skip navigation
Mary Wickes

Mary Wickes

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (1)

Recent DVDs

 
 

Sister Act... Relive all the fun, laughter, and irresistible music of SISTER ACT -- the... more info $6.25was $6.25 Buy Now

The Story Of... Comedy great Bob Hope narrates the movie biography of another great American... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

The... Richard Kiley, Shelly Fabares and Mary Wickes star, in this Wonderworks series... more info $6.95was $6.95 Buy Now

Lucy Calls The... One of the screen's greatest comediennes, Lucille Ball ended the successful... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Where Angels... California or Bust: The Angels Ride Again!Rosalind Russell, Stella Stevens and... more info $14.99was $14.99 Buy Now

It Happened To... The Romantic Comedy Classic That Goes Straight To The Heart!In this classic... more info $14.99was $14.99 Buy Now

Also Known As: Mary Isabelle Wickenhauser Died: October 22, 1995
Born: June 13, 1910 Cause of Death: complications following surgery
Birth Place: St Louis, Missouri, USA Profession: Cast ... actor acting teacher
RATE AND COMMENT

BIOGRAPHY

A tall, lanky character actress, Wickes was a durable and invaluable comedy player of innumerable housekeepers, nurses and nuns. With her gawky frame, deliciously angular features and famous recessed chin, she wisecracked, busybodied and nosed her way through almost 20 Broadway plays, hundreds of stock productions, ten TV series, countless small-screen guest spots and nearly 50 feature films. Wickes began on stage in the early 1930s and acted in five plays either written or directed by George S. Kaufman. Her breakthrough came when she hilariously played Miss Preen, the endlessly harassed nurse to the vituperative Sheridan Whiteside (Monty Woolley) in Kaufman and Hart's "The Man Who Came to Dinner" (1939-40). Wickes later recreated her most famous role as her film debut in 1941, in a radio production starring Fred Allen and in a 1972 TV version with Orson Welles.

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute