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Peter Bogdanovich

Peter Bogdanovich

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Also Known As: Derek Thomas Died:
Born: July 30, 1939 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Kingston, New York, USA Profession: director, actor, screenwriter, critic, producer, film programmer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

The Peter Bogdanovich story is a Hollywood tale through and through, replete with memorable associations and fantastic success, along with various ups and downs. Bogdanovich was a teenage actor in NYC and directed and produced an Off-Broadway production of Clifford Odets' "The Big Knife" at age 20. He worked as a film critic for such magazines as Film Culture, Movie and Esquire and began interviewing directors in the early '60s, writing monographs for the Metropolitan Museum of Art on Howard Hawks, Orson Welles and Alfred Hitchcock and publishing elsewhere the results of his talks with other luminaries like John Ford, Fritz Lang and Allan Dwan. Critics compared his breakout movie, "The Last Picture Show" (1971), to "Citizen Kane." "What's Up, Doc?" (1972) was his tribute to the screwball comedies of Howard Hawks. Starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan O'Neal, "What's Up, Doc?" was a huge success, just the prescription for a country weary of the Vietnam War. Bogdanovich followed with the Depression-era comedy-drama "Paper Moon" (1973), which marked the peak of his filmmaking fame. "Nickelodeon" (1976), recreating the early days of motion pictures, was also a success, but personal tragedy sidelined him for...

The Peter Bogdanovich story is a Hollywood tale through and through, replete with memorable associations and fantastic success, along with various ups and downs. Bogdanovich was a teenage actor in NYC and directed and produced an Off-Broadway production of Clifford Odets' "The Big Knife" at age 20. He worked as a film critic for such magazines as Film Culture, Movie and Esquire and began interviewing directors in the early '60s, writing monographs for the Metropolitan Museum of Art on Howard Hawks, Orson Welles and Alfred Hitchcock and publishing elsewhere the results of his talks with other luminaries like John Ford, Fritz Lang and Allan Dwan. Critics compared his breakout movie, "The Last Picture Show" (1971), to "Citizen Kane." "What's Up, Doc?" (1972) was his tribute to the screwball comedies of Howard Hawks. Starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan O'Neal, "What's Up, Doc?" was a huge success, just the prescription for a country weary of the Vietnam War. Bogdanovich followed with the Depression-era comedy-drama "Paper Moon" (1973), which marked the peak of his filmmaking fame. "Nickelodeon" (1976), recreating the early days of motion pictures, was also a success, but personal tragedy sidelined him for a time following the murder of companion Dorothy Stratten. He returned in 1985 with "Mask," which opened to good reviews, and was followed by "Texasville" (1990), a sequel to "The Last Picture Show," and "Noises Off" (1992), adapted from the hit stage play. Bogdanovich continued to care about and seek out directors from the early days of Hollywood, compiling a storehouse of anecdotal information about the pioneering days of Hollywood which found its way into "Who the Devil Made It?," a huge and valuable collection of his interviews with 16 great Hollywood directors that was published in 1997.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

3.
4.
  Cat's Meow, The (2001) Director
5.
  Saintly Switch, A (1999) Director
7.
  Price of Heaven, The (1997) Director
9.
  To Sir With Love II (1996) Director
10.
  Thing Called Love, The (1993) Director

CAST: (feature film)

2.
3.
4.
 Too Late (2015)
5.
 You Are Here (2014)
6.
 Pasadena (2013)
7.
 Casting By (2013)
8.
 Healer, The (2012)
10.
 Abandoned (2010)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1998:
Appeared as the leader of therapy group in "Mr. Jealousy"; co-starred and produced by Eric Stoltz
1985:
Directed the well received drama "Mask" co-starring Cher and Eric Stoltz
1968:
Feature directing and producing debut, "Targets," starring Boris Karloff and executive produced by Corman (also wrote and acted)
2003:
Had a supporting role as a fictional version of himself in the Showtime comedy series "Out of Order"
1966:
Hired as second unit director by Roger Corman for "Wild Angels"; claims to have done rewrites (uncredited), location scouting and editing; was hired after Corman read some of his film criticism
1990:
Returned to "Last Picture Show" territory with the sequel "Texasville" (produced, directed and scripted); was a critical and box office failure
2001:
Returned to directing features with "The Cat's Meow" (released theatrically in 2002)
1958:
Began writing film criticism for publications including <i>The New York Times</i>, <i>Esquire</i> and <i>Film Culture</i>
1996:
Directed a television sequel to 1967 feature film "To Sir With Love" (CBS) with Sidney Poitier reprising his role
1959:
Directed and co-produced the Off-Broadway staging of "The Big Knife"
1997:
Helmed another CBS movie, "The Price of Heaven"
1972:
Produced and directed "What's Up, Doc?" co-starring Ryan O'Neal and Barbra Streisand
1971:
Release of first documentary, "Directed by John Ford" (commissioned by the American Film Institute)
2000:
Returned to acting, playing the recurring role of Dr. Melfi's (Lorraine Bracco) psychotherapist in the HBO series "The Sopranos"; also directed a fifth season episode of the series
1971:
Won acclaim for directing "The Last Picture Show"; received Oscar nominations for Best Director and Best Screenplay (shared with Larry McMurtry)
1961:
Wrote monographs for the Museum of Modern Art Film Library on Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock and Howard Hawks
1993:
Directed "The Thing Called Love," about a country singer-songwriter who wants to make it big in Nashville; one of River Phoenix's last roles
:
Formed the Directors Company with Francis Ford Coppola and William Friedkin
1986:
Founded Crescent Moon Productions, Inc.
1998:
Had a cameo appearance in the feature "54"
1979:
Made a movie version of Paul Theroux's novel "Saint Jack"
:
Weekly film commentator for the CBS News program, "CBS This Morning"
1976:
Wrote and directed the heartfelt valentine to early days of moviemaking, "Nickelodeon"; third film with Ryan O'Neal; second with Tatum O'Neal
1958:
Acted with New York Shakespeare Festival
1973:
Again collaborated with O'Neal for "Paper Moon" (produced and directed); also co-starred a 10-year-old Tatum O'Neal who picked up a Supporting Actress Oscar; was the Directors Company's first offering
2007:
Appeared in Zoe Cassavetes' directorial debut, "Broken English"
2006:
Cast in the Truman Capote biopic "Infamous"
1966:
First feature film credit (as additional sequence director and narrator), "Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women" (credited as Derek Thomas)
1995:
Helmed segments of the Showtime anthology series' "Picture Windows" and "Fallen Angels"
1964:
Moved to California
1956:
Performed with American Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Connecticut
1974:
Provided companion Cybil Shepard with a starring vehicle, "Daisy Miller"; film received lackluster critical reception
1984:
Published the memoir, <i>The Killing of the Unicorn: Dorothy Stratten</i>
1981:
Released "They All Laughed"after Dorothy Stratten's murder; wrote screenplay and contributed music, in addition to directing; distributed film himself after failing to find a distributor due to the negative publicity surrounding the Stratten murder
1992:
Translated the door-slamming British sex farce from the stage to the screen as director of "Noises Off"
:
Worked as a film programmer for the New Yorker Theater in Manhattan
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Collegiate School: New York, New York -
Stella Adler Conservatory: New York, New York - 1954

Notes

"I always looked at them [Bogdanovich and Polly Platt] like a replay of the old saying about Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers: 'He gave her class, she gave him sex.' With Peter and Polly, it was: 'He gave her the nerve, she gave him all her best ideas.'" --an unidentified former friend of the couple, quoted in Movieline, c. 1995.

"I think [Fritz] Lang said he was advised don't have an affair with an actress. And Lang said, 'I didn't listen.' And I thought when I was doing the interview, I didn't know what was in store. That was five years before "The Last Picture Show" (and the affair with Cybill Shepherd). Well, it's an occupational hazard--you're creating somebody in a way." --Peter Bogdanovich to the Los Angeles Times, May 15, 1997.

" ... The generation that we're dealing with in my book, which covers 16 directors who were born between 1885 and 1924, grew up either with no films or silent films. Silent film was a medium in which the goal was to convey everything visually without dialogue and without titles.

"When sound came in, the whole question of 'how do you convey this fleeting thought, this plot point, this nuance of character visually' became, 'What kind of dialogue can we write?' There's the difference right there. It's only because the great veterans of the silent era--most of them--continued well into the talking era that the talkies from '29 to '61 or '62 had as much visual power and impact as they did. Despite the fact that sound or dialogue came to dominate, the most effective moments in all their films are still silent moments, and they knew that." --Bogdanovich in Moviemaker, January 1998.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Polly Platt. Production designer. Married in 1962; divorced in 1970; worked on his movies "Targets" through "Paper Moon"; mother of Bogdanovich's two children.
companion:
Cybill Shepherd. Actor. Together for eight years; relationship began during filming of "The Last Picture Show".
companion:
Dorothy Stratten. Model. Murdered by husband after he discovered her relationship with Bogdanovich; subject of Bob Fosse's biopic "Star 80" (1983); acted in "They All Laughed".
wife:
Louise Beatrice Hoogstraten. Actor. Born c. 1970; married on December 30, 1988; half-sister of Dorothy Stratten; credited in two movies as L B Straten; separated on February 16, 2001; she filed for divorce in March 2001.
VIEW COMPLETE COMPANION LISTING

Family close complete family listing

father:
Borislav Bogdanovich. Post-impressionist painter.
mother:
Herma Bogdanovich.
brother:
Antony Bogdanovich. Died in 1938 from burns sustained when mother accidentally spilled scalding soup on him.
daughter:
Antonia Bogdanovich. Photographer, actor. Born c. 1967; worked on "Texasville".
daughter:
Alexandra Welles Bogdanovich. Actor. Born c. 1970.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"The Cinema of Orson Welles" Film Library of the Museum of Modern Art
"The Cinema of Howard Hawks" Film Library of the Museum of Modern Art
"The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock" Film Library of the Museum of Modern Art
"John Ford" University of California Press
"Fritz Lang in America" Praeger
"Allan Dwan - The Last Pioneer" Praeger
"Pieces of Time" Arbor House
"Bogdanovich's Picture Shows" Scarecrow Press
"The Killing of the Unicorn: Dorothy Stratten (1960-1980)" William Morrow
"This Is Orson Welles" HarperCollins
"Picture Shows: The Life and Films of Peter Bogdanovich" Limelight Editions
"A Moment with Miss Gish" Saint Teresa Press
"Who the Devil Made It?: Conversations with Robert Aldrich, George Cukor, Allan Dwan, Howard Hawks, Alfred Hitchcock, Chuck Jones, Fritz Lang, Joseph H. Lewis, Sidney Lumet, Leo McCarey, Otto Preminger, Don Siegel, Josef von Sternberg, Frank Tashlin, Edgar G. Ulmer, Raoul Walsh" Alfred A. Knopf
"Peter Bogdanovich's Movie of the Week: 52 Classic Forms for One Full Year" Ballantine
VIEW COMPLETE BIBLIOGRAPHY

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