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Barbara Stanwyck

Barbara Stanwyck

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The Barbara Stanwyck Collection... Known for her passionate performances, Barbara Stanwyck was one of the brightest... more info $49.98was $49.98 Buy Now

Titanic (1953) DVD Studio ClassicsDetermined to remove her family from the superficial, high... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

The Barbara Stanwyck Show: Volume 1... Barbara Stanwyck played both host and leading woman in this Emmy-winning... more info $39.98was $39.98 Buy Now

Christmas In Connecticut (1945)... Relax and enjoy one of the classic holiday movies from the TCM Shop, like... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

Forty Guns DVD Notable gritty director Sam Fuller helmed this inventive Western tale which... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

The Violent Men DVD Glenn Ford stars alongside Barbara Stanwyck and Edward G. Robinson in this... more info $14.99was $14.99 Buy Now

Also Known As: Ruby Catherine Stevens Died: January 20, 1990
Born: July 16, 1907 Cause of Death: congestive heart failure
Birth Place: Brooklyn, New York, USA Profession: actor, chorus girl, model, clerk

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Barbara Stanwyck was a dazzling study in contrasts. At times sultry and sweet; vulnerable and tough; comedic and dramatic; joyous and tragic - she simply was one of the greatest and most unique actresses during Hollywood's Golden Era. She could play whatever the part required, whether it was madcap glamour in comedies like "The Lady Eve" (1941), tough-minded feminism in weepies like "Stella Dallas" (1937), or poisonous vixens in noir classics like "Double Indemnity" (1944). A working-class girl from Brooklyn, she became one of the richest women in the United States due to wise investments. On a personal level, she was wildly popular among her peers, yet died a virtual recluse. Most astounding of all, she gave some of the most unforgettable performances in film history, yet never won an Academy Award for her work. Like many an aging glamour girl, she moved reluctantly into TV in the 1950s and 1960s when her movie career declined, but became an even bigger star than she had been before. Barbara Stanwyck - an American original and the true essence of the word "dame" - like no other actress of her generation enjoyed a long, varied career in film and television while remaining beloved by her millions of...

Barbara Stanwyck was a dazzling study in contrasts. At times sultry and sweet; vulnerable and tough; comedic and dramatic; joyous and tragic - she simply was one of the greatest and most unique actresses during Hollywood's Golden Era. She could play whatever the part required, whether it was madcap glamour in comedies like "The Lady Eve" (1941), tough-minded feminism in weepies like "Stella Dallas" (1937), or poisonous vixens in noir classics like "Double Indemnity" (1944). A working-class girl from Brooklyn, she became one of the richest women in the United States due to wise investments. On a personal level, she was wildly popular among her peers, yet died a virtual recluse. Most astounding of all, she gave some of the most unforgettable performances in film history, yet never won an Academy Award for her work. Like many an aging glamour girl, she moved reluctantly into TV in the 1950s and 1960s when her movie career declined, but became an even bigger star than she had been before. Barbara Stanwyck - an American original and the true essence of the word "dame" - like no other actress of her generation enjoyed a long, varied career in film and television while remaining beloved by her millions of fans.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Going Hollywood: The War Years (1983) Herself (Archival Footage)
2.
 Letters, The (1973) Geraldine Parkington ("The Parkingtons: Dear Penelope")
3.
 Taste Of Evil, A (1971) Miriam Jannings
4.
 The Night Walker (1964) Irene Trent
5.
 Roustabout (1964) Maggie Morgan
6.
 Walk on the Wild Side (1962) Jo Courtney
7.
 Forty Guns (1957) Jessica Drummond
8.
 Trooper Hook (1957) Cora Sutliff
9.
 Crime of Passion (1957) Kathy [Ferguson] Doyle
10.
 These Wilder Years (1956) Ann Dempster
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Orphaned at the age of four and raised by older sister and other relatives
:
Began working at as a fashion model at age 13, and was a Ziegfeld Girl by the age of 15
1926:
Broadway debut in the chorus of "The Noose"; co-starred with actors Rex Cherryman and Wilfred Lucas
1926:
First starring role on Broadway in "Burlesque"
1927:
First film appearance was a minor part in "Broadway Nights" (silent film)
1929:
Feature leading role debut in "The Locked Door"
1930:
Under joint contract with Columbia and Warner Bros. inspired by success of feature "Ladies of Leisure"
1931:
Appeared in a starring role in the feature "Illicit"
1935:
Was one of the first stars to go independent when her Warner Bros. contract expired
1937:
Won acclaim for her role in "Stella Dallas"; earned first Best Actress Academy Award nomination
:
Returned to TV with "The Thorn Birds" (1983) and "Dynasty II: The Colbys"
1941:
Co-starred with Gary Cooper in "Ball of Fire"; earned second Best Actress Academy Award nomination
1941:
Most famous role was in "The Lady Eve," starring opposite Henry Fonda
1944:
Starred in the noir feature, "Double Indemnity"; received third Academy Award nomination for Best Actress
1948:
Played a spoiled, bedridden daughter of a millionaire in "Sorry, Wrong Number" earned fourth Best Actress Academy Award nomination
1954:
Appeared opposite Ronald Reagan in the western "Cattle Queen of Montana"
1957:
Last starring role in a feature for five years, "Forty Guns"
1957:
Cast in a recurring role on the NBC TV series, "Wagon Train"
1960:
Hosted her own show, "The Barbara Stanwyck Show" (NBC); earned the star her first Emmy Award
1962:
Returned to features in "Walk on the Wild Side"
1964:
Acted in her last feature film "The Night Walker"
1965:
Cast as head of a frontier family in the Western series "The Big Valley" (ABC)
1983:
Gave an Emmy Award-winning performance in the ABC mini-series, "The Thorn Birds"
1985:
Made three guest appearances on the hit primetime soap opera "Dynasty" (ABC) as Constance Colby Patterson
1985:
Reprised the role of Constance Colby Patterson on the first season of the spin-off series "The Colbys" (ABC)
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Erasmus Hall High School: Brooklyn , New York -

Notes

In 1944 the IRS claimed that Stanwyck was the highest-paid woman in the USA, with an annual salary of $400,000

Stanwyck changed her name from Ruby Stevens when she appeared in the Broadway play, "The Noose" in 1926. The inspiration was said to come from a theatrical poster which announced "Jane Stanwyck in 'Barbara Frietchie'".

"I would have to say that I have never worked with an actress who was more cooperative, less temperamental and a better workman, to use my term of highest compliment, than Barbara Stanwyck." (Cecil B. DeMille, on directing Stanwyck -- PR TNT's special, "Barbara Stanwyck: Fire and Desire" 1991)

"Career is too pompous a word. It was a job, and I have always felt privileged to be paid for doing what I love doing." (Barbara Stanwyck -- PR TNT's special, "Barbara Stanwyck: Fire and Desire" 1991)

Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Rex Cherryman. Actor. Died c. 1929.
husband:
Frank Fay. Comedian. Married on August 26, 1928; divorced in 1935.
companion:
Frank Capra. Director. Had relationship in early 1930s when they worked together on several films.
husband:
Robert Taylor. Actor. Married on May 14, 1939; divorced in 1951.
VIEW COMPLETE COMPANION LISTING

Family close complete family listing

mother:
Catherine Stevens. Killed c. 1911 when a drunken stranger pushed her off a moving streetcar.
father:
Byron Stevens. Bricklayer. Left five children c. 1911 after wife's death.
son:
Dion Anthony Fay. Adopted.

Bibliography close complete biography

"Barbara Stanwyck" Pyramid Books
"Starring Miss Barbara Stanwyck" Crown

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