (1933) and "Footlight Parade" (1933). He continued to work steadily in film throughout the thirties, appearing in the Claudette Colbert comedy "The Gilded Lily" (1935), "The Nitwits" (1935) with Bert Wheeler and the George Raft crime feature "The Glass Key" (1935). He also appeared in "The Perfect Clue" (1935). Film continued to be his passion as he played roles in "The Cowboy Quarterback" (1939), the crime picture "Smashing the Money Ring" (1939) with Ronald Reagan and "He Married His Wife" (1940). He also appeared in the Pat O'Brien biopic "Knute Rockne - All American" (1940) and the Gary Cooper drama "Meet John Doe" (1941). Wilson last acted in the comedy "Her Husband's Affairs" (1947) with Lucille Ball. Wilson passed away in January 1948 at the age of 54.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Go Man Go (1954)
3.
 You're the One (1941) Mr. Miggles
4.
 Little Men (1941) Reynolds
5.
 Road Show (1941) Sheriff
6.
 Angels with Broken Wings (1941) Sybil's lawyer
7.
 Haunted House (1940)
8.
 Friendly Neighbors (1940) Silas Barton
9.
 Street of Memories (1940) Professor
10.
 Melody Ranch (1940) Judge "Skinny" Henderson
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Contributions

MichaelFitz ( 2009-03-04 )

Source: not available

Date of Birth
17 November 1876, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

Date of Death
5 October 1941, Los Angeles, California, USA

Birth Name Clarence Hummel Wilson

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