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Harry Warren

Harry Warren

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Also Known As: Salvatore Anthony Guaranga, H Warren Died: September 22, 1981
Born: December 24, 1893 Cause of Death: kidney failure
Birth Place: Brooklyn, New York, USA Profession: composer, songwriter, stagehand, actor, propman, drummer, assistant director

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Harry Warren's film work led to high accolades, not least of which include an Oscar from the Academy. Warren worked on a variety of projects during his early entertainment career, including "Footlight Parade" (1933), "Gold Diggers of 1933" (1933) starring Warren William, "Moulin Rouge" with Constance Bennett (1934) and "Wonder Bar" (1934) starring Al Jolson. Warren won a Music (Song) Academy Award for "Gold Diggers of 1935" in 1935 as well as a Music (Song) Academy Award for "Hello, Frisco, Hello" in 1943. Warren was nominated for a Music (Song) Academy Award for "Mr. Dodd Takes the Air," as well as for a Music (Song) Academy Award for "Going Places" and a Music (Song) Academy Award for "Down Argentine Way." In the eighties, Warren devoted his time to various credits, such as "Not For Publication" (1984), "The Purple Rose of Cairo" with Mia Farrow (1985), "Before Stonewall" (1986) starring Allen Ginsberg and "Radio Days" with Mia Farrow (1987). Warren had a number of different projects under his belt in the nineties, including "Kissing A Fool" (1998), "Living Out Loud" with Holly Hunter (1998), "Meet Joe Black" (1998) starring Brad Pitt and "Pleasantville" (1998). Warren last provided music for "The...

Harry Warren's film work led to high accolades, not least of which include an Oscar from the Academy. Warren worked on a variety of projects during his early entertainment career, including "Footlight Parade" (1933), "Gold Diggers of 1933" (1933) starring Warren William, "Moulin Rouge" with Constance Bennett (1934) and "Wonder Bar" (1934) starring Al Jolson. Warren won a Music (Song) Academy Award for "Gold Diggers of 1935" in 1935 as well as a Music (Song) Academy Award for "Hello, Frisco, Hello" in 1943. Warren was nominated for a Music (Song) Academy Award for "Mr. Dodd Takes the Air," as well as for a Music (Song) Academy Award for "Going Places" and a Music (Song) Academy Award for "Down Argentine Way." In the eighties, Warren devoted his time to various credits, such as "Not For Publication" (1984), "The Purple Rose of Cairo" with Mia Farrow (1985), "Before Stonewall" (1986) starring Allen Ginsberg and "Radio Days" with Mia Farrow (1987). Warren had a number of different projects under his belt in the nineties, including "Kissing A Fool" (1998), "Living Out Loud" with Holly Hunter (1998), "Meet Joe Black" (1998) starring Brad Pitt and "Pleasantville" (1998). Warren last provided music for "The Misadventures of Margaret." Warren was married to Josephine Warren and had two children. Harry Warren passed away in September 1981 at the age of 88.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 The Man from Down Under (1943) Military policeman
2.
 Salute to the Marines (1943) Marine
3.
 Reap the Wild Wind (1942) Boston, member of 'Jubilee' crew
4.
 Go into Your Dance (1935) Himself
5.
 A Very Honorable Guy (1934) Harry
6.
 42nd Street (1933) Song writer
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Milestones close milestones

:
Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York
:
Dropped out of high school to join a traveling circus as a drummer
:
Hired by Vitagraph Studios in NYC
1917:
Enlisted in US Navy; began writing songs
:
After military service, continued to pursue career as a songwriter
1920:
Hired to work as a song plugger at Stark & Cowan; quit after a short stint
1922:
Had his first hit song, "Rose of the Rio Grande," with lyrics by Edgar Leslie
1923:
Both "Home in Pasadena" and "So This Is Venice" introduced by Paul Whiteman
1929:
Served as director of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP)
1930:
Penned the score for the film "Spring Is Here"
1930:
Worked on the score for the stage musical "Sweet and Low," with lyrics by Ira Gershwin
1931:
Hired by Billy Rose to write songs for the stage show "Crazy Quilt", including the now classic "I Found a Million Dollar Baby (in the Five and Ten Cent Store)"
1931:
Collaborated with lyricist Mort Dixon on the songs for the Broadway show "Laugh Parade"
1933:
Wrote music for "Roman Scandals" featuring Eddie Cantor
1933:
With Al Dubin, wrote the songs for the screen musical "42nd Street"; also appeared on screen with Dubin
1933:
Appeared in the short film "Harry Warren, America's Foremost Composer"
1933:
Composed songs for "Footlight Parade" and "The Gold Diggers of 1933"
1935:
Received the Academy Award for Best Song for "Lullaby of Broadway," written for "Gold Diggers of 1935"
1937:
Picked up his second Academy Award nomination for "Remember Me"
1938:
Earned his third Oscar nomination for "Jeepers Creepers," written with Johnny Mercer for the film "Going Places"
1940:
Put under contract at 20th Century-Fox; worked frequently with lyricist Mack Gordon
1940:
Fourth Best Song Oscar nomination, the title number from "Down Argentine Way", with lyrics by Gordon
1941:
Had a hit song with "Chattanooga Choo Choo" (lyrics by Mack Gordon), recorded by Glenn Miller, which was used in the film "Sun Valley Serenade" and for which he earned his fifth Best Song Oscar nomination
1942:
Once again had a hit introduced by Glenn Miller, "I've Got a Gal in Kalamazoo"; featured in the movie "Orchestra Wives"; netted sixth career Best Song Oscar nomination
1943:
Won his second Academy Award for "You'll Never Know," written with Mack Gordon for the film "Hello, Frisco, Hello"
1943:
Moved from 20th Century-Fox to MGM
1946:
Earned his third Oscar for "On the Acheson, Topeka and the Sante Fe," lyrics by Johnny Mercer, written for the film musical "The Harvey Girls"
1948:
Wrote the music for "Summer Holiday"
1949:
Loaned out to Warner Bros. to write the songs for the Doris Day vehicle "My Dream Is Yours"
1949:
Penned songs for the Astaire-Rogers reteaming in "The Barkleys of Broadway"
1952:
Released from his contract by MGM
1952:
Garnered his ninth Oscar nomination for Best Song for "Zing a Little Zong" (written with Leo Robin) for the film "Just for You," one of 11 songs written for the film
1953:
Penned "That's Amore" for the film "The Caddy" (lyrics by Jack Brooks), and earned his 10th Oscar nomination for Best Song
1955:
Composed the theme for the TV series "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp"
1956:
Wrote the score for the Broadway musical "Shangri-La," based on the book and film "Lost Horizon"
1957:
Wrote the title tune for "An Affair to Remember" (with lyrics by director Leo McCarey and Harold Adamson), and earned his 11th career Academy Award nomination
1957:
Composed the theme to the TV series "The Californians"
1958:
Wrote the title song for the film "Separate Tables"
1960:
Composed the songs for the Jerry Lewis vehicle "Cinderfella"
1961:
Penned the song "Bang Tail" for "The Ladies' Man," starring Lewis
1980:
Hired to write the songs for an unproduced film called "Manhattan Melody"
1980:
Stage adaptation of "42nd Street" opened on Broadway and won that year's Tony Award as Best Musical; producer David Merrick did not mention the songwriters in any advertising for the show
2001:
Revival of "42nd Street" opened on Broadway
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Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Josephine Warren. Married in December 1918.

Family close complete family listing

son:
Harry Warren Jr. Born in 1919; died in 1938 of pneumonia.
daughter:
Joan Warren. Born c. 1924.

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