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Quentin Tarantino

Quentin Tarantino

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Inglourious Basterds DVD It's Brad Pitt against the Nazis in Quentin Tarantino's WWII revenge fantasy... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Reservoir Dogs DVD Quentin Tarantino's groundbreaking "Reservoir Dogs" (1992) broke all the... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

Reservoir Dogs / Bad Lieutenant (Double... A double dose of criminal mischief is in store for you. This DVD features two... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Kill Bill: Volume 1 DVD Quentin Tarantino launches his ultimate tale of vengeance in this riveting... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

Kill Bill: Volume 2 DVD Quentin Tarantino follows up his first mega-violent, slick, action-packed epic... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

Pulp Fiction DVD Filmmakers don't set out to make a cult classic, but when the story, actors and... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

Also Known As: Quentin Jerome Tarantino Died:
Born: March 27, 1963 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Knoxville, Tennessee, USA Profession: director, actor, screenwriter, executive, producer, video sales clerk, telephone sales representative, usher (at the Pussycat Theater in Torrance, CA)

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

The career of Quentin Tarantino instantly became the stuff of Hollywood legend, thanks to winning an Oscar, Golden Globe and numerous critics' awards for Best Original Screenplay for the groundbreaking and much-imitated "Pulp Fiction" (1994). Having famously learned his art while working as a video store clerk after dropping out of high school, Tarantino burst onto the scene first as a writer, penning the original drafts of Tony Scott's "True Romance" (1993) and Oliver Stone's "Natural Born Killers" (1994). Prior to that, he was a cause célèbre at the 1992 Sundance Film Festival with his breakout heist-gone-wrong thriller "Reservoir Dogs" (1992). But it was "Pulp Fiction" that caught the attention of Hollywood, with the entertainment press selecting him - for better or worse - as the symbol of a new generation of hot, young directors. Tarantino followed up with the critically hailed "Jackie Brown" (1997), an adaptation of Elmore Leonard's Rum Punch, only to stumble as an actor in a stage revival of "Wait Until Dark" (1998). Tarantino returned to the director's chair for the epic martial arts flicks "Kill Bill vol. 1" (2003) and "Kill Bill vol. 2" (2004), which were originally intended to be one...

The career of Quentin Tarantino instantly became the stuff of Hollywood legend, thanks to winning an Oscar, Golden Globe and numerous critics' awards for Best Original Screenplay for the groundbreaking and much-imitated "Pulp Fiction" (1994). Having famously learned his art while working as a video store clerk after dropping out of high school, Tarantino burst onto the scene first as a writer, penning the original drafts of Tony Scott's "True Romance" (1993) and Oliver Stone's "Natural Born Killers" (1994). Prior to that, he was a cause célèbre at the 1992 Sundance Film Festival with his breakout heist-gone-wrong thriller "Reservoir Dogs" (1992). But it was "Pulp Fiction" that caught the attention of Hollywood, with the entertainment press selecting him - for better or worse - as the symbol of a new generation of hot, young directors. Tarantino followed up with the critically hailed "Jackie Brown" (1997), an adaptation of Elmore Leonard's Rum Punch, only to stumble as an actor in a stage revival of "Wait Until Dark" (1998). Tarantino returned to the director's chair for the epic martial arts flicks "Kill Bill vol. 1" (2003) and "Kill Bill vol. 2" (2004), which were originally intended to be one film. After helming the "Death Proof" featurette in "Grind House" (2007), his gory collaboration with friend Robert Rodriguez, Tarantino returned to his Oscar-caliber ways with "Inglorious Basterds" (2009) and "Django Unchained" (2012). Regardless of what his harshest critics might have said, Tarantino remained a true auteur able to make his own films in an otherwise restrictive Hollywood system.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
3.
  Grindhouse (2007)
4.
  Sin City (2005) Special Guest Director
5.
  Kill Bill Vol. 1 (2002) Director
6.
  Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2002) Director
7.
  Jackie Brown (1997) Director
8.
  Four Rooms (1995) Director ("The Man From Hollywood")
9.
  Pulp Fiction (1994) Director
10.
  Reservoir Dogs (1992) Director

CAST: (feature film)

5.
 Grindhouse (2007)
7.
10.
 Words In Progress (2004) Himself
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Began making (unfinished) first film "My Best Friend's Birthday" from a screenplay co-written with Craig Hamann; they both co-starred
1985:
Spent five years working at Video Archives, a well-stocked video store in Manhattan Beach, CA; co-worker was future writing collaborator Roger Avary
:
Hired with Avary as production assistants for a Dolph Lundgren video after impressing producer John Langley, a regular customer at Video Archives, with their film knowledge
:
Met future producer Lawrence Bender while working at Cinetel Productions
1990:
Made acting debut as an Elvis impersonator on an episode of NBC's "The Golden Girls"
1990:
Commissioned to write a screenplay based on six-page story by Robert Kurtzman (co-founder of the special effects makeup company KNB Effects); eventually became "From Dusk Till Dawn"
1991:
Formed A Band Apart Productions with producer Lawrence Bender
1992:
Premiered directorial debut "Reservoir Dogs" at Sundance Film festival; also co-wrote (with Avary) and co-starred as Mr. Brown
1992:
Met future collaborator, writer-director Robert Rodriguez, at Toronto Film Festival
1993:
First film as screenwriter only, "True Romance"; directed by Tony Scott and co-starred Christian Slater and Patricia Arquette
1994:
Directed, co-wrote, and acted in breakthrough feature "Pulp Fiction"; co-starred John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Samuel L. Jackson, and Bruce Willis
1994:
Received strong notices for his performance in "Sleep With Me"
1994:
Received story credit for Oliver Stone's "Natural Born Killers"
1994:
First film as producer only, "Killing Zoe"; Roger Avary's debut as a writer-director
1995:
Formed Rolling Thunder (with Bender), a specialty distribution label under Miramax Pictures, designed to acquire, distribute, and market their films
1995:
With Bender, launched A Band Apart Commercials, a commercial production house under the Miramax banner
1995:
Played first feature lead, Johnny Destiny in "Destiny Turns on the Radio"
1995:
Made TV directing debut with "Motherhood," an episode of hit NBC medical drama "ER"
1995:
First collaboration with writer-director Rodriguez, played a small role in "Desperado"
1996:
Appeared in and wrote the script for Robert Rodriguez's "From Dusk Till Dawn"
1997:
With Bender, launched A Band Apart Records to market and distribute recordings made on Madonna's Maverick label
1997:
Wrote and directed "Jackie Brown," an adaptation of Elmore Leonard's novel <i>Rum Punch</i>; tailored lead role for Pam Grier
1998:
Starred on stage opposite Marisa Tomei in a revival of "Wait Until Dark"
2000:
Featured in "Little Nicky," starring Adam Sandler
2001:
Produced U.S. release of Hong Kong martial arts film "Iron Monkey"
2002:
Played recurring guest role on ABC's action drama series "Alias"
2003:
Wrote "Kill Bill" script for Uma Thurman; was scheduled to direct in 2001 but was postponed after Thurman became pregnant; film released in two volumes "Kill Bill Vol. 1" (2003) and "Kill Bill Vol. 2" (2004)
2004:
Brought Chinese martial arts film "Hero" to U.S.
2005:
Directed fifth season finale of "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" (CBS); earned Emmy nomination
2005:
Produced Eli Roth's horror feature "Hostel"
2007:
Helmed "Death Proof," the slasher-themed half of goretastic double feature "Grind House," a collaboration with Robert Rodriguez
2009:
Wrote and directed "Inglourious Basterds," about a group of U.S. soldiers in Nazi occupied France during WWII; earned Golden Globe and Oscar nominations for Best Director and Best Screenplay and a Directors Guild nomination for Outstanding Directorial Achievement
2009:
Nominated for the 2009 Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture ("Inglourious Basterds")
2009:
Nominated for the 2009 Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film ("Inglourious Basterds")
2009:
Nominated for the 2009 Academy Award for Best Achievement in Directing ("Inglourious Basterds")
2012:
Helmed and wrote screenplay for "Django Unchained," a Western drama set in Mississippi; also appeared in film
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Notes

"But the extent to which energy and drama have been missing from the film is almost embarrassingly revealed by the strong final party. A hilarious recurring riff by helmer Quentin Tarantino, in which he delivers a convoluted but coherent interpretation of "Top Gun" as a gay film, packs more punch than anything else in the picture..."---From review of "Sleep With Me" by Todd McCarthy Daily Variety May 16, 1994

"A spectacularly entertaining piece of pop culture, "Pulp Fiction" is the "American Graffitti" of violent crime pictures ... Tarantino positions himself as the Preston Sturges of crimeland, putting the most incongruous words and thoughts into the mouths of lowdown, amoral characters."---From review of "Pulp Fiction" by Todd McCarthy Daily Variety May 23, 1994

While attending a screening for "Pulp Fiction" Tarantino allegedly stood up in the front row and asked the audience who among them liked his earlier films, "Reservoir Dogs" and "True Romance". After many hands were raised, he asked who liked "The Remains of the Day"; those who responded were told to "Get the f--k out of this theater." --From Daily News, June 26, 1994.

"Watching 'Pulp Fiction', you don't just get engrossed in what's happening on screen. You get intoxicated by it--high on the rediscovery of how pleasurable a movie can be. I'm not sure I've ever encountered a filmmaker who combined discipline and control with sheer wild-ass joy the way Tarantino does. For 2 hours and 35 minutes, we're drawn into the lives of violently impassioned underworld characters--hit men, drug dealers, lethal vamps--who become figments of fury and grace and desire. We're caught up in dialogue of such fiendishly elaborate wit it suggests a Martin Scorsese film written by Preston Sturges, in plot twists--they're closer to zigzags--that are like whims bubbling up from the director's unconscious. 'Pulp Fiction' is the work of a new-style punk virtuoso. It is, quite simply, the most exhilarating piece of filmmaking to come along in the nearly five years I've been writing. " --From Owen Gleiberman's review of "Pulp Fiction", Entertainment Weekly, October 14, 1994.

Tarantino's nomination for Outstanding Directorial Achievement by the Directors Guild of America for "Pulp Fiction" made him the first American-born non-DGA member to be so honored.

As a guest on PBS' "Charlie Rose" (from c. 1994 around the time of the release of "Pulp Fiction"; rebroadcast on August 25, 1995), Tarantino revealed the titles of his three favorite films: "Rio Bravo" (Howard Hawks, 1959); "Taxi Driver" (Martin Scorsese, 1976); and "Blow Out" (Brian DePalma, 1981).

Tarantino said he is patterning Rolling Thunder on World Northal, a US distribution company that released most of the major kung fu movies in the 1970s. "I want dynamic, visceral films that are exploitation in nature. It says something that the most dynamic, in-your-face foreign movie currently in release is "Belle de Jour"," Tarantino said, referring to Miramax's recent release of Luis Bunuel's 1967 classic.

Tarantino said he and Bender intend to estabish two theaters in both New York and Los Angeles where Rolling Thunder films will open initially and--depending on a film's success--will go out to other cities later. He said that Hong Kong kung fu films would be released with new subtitles he would supervise in the New York and L.A. houses, but would be released in dubbed versions in urban areas to attract black and Latino audiences.---From "Take Cover! Tarantino Forms Rolling Thunder" by Kirk Honeycutt, The Hollywood Reporter July 14, 1995

"Since designers starting sending me free stuff to wear, it's kind of taken the fun out of shopping." Even worse, he complains to US, "I'd like to hang out with Warren Beatty. I don't have the time."---From "Talking Movies: Tarantino's Trajectory" by Anna Scotti, Buzz April 1996

I don't know...It's just this cool connection that happened while we were doing Pulp Fiction. I mean, von Sternberg had Marlene Dietrich, Hitchcock had Ingrid Bergman, Andre Techine had Catherine Deneuve. It's a special bond that I'm proud to have, and hopefully, one day, people will reference me and Uma like they do the others. But the thing about it is, it just kind of is, and there are certain things I don't really want to understand subtexturally. I just want it to be and do.''---Tarantino on Uma Thurman being called his muse to Rolling Stones April 2004

Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Allison Anders. Director. No longer together.
companion:
Margaret Cho. Actor, comic. No longer together.
companion:
Mira Sorvino. Actor. Together from c. January 1996 to February 1998.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Tony Tarantino.
mother:
Connie Zastoupil. Corporate executive. Works for a home medical organization; part-Cherokee.
step-father:
Curt Zastoupil. Musician.

Bibliography close complete biography

"Quentin Tarantino: Shooting From the Hip" Overlook Press
"Quentin Tarantino: The Cinema of Cool" Applause Books
"Quentin Tarantino: The Man and His Movies" HarperPerennial

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