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Sissy Spacek

Sissy Spacek

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: December 25, 1949 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Quitman, Texas, USA Profession: Cast ...
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"Sissy possesses that rare trait of not being impoverished with the process of remembering herself. Every role she plays, she is someone else. About six months after we inished shooting ["In the Bedroom"], we had dinner together at Sundance. I was in shock. I thought, 'Wait a minute! Where is Ruth? She doesn't walk this way or talk this way.' I was like some weird Sissy Spacek fan." --director Todd Field to USA Today, November 20, 2001.

"The films that belong to me, I'll do. The ones [that] don't, someone else will do. Films are like little rivers and creeks, just kind of floating along. You just have to know you'll find something sooner or later." --Sissy Spacek in Entertainment Weekly, November 16, 2001.

"Sissy's life was always more important than her career. Which is what I think people should aspire to. When she works, she works as hard as anybody I've ever seen. If she's not working, that's okay too." --"Crimes of the Heart" co-star and friend Jessica Lange, quoted in Entertainment Weekly, November 16, 2001.

"I've had people say to me on two separate occasions, 'Oh, I love you! You were great in 'The Exorcist!' And I was at a thrift shop once and someone said, 'We just loved your book, Mia!'" --Spacek answering the question "Have you ever been mistaken for another celebrity?" in Talk, Decemeber 2001/January 2002.

On meeting his future wife on the set of "Badlands", production designer Jack Fisk told Entertainment Weekly (November 16, 2001): "When she was a kid, Sissy's dad would call her Snooter ... because she would come to his office and go through all the drawers. I'd leave her things in the drawers [on the 'Badlands' set] that I thought had to do with her character. ... You didn't know that they were. They'd just get you thinking. It became a wonderful collaboration."

"I've actually lived a very, I don't want to say ordinary life, this is very far from ordinary. But I've raised a family and I have probably a lot of the same interests that other women of my generation have." --Sissy Spacek quoted in The Chicago Sun-Times, April 1, 2001.

Asked about the difficulty of finding good roles, Spacek told Susan King of the Los Angeles Times (October 21, 2000): "I don't think it's ever been easy. I kind of came up through low-budget films in the '70s -- kind of the art-house fare. So for me the hardest thing has always been to find the roles that I really thought were right for me. Cable certainly has opened up more things. There is just more to pick from now."

"There was a time when I was very driven but when I had my girls, I lost all my ambition. Now my ambitions are more of a spiritual nature. Just trying to figure it all out." --Sissy Spacek to London's The Evening Standard, December 2, 1999.

"... the film's richest performance belongs to Sissy Spacek as Alvin's "simple" daughter Rose who, with her speech impediment and habit of building bird-houses, initially seems like a refugee from the Lynch carnival but gains in gravity with every scene." --From the Sight and Sound review of "The Straight Story" by Kevin Jackson, December 1999.

About "Badlands" (1973): "I guess that's my favorite because it was my first major film. I met my husband, Jack, on the set. I still feel that 'Badlands' was the most extraordinary experience a human being should be allowed. If I never made another movie again after that one, I would have been happy." --quoted in The Chicago Sun-Times, January 31, 1999.

"Early in my career, Jack Lemmon actually had to take me on the side one day and say, 'You know Sissy, you gotta trust yourself.' I was in a phase where I would get to the set early in the morning and agonize over one line. Lemmon said, 'You have to come to terms witht the fact that the scene is either gonna work of not.'

"I guess I suffered from 'The Impostor Syndrome,' where you think at any point they're gonna find you out. I thought they would find out that I didn't have a lick of talent, It sounds awful, but I found this to be quite motivating. It made me work so much harder." --Spacek quoted in The Chicago Sun-Times, January 31, 1999.

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