skip navigation
François Truffaut

François Truffaut

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (2)

Recent DVDs

 
 

The 400 Blows: Essential Art House... In 1959, François Truffaut burst upon the scene, heralding the French New Wave... more info $19.95was $19.95 Buy Now

Close Encounters Of The Third Kind: 30th... Steven Spielberg wrote and directed this game changing science fiction... more info $19.99was $19.99 Buy Now

Day For Night DVD "Day For Night" (1973) is the classic Oscar-winning Best Foreign Language Film,... more info $12.98was $12.98 Buy Now

The Green Room DVD In an unusual twist, François Truffaut stars in this haunting tale of a man... more info $19.95was $19.95 Buy Now

Also Known As: Died: October 21, 1984
Born: February 6, 1932 Cause of Death: brain tumor
Birth Place: Paris, FR Profession: director, critic, screenwriter, producer, actor, reporter, welder, sales clerk, messenger

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

His academic demeanor and quiet professionalism masked a childhood scarred by abandonment and anger, but the films of François Truffaut - from his auspicious debut with "The 400 Blows" in 1959 to his stylish Hitchcock homage "Confidentially Yours" in 1983 - told the whole of the story through the protective prism of cinema. Born to an unwed mother and neglected in his adolescence, Truffaut took solace in the movie houses of Nazi-occupied Paris, where his psyche was sculpted by cinema. A high school dropout, he founded his own film society at the age of 16 and resorted to theft to feed his passion. Encouraged by film theorist André Bazin, Truffaut began contributing essays and reviews to the film magazine Cahiers du Cinéma, where he excoriated bourgeois French filmmakers while lauding certain Hollywood studio directors as true auteurs. Lauded at home alongside such other nouvelle vague figureheads as Jean-Luc Godard, Éric Rohmer, Claude Chabrol and Jacques Rivette, Truffaut was acclaimed also in the United States, where "Shoot the Piano Player" (1960), "Jules and Jim" (1962) and "Stolen Kisses" (1968) charmed American critics and art house audiences alike and where "Day for Night" (1973) and "The...

His academic demeanor and quiet professionalism masked a childhood scarred by abandonment and anger, but the films of François Truffaut - from his auspicious debut with "The 400 Blows" in 1959 to his stylish Hitchcock homage "Confidentially Yours" in 1983 - told the whole of the story through the protective prism of cinema. Born to an unwed mother and neglected in his adolescence, Truffaut took solace in the movie houses of Nazi-occupied Paris, where his psyche was sculpted by cinema. A high school dropout, he founded his own film society at the age of 16 and resorted to theft to feed his passion. Encouraged by film theorist André Bazin, Truffaut began contributing essays and reviews to the film magazine Cahiers du Cinéma, where he excoriated bourgeois French filmmakers while lauding certain Hollywood studio directors as true auteurs. Lauded at home alongside such other nouvelle vague figureheads as Jean-Luc Godard, Éric Rohmer, Claude Chabrol and Jacques Rivette, Truffaut was acclaimed also in the United States, where "Shoot the Piano Player" (1960), "Jules and Jim" (1962) and "Stolen Kisses" (1968) charmed American critics and art house audiences alike and where "Day for Night" (1973) and "The Story of Adele H." (1975) won Academy Awards. Truffaut's death from a brain tumor in 1984 robbed international cinema of one of its great practitioners, as well as a brilliant decoder of complex human emotions both writ large and up close and personal.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Confidentially Yours (1984) Director
2.
  Woman Next Door, The (1981) Director
3.
  The Last Metro (1980) Director
4.
  Love on the Run (1979) Director
5.
6.
  The Man Who Loved Women (1977) Director
7.
  Small Change (1976) Director
8.
  The Story of Adele H (1975) Director
9.
  Day for Night (1973) Director
10.

CAST: (feature film)

1.
2.
 The Green Room (1978)
3.
 The Man Who Loved Women (1977) Man At Funeral
4.
 Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) Claude Lacombe
5.
 Small Change (1976) Martine'S Father
6.
 Day for Night (1973) Ferrand--The Director
7.
 Two English Girls (1971) Narration
8.
 The Wild Child (1970) Dr. Jean Itard
9.
 The Army Game (1963)
10.
 Breathless (1961)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Lived with grandmother until eight years of age; quit school at 14 and worked as messenger, then as sales clerk; joined Paris cine-clubs
1948:
With Robert Lachenay formed own cine-club, Cercle Cinemane
1949:
Hired as reporter at "Elle" (date approximate)
1950:
Published first film article in "Bulletin of the Latin Quarter Cine-Club"
1950:
First film appearance (a bit part) in Rene Clement's "Le Chateau De Verre"
1951:
Became film critic for Andre Bazin's "Cahiers du Cinema"
1951:
Served in National Service from which he deserted, was caught and dishonorably discharged
1953:
Employed by the Service Cinematographique of the Ministry of Agriculture; fired after few months
1954:
Began directing amateur 16mm shorts with "Une viste"
1956:
Appeared as himself in the short film, "Le Coup de Berger", directed by Jacques Rivette
:
Worked as assistant to Roberto Rossellini on three of his unreleased films
1957:
Directed first short film, "Les Mistons"
1958:
Founded own film company, Les Films du Carrosse (named after Jean Renior's film, "Le Carrose d'Or")
1959:
Feature film directing debut with "Les Quatre Cents Coups/The 400 Blows"
1959:
Wrote original story and appeared in Jean-Luc Godard's "A bout de souffle/Breathless"
1968:
With Godard and Lelouche helped organized protests over dismissal of Henri Langlois, head of Cinematheque Francaise; instigated shutting down of Cannes Festival that year
1970:
Played first major acting role in a feature, "L'enfant sauvage/The Wild Child", which he also directed
1977:
American film acting debut, "Close Encounters of the Third Kind"
1978:
Last acting role in a feature film, "La Chambre Verte/The Green Room", which he also directed
1983:
Directed last film, "Vivement Dimanche/Confidentially Yours"
1983:
Hospitalized with cerebral hemorrhage
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Lycee Rollin: -

Notes

"If you like, you could call my cinema one of compromise in that I think constantly about the public, but not one of concessions, since I never put in a comic effect that I haven't laughed at, nor a sad one that hasn't moved me."--Francois Truffaut (in Georges Sadoul's "Dictionary of Film Makers")

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Madeleine Morgenstern. Married on October 29, 1957; divorced; daughter of a French film producer.
companion:
Catherine Deneuve. Actor.
companion:
Fanny Ardant. Actor. One daughter with Truffaut, Josephine, born in 1983.

Family close complete family listing

step-father:
Roland Truffaut.
mother:
Janine Monferrand.
daughter:
Laura Truffaut. Born 1959; mother, Madeleine Morgenstern.
daughter:
Eva Truffaut. Born 1961; mother, Madeleine Morgenstern.
daughter:
Josephine Truffaut. Born 1983; mother Fanny Ardant.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"The Films of My Life"

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute