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Lana Turner

Lana Turner

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The Three... To the cry of "all for one and one for all" comes a version of the Dumas classic... more info $5.99was $19.98 Buy Now

Portrait In... Portrait In BlackLana Turner and Anthony Quinn star as an adulterous couple who... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

The Prodigal... The Biblical parable of the prodigal son inspires this sprawling Bible epic,... more info $5.98was $5.98 Buy Now

Ziegfeld Girl... Nobody knew how to create a spectacular show-stopping number better than Busby... more info $5.99was $19.98 Buy Now

The Postman... John Garfield and Lana Turner give the performances of a lifetime in "The... more info $5.99was $19.98 Buy Now

The Sea Chase... American hero John Wayne plays a German in "The Sea Chase" (1955), a suspenseful... more info $5.99was $12.98 Buy Now

Also Known As: Julia Jean Mildred Frances Turner Died: June 29, 1995
Born: February 8, 1920 Cause of Death: throat cancer
Birth Place: Wallace, Idaho, USA Profession: Cast ... actor
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BIOGRAPHY

In her reign as a movie goddess of the 1940s and early 1950s, Lana Turner came to crystallize the opulent heights to which show business could usher a small-town girl, as well as its darkest, most tragic and narcissistic depths. In her years as a top box office draw, she and longtime studio MGM forged her statuesque form into any number of pop cultural effigies: the stuff of both starry-eyed legend and tabloid-feeding frenzies; of coquettish sensuality to the G.I.'s of World War II; and later of smoldering elegance, a bedazzling glamour girl and the archetypal, scheming femme fatale. Her apocryphal "discovery" at Schwab's Drug Store made her a textbook example of sun-drenched Hollywood dream-making, even as she would become a queen of the darkling plane of film noir as a sultry human pressure cooker erupting with lust and malice in her most fondly recalled film, "The Postman Always Rings Twice" (1946). But more visceral, real-life noir would shadow her through a rollercoaster journey of ill-considered and scandalous marriages and relationships, a legacy most ignominiously highlighted by a violent mobster bleeding to death in her home, leading to a tearful testimony in court that the press would snarkily call "her greatest performance."

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