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Eleanor Boardman

Eleanor Boardman

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Also Known As: Died: December 12, 1991
Born: August 19, 1898 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

:
Landed a secondary role in "The National Anthem", a play written by J. Hartley Manners for his wife, actress Laurette Taylor; lost her voice during out-of-town tryouts and had to be replaced
:
Gained national recognition as the 'Kodak Girl' on Eastman Kodak's advertising posters
1918:
Appeared on Broadway with Edna Hibbard, Louise Dresser and Frank Morgan in "Rockabye, Baby"
1922:
Brought to Hollywood by Samuel Goldwyn
1922:
Made feature film debut in "The Stranger's Banquet"
1923:
Acted in several early films for Goldwyn Pictures, including "Day of Faith" and "Gimme"
1923:
Played first leading role, as Remember Steddon, in "Souls for Sale"
1924:
Contract with Goldwyn assumed by newly consolidated company, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
1928:
Played what is her best remembered role, as the wife of an office clerk (James Murray) in King Vidor's "The Crowd"
1929:
Appeared in a part-talkie, "She Goes to War"
1930:
Made full-fledged talking film debut in "Mamba"
1931:
Acted in best remembered sound film, Cecil B. DeMille's remake of his 1914 silent success, "The Squaw Man"
1931:
Left MGM; effectively retired from the screen
1933:
Played small supporting role in independently-made, low-budget feature, "The Big Chance"
1934:
Made another one-shot (and final) return to film, in husband Harry d'Arrast's "The Three-Cornered Hat", shot independently in Spain
1979:
Appeared in Kevin Brownlow and David Gill's Thames TV documentary series about the silent movie era, "Hollywood"

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