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Agnes Varda

Agnes Varda

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: May 30, 1928 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Brussels, BE Profession: director, screenwriter, still photographer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Agnes Varda is often called the "grandmother of the New Wave." Although not a member of the Cahiers du cinema critical fraternity which formed the core of this movement, the Belgian-born Varda completed her first feature, "La Pointe Courte," in 1954, five years before the New Wave's first films. With almost no academic or technical knowledge of film (though she had been a still photographer for Jean Vilar's Theatre National Populaire), Varda told two parallel tales (a structure inspired by William Faulkner's "Wild Palms"): the jagged romance of a young married couple and the struggles of the fishermen in the village of La Pointe Courte. Critic Georges Sadoul called this work "certainly the first film of the Nouvelle Vague" and it set the tone for Varda's career to come, combining fiction with documentary and also, in its debt to Faulkner, illustrating Varda's desire to expand the language of film. "I had the feeling," she said later, "that the cinema was not free, above all in its form, and that annoyed me. I wanted to make a film exactly as one writes a novel." Unfortunately for Varda, "La Pointe Courte" (which was edited by Alain Resnais, who initially refused to work on it because Varda's...

Agnes Varda is often called the "grandmother of the New Wave." Although not a member of the Cahiers du cinema critical fraternity which formed the core of this movement, the Belgian-born Varda completed her first feature, "La Pointe Courte," in 1954, five years before the New Wave's first films. With almost no academic or technical knowledge of film (though she had been a still photographer for Jean Vilar's Theatre National Populaire), Varda told two parallel tales (a structure inspired by William Faulkner's "Wild Palms"): the jagged romance of a young married couple and the struggles of the fishermen in the village of La Pointe Courte. Critic Georges Sadoul called this work "certainly the first film of the Nouvelle Vague" and it set the tone for Varda's career to come, combining fiction with documentary and also, in its debt to Faulkner, illustrating Varda's desire to expand the language of film. "I had the feeling," she said later, "that the cinema was not free, above all in its form, and that annoyed me. I wanted to make a film exactly as one writes a novel."

Unfortunately for Varda, "La Pointe Courte" (which was edited by Alain Resnais, who initially refused to work on it because Varda's techniques were close to those which he was developing) would be the only feature she would make in the 1950s. Although she lit the fuse under the New Wave, it was not until the explosive feature debuts of her male counterparts that Varda received another opportunity to direct a feature, "Cleo From 5 to 7" (1961), which established her as a significant talent on the international film scene. In "Cleo," the story of two hours of a woman's life as she waits to hear if she has cancer, we witness the emergence of a great Varda theme, borrowed from Simone de Beauvoir: "One isn't born a woman, one becomes one."

From her first film to her most recent projects, Varda has shown a strong connection to the Earth, becoming a kind of cinematic Mother Nature, whose characters have been personifications of wood and iron ("La Pointe Courte"), sickly trees ("Vagabond," 1985), animals ("Les Creatures," 1966) and food ("Apple" of "One Sings, The Other Doesn't" 1977). The world of Agnes Varda is one expansive Garden of Eden, where characters can live without the human burden of morality or sin, whether that world is the French Riviera (the short "Du cote de la cote" 1958), the city ("Cleo from 5 to 7"), or the country ("Le Bonheur," 1965; "Les Creatures," "Vagabond"). Varda knows that this Eden is a mythical place which exists only in the minds of her main characters and for this reason, her films also contain contrasting elements: troubled characters (the struggling fishermen of "La Pointe Courte" or the suicidal wife of "Le Bonheur") or less picturesque surroundings (the frozen landscape of "Vagabond").

Although Varda's initial impact on cinema was a powerful one, by the mid-1960s her career as a commercial filmmaker began to wane. After the improvisational and obscure "Lions Love" (1969), about an avant-garde woman director who goes to Hollywood, Varda completed only one more fictional commercial feature over the next fifteen years--the epic feminist tale of womanhood and motherhood, "One Sings, the Other Doesn't." She remained active by directing numerous shorts and documentaries, but much of her work went unseen or unnoticed.

It was not until the mid-80s that Varda reemerged in the commercial realm. While "Kung Fu Master!" (1987) was a misnamed and rather tentative story of the abortive romance between a middle-aged woman (Jane Birkin) and a 14 year-old video game buff (played by Varda's son Mathieu), "Vagabond," a documentary-style feature about a young French female wanderer, was arguably her best work to date. It dealt with all her major concerns: the independence of women, the coexistence with nature, the need for freedom, the acceptance of chance, the cyclical nature of birth and death, the personification of nature, and the seamless blending of documentary and fiction. Sadly the illness and death of Varda's husband, filmmaker Jacques Demy, helped to inspire her affectionate docu-valentine to his youth in "Jacquot/Jacquot de Nantes" (1992).

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

2.
  Cinevardaphoto (2005) Director
3.
  Gleaners and I, The (2000) Director
4.
5.
7.
  Jacquot (1991) Director
8.
  Le Petit Amour (1988) Director
9.
  Jane B. par Agnes V. (1988) Director
10.
  Vagabond (1985) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
2.
3.
 Truth About Charlie, The (2002) The Widow Hyppolite
4.
5.
7.
 Jane B. par Agnes V. (1988) Herself
8.
 Great Directors (2010)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Grew up in her mother's home town of Sete in France
1947:
While a student, became photographer for Theater Festival of Avignon
1951:
Hired by Jean Vilar to be official photographer for Theatre National Populaire
:
Recevied photojournalism assignments which took her all over Europe during the 1950s
1954:
Debut as screenwriter, director and producer with "La pointe courte"
:
Directed two documentary travelogues commissioned by the French Tourist Office, "O saisons, o chateaux" and "Du cote de la Cote"
1977:
Founded Cine-Tamaris, a production company, to produce "One Sings, the Other Doesn't"
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Education

Lycee Victor Duruy: -
Sorbonne, University of Paris: -
College de Sete: -
Ecole du Louvre: -
Ecole de Vaugirard: -

Notes

"In my films I always wanted to make people see deeply. I don't want to show things, but to give people the desire to see." --Agnes Varda (from Sadoul's "Dictionary of Film Makers")

Companions close complete companion listing

husband:
Jacques Demy. Director. Together from 1959; married from 1962 until his death on October 27, 1990 at age 59; made such films as "Lola" (1961) and "The Umbrellas of Cherbourg" (1964).

Family close complete family listing

father:
Eugene Jean Varda. Engineer. Greek.
mother:
Christiane Pasquet. French; came from Sete, a small seaport in the south of France near Montpellier; died in 1990.
daughter:
Rosalie Varda. Costume designer. Born in 1958; appeared as the 17 year-old Marie in "One Sings, the Other Doesn't" (1976); has designed costumes for Varda's and Jacques Demy's films as well as films including Jean-Luc Godard's "Passion" (1982).
son:
Mathieu Demy. Actor. Born in 1972; father, Jacques Demy; has appeared in films by both his parents, including Varda's "One Sings, the Other Doesn't" (1976) and "Kung Fu Master!" (1987) and as the voice of the small clown in Demy's animated film, "The Turning Table" (1988).
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