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Tom Stoppard

Tom Stoppard

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: July 3, 1937 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession: Writer ...
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MILESTONES

1939:
Fled Czechoslovakia with mother to live in Singapore because of Jewish heritage
1942:
Moved with mother and brother to India
1945:
After mother's remarriage, family settled in Bristol, England
1954:
Worked as journalist for <i>Western Daily Press</i> in Bristol, England
:
Wrote for the Bristol <i>Evening World</i>
:
Was a freelance reporter
1962:
Briefly associated with <i>Scene</i>, a satirical magazine conceived by Peter Cook
1963:
First play performed on British TV, "A Walk on Water"
1964:
Wrote first radio play, "The Dissolution of Dominic Boot"
1965:
First produced stage play, "The Gamblers" at Bristol's Old Vic Theatre
1967:
Breakthrough stage work, "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead"; produced in both London and NYC; earned first Tony Award for Best Play
1968:
First London production of "The Real Inspector Hound"; performed as part of a 1972 double-bill with his "After Magritte" in NYC
1970:
Wrote screenplay for 44-minute film "The Engagement"
1973:
Debuted as stage director with British production of "Born Yesterday"
1974:
Had successful productions of "Travesties" in London and NYC; earned second Tony Award for Best Play
1975:
First feature screenplay, Joseph Losey's "The Romantic Englishwoman"; co-wrote with Thomas Wiseman from Wiseman's novel
1978:
Adapted the screenplay for "Despair" from the work by Vladimir Nabokov
1979:
Adapted Graham Greene's novel "The Human Factor" for the screen; last film directed by Otto Preminger
1984:
Picked up third Best Play Tony for "The Real Thing"
1985:
Received Oscar nomination for his contributions to the screenplay of "Brazil," co-written with Terry Gilliam and Charles McKeown
1987:
Adapted J.G. Ballard's novel "Empire of the Sun" for the screen; directed by Steven Spielberg
1990:
Feature directorial debut, "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead"
1990:
Using the language of his birth, translated Vaclav Havel's "Largo Desolato"
1990:
Adapted John Le Carre's novel "The Russia House" for the screen
1991:
Scripted Robert Benton's "Billy Bathgate"; adapted from the E.L. Doctorow novel
1993:
First production of "Arcadia" in London
1995:
NYC production of "Arcadia"; earned a Tony Award nomination for Best Play
1997:
Knighted by Queen Elizabeth II
1997:
Wrote stage play "The Invention of Love" based on the life of English poet and classical scholar A. E. Housman
1998:
Adapted Robert Parker's "Poodle Springs" as an HBO movie directed by Bob Rafelson
1998:
Co-wrote award-winning screenplay "Shakespeare in Love"
1999:
Reportedly did uncredited rewrite on Tim Burton's "Sleepy Hollow"
2000:
Contributed English translation of the script for the period drama "Vatel"; screened at Cannes
2001:
Penned the WWII-era spy drama "Enigma"; screened at Sundance
2001:
"The Invention of Love" opened on Broadway; earned a Tony nomination
2002:
Penned the trilogy "The Coast of Utopia," which focused on the philosophical debates in pre-revolutionary Russia between 1833 and 1866; plays entitled <i>Voyage</i>, <i>Shipwreck</i>, and <i>Salvage</i>, and totaled nine hours in length
2006:
Opened trilogy "The Coast of Utopia" on Broadway
2006:
Premiered play "Rock 'n' Roll" at the Royal Court Theatre
2007:
Reportedly did uncredited rewrite on "The Bourne Ultimatum," a film based on Robert Ludlum's best-selling novel
2007:
Saw NYC opening of "Rock 'n' Roll"; earned Tony nomination for Best Play
2012:
Returned to feature writing with adaptation of Leo Tolstoy's "Anna Karenina," directed by Joe Wright and starring Keira Knightley

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