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Diane Warren

Diane Warren

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Also Known As: Diane Eve Warren Died:
Born: September 7, 1956 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Van Nuys, California, USA Profession: songwriter, singer, messenger

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

One of the few female songwriters who does not also perform, Diane Warren has been crafting bouncy, danceable hits as well as soaring popular tunes. Her efforts have been recorded by major pop stars ranging from Laura Branigan ("Solitaire" 1983) to Cher ("If I Could Turn Back Time" 1989) to Michael Bolton ("Time, Love and Tenderness" 1991). Simultaneously, this California-born songwriter has been composing original tunes for motion picture soundtracks, earning three Oscar nominations for 1987's "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now" (from "Mannequin"; co-written with Albert Hammond) 1996's "Because You Loved Me" (from "Up Close and Personal") and 1997's "How Do I Live" (from "Con Air). Among the other songs she has contributed to films are "If You Asked Me To" ("Licence to Kill" 1989), "Every Road Leads Back to You" ("For the Boys" 1991), "You Were Loved" ("The Preacher's Wife" 1996) and both "Hit 'Em High" and "For You I Will" (from "Space Jam" 1996).

One of the few female songwriters who does not also perform, Diane Warren has been crafting bouncy, danceable hits as well as soaring popular tunes. Her efforts have been recorded by major pop stars ranging from Laura Branigan ("Solitaire" 1983) to Cher ("If I Could Turn Back Time" 1989) to Michael Bolton ("Time, Love and Tenderness" 1991). Simultaneously, this California-born songwriter has been composing original tunes for motion picture soundtracks, earning three Oscar nominations for 1987's "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now" (from "Mannequin"; co-written with Albert Hammond) 1996's "Because You Loved Me" (from "Up Close and Personal") and 1997's "How Do I Live" (from "Con Air). Among the other songs she has contributed to films are "If You Asked Me To" ("Licence to Kill" 1989), "Every Road Leads Back to You" ("For the Boys" 1991), "You Were Loved" ("The Preacher's Wife" 1996) and both "Hit 'Em High" and "For You I Will" (from "Space Jam" 1996).

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Intimate Portrait: Toni Braxton (2002) Interviewee
2.
 Road to Fame (2001)
3.
 Gift of Song, A (1997)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1970:
At age 14, began performing career as a singer at a restaurant in Venice, California
1982:
Wrote first hit single, "Solitaire", recorded by Laura Branigan
1984:
Contributed first song to a motion picture, "Hot Night" included on the soundtrack to "Ghostbusters II"
1985:
Received a Golden Globe Award nomination for the song "Rhythm of the Night" from the feature "The Last Dragon"
1986:
Founded Realsongs, a publishing company to handle the rights to her songs
1987:
Was nominated for Best Original Song Oscar for "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now" from "Mannequin"
1989:
Wrote the theme song to the James Bond film "Licence to Kill"
1996:
Got second Oscar nomination for Best Song for "Because You Loved Me", the love theme from "Up Close and Personal"
1996:
Toni Braxton's recording of her pop song "Unbreak My Heart" was a Number One Hit
1997:
Earned third Academy Award nomination for the country-flavored song "How Do I Live" used in the film "Con Air"; song was recorded by both Lee Ann Rimes and Trisha Yearwood
1999:
Penned the theme to "Music of My Heart"; picked up a Best Original Song Academy Award nomination
2000:
Had four songs featured on the soundtrack of "Coyote Ugly"
2000:
Wrote the song "I Don't Know How I Got By" for the film "The Family Man"
2001:
Received star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (January 31)
2001:
Contributed the love theme ("There You'll Be") to "Pearl Harbor"; netted sixth Oscar nomination
2001:
With James Newton Howard, co-wrote songs for Disney's animated "Atlantis: The Lost Empire"; when film was released, however, only one of the songs "Where the Dream Takes You", was included
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Notes

There is an official Web site located at www.realsongs.com

Warren received ASCAP's pop songwriter of the year award for an unprecendented five straight years (1995-1999)

David Geffen has called Warren "one of the best songwriters in the world".

Inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in June 2001.

"I still don't think I've made it. That's the weird thing. I know I have. Believe me, I get the cheques to prove it. But in my mind, I still feel like this struggling songwriter, I still come in and work harder than I ever have." --Diane Warren quoted in The Daily Telegraph, July 25, 2000.

"She hits a common chord, no pun intended. She touches everyone. She nails simple emotions in a very direct way that's relatable, which is what songwriting's all about: communication." --lyricist Carole Bayer Sager on Warren, quoted in The Hollywood Reporter, December 5, 1996.

"I expect to sit down, whenever I write a song, to write a great song. I put pressure on myself. I've been doing this since I was 14 years old, Nobody could put more pressure on myself than I do." --Diane Warren in The Hollywood Reporter December 5, 1996.

Family close complete family listing

father:
David Warren. Insurance salesman. Changed family surname to avoid anti-Semitism.

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