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The Last Temptation of Christ: The... Removed from the controversy that attended its premiere, this 15-year labor of... more info $39.95was $39.95 Buy Now

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Also Known As: David Robert Jones, Ziggy Stardust Died:
Born: January 8, 1947 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: South London, England, GB Profession: singer, songwriter, actor, music producer, producer, painter, commercial artist in advertising agency

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Hailed by many as the founding father of "glam rock," David Bowie defied any conventions of what a star is and blurred the lines between music and performance art. Embracing the avant-garde, Bowie created futuristic, androgynous characters to represent the music he released in the form of seminal rock albums such as Space Oddity (1969), The Man Who Sold the World (1970), and The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars (1972). A musical chameleon, Bowie reinvented his persona with every album and live performance, from the decadent Ziggy Stardust, to the enigmatic Thin White Duke, and helped pioneer several genres of music, including New Wave, industrial, and electronic. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee's constant reinvention and love of theatrics also influenced artists like Madonna and Lady Gaga, while his enormous talent allowed him to enjoy equal success as an actor, working with filmmakers such as Martin Scorsese and David Lynch. Renowned for exploring the fringes of pop music, Bowie carved a successful career out of change, and retained his reputation as an experimental artist as well as a true music icon.He was born David Jones on Jan. 8, 1947 in London, England, the...

Hailed by many as the founding father of "glam rock," David Bowie defied any conventions of what a star is and blurred the lines between music and performance art. Embracing the avant-garde, Bowie created futuristic, androgynous characters to represent the music he released in the form of seminal rock albums such as Space Oddity (1969), The Man Who Sold the World (1970), and The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars (1972). A musical chameleon, Bowie reinvented his persona with every album and live performance, from the decadent Ziggy Stardust, to the enigmatic Thin White Duke, and helped pioneer several genres of music, including New Wave, industrial, and electronic. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee's constant reinvention and love of theatrics also influenced artists like Madonna and Lady Gaga, while his enormous talent allowed him to enjoy equal success as an actor, working with filmmakers such as Martin Scorsese and David Lynch. Renowned for exploring the fringes of pop music, Bowie carved a successful career out of change, and retained his reputation as an experimental artist as well as a true music icon.

He was born David Jones on Jan. 8, 1947 in London, England, the son of a charity promotions officer and a cinema usherette. He took up playing the saxophone at 13 and sang in the Burnt Ash Junior School choir. The young Bowie was heavily influenced by the records his father played at home, which were mostly American artists like Fats Domino, Elvis Presley and Little Richard. While attending Bromley Technical High School, a classmate permanently paralyzed Bowie's left pupil after punching him in a fight over a girl. The damage left the future star with faulty depth perception and a permanently dilated pupil. Ironically, Bowie remained good friends with the perpetrator, George Underwood, who went on to create the artwork for the singer's early albums. Bowie formed his first band at 15 called the Konrads. The group often performed at local gatherings and weddings until Bowie left the band to join another group, the King Bees. With the lack of any commercial success, an unhappy Bowie left the band less than a month later. He formed or joined various groups, from the Manish Boys to Davey Jones and the Lower Third, before pursuing a solo recording career. To avoid confusion with the Monkees' Davy Jones, he adopted the stage name David Bowie (inspired by the 19th Century fixed-blade knife) and signed with Deram Records.

Bowie released his self-titled debut album in 1967, a collection of pop and folk rock songs that bore little resemblance to the type of music he released later in his career. Bowie's singer-songwriter approach failed to grab listeners' attention, not to mention the record was released in the U.K. the same day as The Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band." That same year, Bowie spent a few weeks at a Scottish monastery, and then apprenticed in dancer Lindsay Kemp's avant-garde theater and mime group. He formed his own troupe called Feathers in 1968 before establishing the experimental Beckenham Arts Lab a year later. To fund his artistic endeavor, Bowie signed with Philips/Mercury and released the psychedelic folk track, "Space Oddity." The song originally appeared in Bowie's promotional film "Love You till Tuesday" (1969), but was released as a single to coincide with the Apollo 11 moon landing. "Space Oddity" told the story of a fictional astronaut named Major Tom who departs from Earth to journey beyond the stars. Many interpreted Major Tom as a metaphor for Bowie's artistic evolution, while others thought it was a hallucinogenic trip in musical form. Major Tom reappeared in other Bowie songs throughout his career, namely "Ashes to Ashes" (1980) and "Hallo Spaceboy" (1995). The album Space Oddity was a hit in the U.K., but failed to make waves in the U.S. - where it was released as Man of Words, Man of Music. The album finally reached No. 15 stateside when it was re-released in 1973.

Bowie's musical style took on a heavier rock sound with Space Oddity and his third album, The Man Who Sold the World. The album was the first time Bowie recorded with the backing band, which was later renamed the "Spiders from Mars." The songs were also a far departure from Bowie's folk-tinged debut and into a heavier metal sound, laced with lyrics about insanity (the song "All the Madmen" was reportedly inspired by the singer's institutionalized brother Terry), violence, and Vietnam War commentary. The album's U.K. cover art featured Bowie in a reclining position and wearing a dress, an early indication of his fascination with androgyny. Critics also regarded the release of The Man Who Sold the World as the birth of "glam rock," a genre that also included Bowie's friend, former band member, and artistic rival Marc Bolan - who fronted the band T. Rex. The early 1970s saw a rise in popularity for glam rock stars like Bowie and Bolan, typified by their outrageous stage costumes, gender-bending personalities, and guitar-driven music. Around the same time, two American proto-punk artists - Iggy Pop and the Velvet Underground's Lou Reed - inspired Bowie to come up with the concept of "the ultimate pop idol," which became the blueprint for a character he created named Ziggy Stardust.

In 1972, Bowie released The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, an artfully crafted concept album that TIME magazine chose as one of the 100 Best Albums of All Time. The record's futuristic theme told the story of a doomed Messiah-like rock star named Ziggy Stardust, a human-like alien who dreams of a savior named Starman, who was also Earth's last hope. Onstage, Bowie embodied the Ziggy Stardust character. From his striking fiery red hair, to his futuristic jumpsuits, to his sparkly platform boots, he emerged as a bona fide rock star. The album's success paved the way Bowie's subsequent releases, including Aladdin Sane (1973), Pin Ups (1973), and Diamond Dogs (1974), all dealing with themes of post-apocalyptic worlds, gender-bending anti-heroes, and mankind's self-destruction. Midway through an American tour, Bowie visited Philadelphia's Sigma Sound Studios and began working on songs for his next album. The sessions resulted in the album Young Americans (1975), Bowie's departure from his glam rock phase and into his soulful Thin White Duke era. Dressed in baggy Oxford trousers, hair trimmed, and sans makeup, Bowie worked with a new band that included future R&B hitmaker Luther Vandross singing back-up vocals and co-writing tracks with him. The album also included the single "Fame," co-written with Carlos Alomar and John Lennon, which became Bowie's first No. 1 single in the U.S.

Bowie's success in America led him to move to Los Angeles to explore new artistic ventures. He made his acting debut in 1976, starring in Nicolas Roeg's "The Man Who Fell to Earth" as an extraterrestrial being who crash lands on Earth, hoping to find a way to transport water to his drought-ridden planet of Anthea. Even though there was no official film soundtrack because of contractual disputes with the studio, Bowie's 10th album Station to Station (1976) and his Thin White Duke persona bared a striking resemblance visually and musically to his character in "The Man Who Fell to Earth." Bowie moved to Europe that same year and battled his ongoing drug addiction. His taste in music also shifted once again, leaving behind the soul and funk of his Philadelphia years, moving into the ambient and electronic sounds of Berlin, Germany. Bowie recorded some of his most prolific work in the late 1970's with producer Brian Eno, collectively called the Berlin Trilogy (1977-79). Even though the three albums - Low, Heroes, and Lodgers - were not commercially successful, many regarded them as influencing various music genres, including New Wave, electronic and industrial.

The 1980s brought Bowie to the forefront of mainstream music with the hit Queen/Freddie Mercury collaboration "Under Pressure" and the 1983 smash album, Let's Dance, which yielded the Top 20 singles "Let's Dance," "China Girl," and "Modern Love." Co-produced by Nile Rodgers and Stevie Ray Vaughn, the album turned Bowie into a pop star, fueled by his avant-garde and stylish music videos receiving heavy rotation on MTV. Bowie further padded his acting résumé by playing a 150-year-old vampire in "The Hunger" (1983) opposite Catherine Deneuve and Susan Sarandon, delivering a scene-stealing performance as an evil goblin king in the fantasy adventure "Labyrinth" (1986), and portraying Pontius Pilate in Martin Scorsese's "The Last Temptation of Christ" (1988). Bowie was also a featured performer at the history-making benefit concert Live Aid, where his duet with Mick Jagger, a cover of Martha and the Vandellas' 1964 hit "Dancing in the Street," was released as a music video and single. Bowie ended the decade by forming Tin Machine, his first group since recording as a solo artist in the early '70s. Intended as a "back-to-basics" project for the rocker, Tin Machine's debut album earned positive reviews for its stripped down rock format and insightful lyrics.

Bowie's sexual orientation was a topic of debate for most of his career, but Bowie declared himself bisexual during a 1972 interview with Melody Maker magazine. He revealed 11 years later to Rolling Stone that publicly revealing his bisexuality was the biggest mistake he ever made. Still, Bowie's personal life made headlines in the early 1990s when he married supermodel and actress, Iman. A mutual friend introduced the British rocker to the Somali-born beauty, whom he married in 1992. That same year, Bowie played a mysterious FBI agent in David Lynch's noir drama "Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me." The decade saw more transformations in Bowie's musical style - fusing soul, jazz and hip-hop in the album Black Tie White Noise (1993), moving on to industrial sounds with Outside (1995), and championing electronic music with Earthling (1997). Bowie was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996 and received a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2006. To celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, Bowie released the Space Oddity EP (2009) a multi-track recording of his landmark song that allowed fans to make their own versions and remixes.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
3.
 Bandslam (2009)
4.
 August (2008)
5.
 Glastonbury (2006)
7.
 Prestige, The (2006)
8.
 Il Mio West (2005) Jack Sikora
9.
 Mayor of the Sunset Strip (2003) Himself
10.
 Zoolander (2001) (Cameo Appearance)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
To avoid confusion with child actor and The Monkees member Davy Jones, changed name from David Jones to David Bowie; adopted Bowie after the Bowie knife
1967:
Apprenticed in Lindsay Kemp's mime troupe, exchanging musical scores for pantomime lessons
:
Acted in a 15-minute short ("The Image"), a commercial for ice cream and a BBC-TV play, "The Pistol Shot"
1968:
With co-star from "The Pistol Shot", started Feathers, a mime troupe
1969:
First hit record, "Space Oddity"; an international smash at the time of the US moon landing, it peaked at Number 5 in the UK
1969:
Started Beckenham Arts Lab to experiment with theater and music
1969:
Feature debut in a bit part in "The Virgin Soldiers"
:
Mimed at some T. Rex concerts
1972:
Told MELODY MAKER he was gay, enjoying the idea of a cult growing around his androgynous image
1973:
Feature film debut as performer and songwriter, the concert documentary, "Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars" (not released in the USA until 1984)
1975:
Collaborated with John Lennon on "Fame", song from the "Young Americans" album which became his first Number 1 single in the USA
1976:
Starred in "The Man Who Fell to Earth" (directed by Nicolas Roeg), his first significant feature work
1977:
Toured Europe and America as Iggy Pop's pianist; had produced Pop's albums "Raw Power","The Idiot" and "Lust for Life"
1977:
US TV debut (taped in London), "Bing Crosby's Merrie Olde Christmas" special; performed duet of "Little Drummer Boy" with Crosby
1979:
Portrayed Prussian war veteran in "Just a Gigolo", notable as Marlene Dietrich's last film
1981:
Broadway acting debut as John Merrick in "The Elephant Man"
1982:
Appeared in BBC-TV production of Bertolt Brecht's "Baal"
1982:
Was splendid as a WWII British major in Nagisa Oshima's first English-language film, "Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence"
1983:
Portrayed 150-year-old vampire in "The Hunger"; Bowie's aging scene is considered one of the film's highlights
1985:
Appeared in Martin Scorsese's "Into the Night"
1986:
Played Jareth, King of the Goblins, in Jim Henson's "Labyrinth"
1988:
Acted the part of Pontius Pilate in Scorsese's "The Last Temptation of Christ"
1988:
First network TV special, "David Bowie: Glass Spider Tour" (ABC)
1994:
Served as executive producer on "Magic Hunter" and "Mesmer"
1996:
Portrayed Andy Warhol in "Basquiat"
1997:
Received star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (February 12)
1997:
Co-founded the art book publishing house 21
2002:
Released album "Heathen" to positive reviews;
:
Voice featured in "Arthur and the Minimoys," a live-action/computer-animated fantasy feature based on a popular French children's book by filmmaker Luc Besson, who is directing the project
:
Set to score the Broadway musical that will be based on the life of Bruce Lee
2006:
Cast as an inventor and electrical wizard in the Christopher Nolan-directed "The Prestige"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Bromley Technical High School: -

Notes

Pulled a no-show at his induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996.

Received an honorary doctorate of music from Berklee School of Music in Boston, Massachusetts in May 1999.

In July 1998, formally announced plans to launch a high-speed Internet service provider at www.davidbowie.com.

In December 2001, due to his frustration with the "corporate structure" of his longtime record label Virgin Records, announced formation of own independent music company.

"The three or four years that followed 'Let's Dance' were for me particularly tough about reevaluating what I wanted. I thought, 'Who are these people? They kind of look like a Phil Collins audience.' Suddenly, I had all these people for whom the songs on the radio--'China Girl', 'Modern Girl' and 'Let's Dance'--had become my oeurve. That was all they knew of me, and it was MOR [middle of the road] enough that it encouraged this enormous audience. And I started thinking, What kind of music would they like? I was bastardizing who and what I am and didn't know how to break out of it." --David Bowie in GQ, January 1997.

"Ever since I discovered the Dadaists I related to them. They became my family. I could see the sense of their nonsense. These were fellow uncles and aunts. The idea that they completely deconstructed the world around them and destroyed every orthodoxy and said with glee that art is shit and art is dead and art no longer exists--was a triumphal rebelliousness of an extreme order . . . For me, it was the joy of recreating the gleeful mischief of the Dada era and applying it to rock. That kind of juxtaposition, that synthesis, always excites me because it takes two known ingredients and produces a third totally new thing. You don't stick with communism and you don't stick with capitalism--you take the best of both and create a new way, a new system that has no name. That's really what I think my work does. I create the little monsters of our time." --Bowie in Interview, February 1997.

"About 15 or 16 years ago, I really got pretty tired of fending off questions about what I used to do with my [penis] in the early 70s. My suggestion for people with prurient interests is to go through the 30 or 40 bios on me and pick out the rumor of their choice." --Bowie quoted in Us, November 1995.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Angela Bowie. Actor. Married on March 20, 1970; divorced in 1980; mother of Joey Bowie.
companion:
Melissa Hurley. Dancer. Born c. 1967.
wife:
Iman. Model, actor. Married on June 6 1992; proposed in November 1991; Somalian; formerly married to NBA star Spencer Haywood with whom she has a daughter, Zulekha born c. 1988; mother of Bowie's daughter Alexandria.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Hayward Stenton Jones.
mother:
Margaret Mary Burns. Died in 2001.
brother:
Terry Jones. Institutionalized; inspired Bowie's song "All the Madmen"; Bowie claims generations of insanity in his family.
son:
Zowie Duncan Heywood Bowie. Born c. 1971; was studying philosophy as of fall 1995.
step-daughter:
Zulekha Haywood. Born c. 1988.
daughter:
Alexandria Zahra Jones. Born on August 15, 2000; mother, Iman.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Backstage Passes: Life on the Wild Side With David Bowie" G.P. Putnam's Sons

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