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Bob Steele

Bob Steele

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Also Known As: Bob Bradbury Jr., Robert North Bradbury Jr., Robert Steele, Bob Bradbury Jr. Died: December 21, 1988
Born: January 23, 1906 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Pendleton, Oregon, USA Profession: actor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Bob Steele was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. Steele's career in acting began with his roles in various films like "Lightning Speed" (1928), "Near the Rainbow's End" (1930) and "Headin' North" (1930). He also appeared in "The Ridin' Fool" (1931), "Near the Trail's End" (1931) and "The Nevada Buckaroo" (1931). His passion for acting continued to his roles in projects like "Gun Lords of Stirrup Basin" (1937), "The Trusted Outlaw" (1937) and "Lightnin' Crandall" (1937). He also appeared in "The Arizona Gunfighter" (1937). Toward the end of his career, he continued to act in the Humphrey Bogart crime picture "The Enforcer" (1951), the western "Silver Canyon" (1951) with Gene Autry and the western "Forth Worth" (1951) with Randolph Scott. He also appeared in the Joel McCrea western "Cattle Drive" (1951) and "Island in the Sky" (1953). Steele was most recently credited in "Wyatt Earp: Return to Tombstone" (CBS, 1993-94). Steele passed away in December 1988 at the age of 82.

Bob Steele was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. Steele's career in acting began with his roles in various films like "Lightning Speed" (1928), "Near the Rainbow's End" (1930) and "Headin' North" (1930). He also appeared in "The Ridin' Fool" (1931), "Near the Trail's End" (1931) and "The Nevada Buckaroo" (1931). His passion for acting continued to his roles in projects like "Gun Lords of Stirrup Basin" (1937), "The Trusted Outlaw" (1937) and "Lightnin' Crandall" (1937). He also appeared in "The Arizona Gunfighter" (1937). Toward the end of his career, he continued to act in the Humphrey Bogart crime picture "The Enforcer" (1951), the western "Silver Canyon" (1951) with Gene Autry and the western "Forth Worth" (1951) with Randolph Scott. He also appeared in the Joel McCrea western "Cattle Drive" (1951) and "Island in the Sky" (1953). Steele was most recently credited in "Wyatt Earp: Return to Tombstone" (CBS, 1993-94). Steele passed away in December 1988 at the age of 82.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Wyatt Earp: Return to Tombstone (1994) Deputy Sam
2.
 Nightmare Honeymoon (1972) Charlie
3.
 Skin Game (1971)
4.
 something big (1971) Teamster No. 3
5.
 Rio Lobo (1970) Deputy sheriff
6.
 The Great Bank Robbery (1969) 1st guard
7.
 Hang 'Em High (1968)
8.
 The Bounty Killer (1965) Red
9.
 Town Tamer (1965) Vigilante
10.
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1920:
Film acting debut in "The Adventures of Bob and Bill" (with his twin brother Bill)
1927:
Debut as cowboy film actor
1960:
Television acting debut in "F Troop"

Family close complete family listing

father:
Robert North Bradbury. Director.
brother:
Bill Bradbury. Actor. Twin.

Contributions

albatros1 ( 2008-01-09 )

Source: not available

The son of director Robert N. Bradbury, Bob Steele began his show-business career early: he was part of his family's vaudeville act at age two, and toured with them all over the West Coast. His short stature and scrappy nature were things that many young western fans could identify with and his films were quite popular. Steele often ventured into other genres, and gave acclaimed performances over the years, often playing against his "good-guy" cowboy image in such classic films as Of Mice and Men (1939) - in which he received some of the best reviews of his career as the sadistic Curley - and The Big Sleep (1946), and he was especially memorable as a cold-blooded mob triggerman in The Enforcer (1951). As Steele got older he became a familiar face to TV fans as a guest star in many, if not most, of the western series at the time, and at age 59 he landed the part he is best known for: the aging but cantankerous Trooper Duffy, who at the drop of a hat would began reminiscing about his fighting "shoulder to shoulder with Davy Crockett at the Alamo" in the western comedy series "F Troop" (1965). After a few more film appearances (including an impressive one as a remorseful member of a lynching party in Hang 'Em High (1968)), Steele retired from the screen in 1973. Bob Steele's long career, spanning more than 50 years and including appearances in more than 150 films, came to an end in 1988, when he died after a lengthy illness.

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