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Eric Bogosian

Eric Bogosian

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Talk Radio DVD Academy Award-winning director Oliver Stone's "Talk Radio" (1998) stars Eric... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

A Bright Shining Lie DVD Vietnam was a devastating war. From the Communist North to the U.S. supported... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

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Under Siege 2: Dark Territory... MORE > $5.98 Regularly $5.98 Buy Now blu-ray

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The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial... MORE > $20.99 Regularly $20.99 Buy Now blu-ray

Also Known As: Died:
Born: April 24, 1953 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Woburn, Massachusetts, USA Profession: playwright, monologuist, actor, director, retail salesman

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Once described as the bard of the urban underbelly, protean "downtown" performance artist Eric Bogosian established himself as one of the wittiest, most incisive chroniclers of the bloat and sleaze of the 1980s. In a series of highly acclaimed one-man shows, he combined black humor and an aggressive, confrontational energy with an underlying charm to make pointed social commentary about the environment, racism, sexism and human behavior in general. Bogosian had responded to an ad to learn the commodities racket in the late 70s, but a job answering phones at The Kitchen, an avant-garde dance and performance space in Manhattan, turned up in the nick of time to right his course. His 1977 off-off Broadway debut "Careful Moment" was the first step on the road to many super-charged, bug-eyed solo performances, featuring a universe of hucksters and psychotics as diverse as a self-congratulating British pop star (modeled on Keith Richards), a scatological derelict and a cheating yuppie executive. Three of his one-man shows ("Drinking in America", "Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll", "Pounding Nails in the Floor with My Forehead") earned him well-deserved OBIE Awards.

Once described as the bard of the urban underbelly, protean "downtown" performance artist Eric Bogosian established himself as one of the wittiest, most incisive chroniclers of the bloat and sleaze of the 1980s. In a series of highly acclaimed one-man shows, he combined black humor and an aggressive, confrontational energy with an underlying charm to make pointed social commentary about the environment, racism, sexism and human behavior in general. Bogosian had responded to an ad to learn the commodities racket in the late 70s, but a job answering phones at The Kitchen, an avant-garde dance and performance space in Manhattan, turned up in the nick of time to right his course. His 1977 off-off Broadway debut "Careful Moment" was the first step on the road to many super-charged, bug-eyed solo performances, featuring a universe of hucksters and psychotics as diverse as a self-congratulating British pop star (modeled on Keith Richards), a scatological derelict and a cheating yuppie executive. Three of his one-man shows ("Drinking in America", "Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll", "Pounding Nails in the Floor with My Forehead") earned him well-deserved OBIE Awards.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Listen Up Philip (2014)
2.
3.
 Cadillac Records (2008)
5.
6.
 Blade: Trinity (2004) Bentley Tittle
7.
 Heights (2004) Cast
8.
 Khatchaturian (2003) Narrator
9.
 Wonderland (2003) Eddie Nash
10.
 Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle (2003) Alan Caufield
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Acted in a series of high school plays written and directed by his schoolmates Fred Zollo (a producer) and Nick Paleologus (a Massachusetts congressman)
1976:
Moved to Manhattan; first job was as a gofer at the Chelsea Westside Theatre; later appeared in performance pieces at the downtown arts center, The Kitchen
1977:
Made Off-Off Broadway debut with the one-man play, "Careful Moment"
1979:
Created the persona of Ricky Paul, a racist and sexist stand-up comedian, while perfoming at Tier 3 and the Mudd Club
1981:
Made Off-Broadway debut in double-bill of "Men Inside" and "Voices of America" at the New York Shakespeare Festival's Public Theatre
1982:
Film acting debut, "Born in Flames"
1983:
Wrote and starred in one-man play, "FunHouse" at the New York Shakespeare Festival's Public Theatre; directed by his wife Jo Anne Bonney
1984:
Made TV debut in guest appearance on NBC's "Miami Vice"
1985:
Played title role in "The Healer" episode of CBS' "The Twilight Zone"
1986:
Breakthrough performance piece, a series of urban monologues, "Drinking in America"; also aired on Cinemax as "Eric Bogosian Takes a Look at Drinking in America"
1987:
Co-wrote first short film, "Arena Brains"; also acted in film
1987:
Co-wrote first full-length play, "Talk Radio" with Tad Savinar (first shown at the Portland Center as a one-man performance piece in 1985; expanded for NYSF production directed by Zollo)
1988:
Co-wrote first feature, "Talk Radio," with director Oliver Stone; also starred
1988:
Made TV-movie acting debut in "The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial" (CBS), directed by Robert Altman
1990:
Portrayed Larry Rose, a former US Embassy staff member, in "The Last Flight Out," an NBC movie about the final days of the US involvement in Vietnam
1991:
Starred in a concert presentation of his one-man show, "Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll"
1992:
Made first appearance as defense attorney Gary Lowenthal on the NBC series, "Law & Order"
1993:
Premiered his one-man show, "Pounding Nails in the Floor with My Forehead," at Los Angeles' Mark Taper Forum
1994:
Delivered a first-rate performance as a Nixon-esque senator investigating black magic for Paul Schrader's "Witch Hunt" (HBO)
1994:
Surprised the theatrical world with a play set in and, entitled "subUrbia"; directed by Robert Falls at NYC's Lincoln Center; later adapted as a 1996 film directed by Richard Linklater
1994:
Had cameo as himself in "Naked in New York"
1994:
Appeared in the film, "Dolores Claiborne," adapted from Stephen King's novel
1995:
Played a crazy scientist who hijacks a train in "Under Seige 2: Dark Territory"
1995:
Contributed the voice of Phido, a Damon Runyonesque bird, to the animated musical "Arabian Knight"
1996:
Portrayed an agent in Daniel Sullivan's "The Substance of Fire"; adaptated by Jon Robin Baitz from his play
1996:
Co-created the short-lived ABC police drama, "High Incident"
1997:
Appeared in Woody Allen's "Deconstructing Harry" and HBO's Vietnam drama "A Bright Shining Lie"
1997:
Reportedly made uncredited contributions to the script for "Mad City"
1998:
Returned to the suburbs for his play "Griller" (also directed by Falls at Chicago's Goodman Theater)
1999:
Appeared in "Wake Up and Smell the Coffee"; directed by Jo Anne Bonney
2000:
Acted in Davis Guggenheim's "Gossip"
2002:
Cast in "Humpty Dumpty" at McCarter Theatre under the direction of Jo Bonney
2002:
Had a small role in "Igby Goes Down"
2002:
Cast in the historical drama feature, "Ararat"
2003:
Played Eddie Nash in "Wonderland," a film based on the Wonderland Murders starring Val Kilmer
2006:
Opened his play "Talk Radio" on Broadway
2006:
Cast in the short-lived CBS series, "Love Monkey"
2006:
Joined the cast of "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" (USA Network) as Captain Danny Ross
2010:
Cast in Manhattan Theatre Club's Broadway production of Donald Margulies' "Time Stands Still"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University of Chicago: Chicago , Illinois - 1971 - 1973
Oberlin College: Oberlin , Ohio - 1976

Notes

"I do believe that if you keep looking at the nasty stuff you don't want to look at, you can live with it better. It's better than just ignoring it." --Eric Bogosian quoted in Rolling Stone, January 12, 1989

"There might be some point in each character where they're the same, and that point is Eric. And I move out from that point into all these different people. The violent guys I play have something that's nice about them, and the nice guys I play have a mean streak." --Bogosian quoted in New York, December 12, 1988

"I'm not a fun guy. . . I'm not the type of person who will do anything to have people laugh, to have someone run up to you and ask for your autograph. I try to do nice characters sometimes, but they change on me. So the challenge is to do the dark guys, the very dark guys." --Eric Bogosian to THE NEW YORK TIMES, September 30, 1983

"Bogosian's piece ['Sex, Drugs and Rock & Roll'] blares away like an urban remix of 'Spoon River Anthology'--with studs, beggars, yuppies and poets all taking turns. These are difficult people to accept, a collection of curmudgeons you pray will never sit next to you on a bus or subway . . . but they raise difficult questions--about love, about money, about the future of the planet. They are the products of an angry mind that spits out characters like a manic copy machine." --Hillel Italie in Daily News. September 10, 1991

About his wife's role in his career: "She tells me when a bit isn't working. I do a lot of stuff on the road, so when I go to various audiences there's a tendency to go where the audience wants you to go. You hear the audience laughing and you don't hear the audience being moved. So laughter will pull you toward sillier and sillier stuff. She tends to strip away stuff that's obvious or silly.

"I was a bum when she met me. I was doing nothing all day long. Years later she told me she had never met anyone who did as little in a day as I did. In 1980, I would get up around noon and think about doing something and then not do it." --Bogosian to Nancy Churnin in Los Angeles Times, November 3, 1993

"In some ways, these plays ('subUrbia', 'Griller') are the real challenge. It's easy to write about colorful, extreme urban characters who aren't you. I'm the classic suburban guy who moves to the city and looks around at all these wild people and then writes about them. And then other suburban people come to see the show and say, 'Yeah, man, you really got that drunk guy down pat.' When the truth is, none of us really had any experience as a wino." --Bogosian, quoted in Chicago Tribune, January 21, 1998

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Jo Anne Bonney. Graphic designer, director. Married in October 1980, six weeks after they met; Australian; met when she hired him for $75 to record a disc jockey's voice for a short film she was making in 1980.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Henry Bogosian. Accountant.
mother:
Edwina Bogosian. Former hairdresser, teacher.
son:
Harris Wolf Bogosian. Born 1987; mother Jo Anne Bonney.

Bibliography close complete biography

"Drinking in America" Vantage
"Talk Radio" Vantage
"Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll" HarperCollins
"Notes from Underground (with Scenes from the New World)"
"Pounding Nails in the Floor with My Head" Theatre Communications Group (TCG)
"The Essential Bogosian" Theatre Communications Group (TCG)
"subUrbia" Theatre Communications Group (TCG)
VIEW COMPLETE BIBLIOGRAPHY

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