skip navigation
Jerry Wald

Jerry Wald

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

Roy Rogers Double Feature 1 ... This rough and tumble double-feature stars Roy Rogers, the "King of the... more info $8.95was $14.93 Buy Now

Also Known As: Jerome Irving Wald Died: July 13, 1962
Born: September 16, 1911 Cause of Death: heart attack
Birth Place: Brooklyn, New York, USA Profession: producer, screenwriter, journalist

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A Tinseltown presence who began in radio and worked in Hollywood's heyday with Busby Berkeley on "Hollywood Hotel" and with Raoul Walsh on "The Roaring Twenties," Jerry Wald wrote or produced over 60 features and shorts over his relatively brief career. After writing a radio column while at New York University, be soon began to pen and produce several short features for Warner Brothers. His star-studded series, called "Rambling 'Round Radio Row," launched his Hollywood career, and soon he was scripting features, including 1935's redemption romance "Living on Velvet" for director Frank Borzage. He soon began work on other musicals, partnering with such writers as Julius J. Epstein and Richard Macaulay. Throughout the 1930s he accumulated over 20 film writing credits, including the original story for Berkeley's musical comedy "Hollywood Hotel," the James Cagney-Humphrey Bogart crime thriller "The Roaring Twenties," and Bogart's 1940 noir thriller "They Drive by Night." Throughout the â¿¿30s, Wald was desperate to return to the producing role he'd had a taste of on "Radio Row," and by 1941 he began to achieve his dream, collaborating behind the scenes with some of Hollywood's top talent. At a breakneck...

A Tinseltown presence who began in radio and worked in Hollywood's heyday with Busby Berkeley on "Hollywood Hotel" and with Raoul Walsh on "The Roaring Twenties," Jerry Wald wrote or produced over 60 features and shorts over his relatively brief career. After writing a radio column while at New York University, be soon began to pen and produce several short features for Warner Brothers. His star-studded series, called "Rambling 'Round Radio Row," launched his Hollywood career, and soon he was scripting features, including 1935's redemption romance "Living on Velvet" for director Frank Borzage. He soon began work on other musicals, partnering with such writers as Julius J. Epstein and Richard Macaulay. Throughout the 1930s he accumulated over 20 film writing credits, including the original story for Berkeley's musical comedy "Hollywood Hotel," the James Cagney-Humphrey Bogart crime thriller "The Roaring Twenties," and Bogart's 1940 noir thriller "They Drive by Night." Throughout the â¿¿30s, Wald was desperate to return to the producing role he'd had a taste of on "Radio Row," and by 1941 he began to achieve his dream, collaborating behind the scenes with some of Hollywood's top talent. At a breakneck pace, Wald produced some 50-plus pictures, from melodramas like the Joan Crawford vehicle "Mildred Pierce" to John Huston's Bogart-and-Bacall noir classic "Key Largo"; meanwhile, he produced two of the televised Academy Award ceremonies, in 1958 and 1959. Wald's flourishing Hollywood career was cut short when he died of a heart attack at the age of 50.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

2.
 The Big Show (1957)
3.
 Kill the Umpire (1950) Radio voice
4.
5.
6.
7.
 Vacation Days (1947) Jerry Wald
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Education

New York University: New York , New York -

Contributions

albatros1 ( 2007-10-12 )

Source: Wikipedia The Intrnet Encyclopedia

Jerry Wald, born Jerome Irving Wald (16 September 1911 - 13 July 1962), was a producer and screenwriter for motion pictures and radio shows. Born in Brooklyn, New York, his brother and sons have all been active in the business. Wald produced and wrote many films between the 1940s and 1960s including On Your Toes (in collaboration with the playwright Lawrence Riley), Sons and Lovers, The Sound and the Fury, In Love and War, Peyton Place, An Affair to Remember, Two Tickets to Broadway, The Glass Menagerie, The Blue Veil, From Here to Eternity, Always Leave them Laughing, Key Largo, Mildred Pierce, Johnny Belinda, Destination Tokyo, Across the Pacific, The Man Who Came to Dinner, Navy Blues, The Road to Frisco, The Roaring Twenties, and Stars Over Broadway. He also produced the Academy Awards ceremony twice. He was nominated for academy awards for Mildred Pierce, Johnny Belinda, Peyton Place, and Sons and Lovers; he won an Academy Award for From Here to Eternity. He died, aged 50, in 1962 at home in Beverly Hills, California from a heart attack

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute