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Eleanor Boardman

Eleanor Boardman

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Also Known As: Died: December 12, 1991
Born: August 19, 1898 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Profession: actor, model, fashion correspondent

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Charming, gentle-featured leading actress of the silent screen. A former model and 'Kodak Girl', Boardman typically played well-bred flappers or troubled heroines in "women's pictures," though she was able to surpass star glamour and add a note of sympathetic ordinariness to her screen roles. Joining MGM upon its consolidation in 1924, Boardman was one of the new studio's first stars, and one of its busiest, starring in 11 films during her first two years with the studio. A number of her films, including "Wine of Youth" (1924), the pleasing comedy "Proud Flesh" (1925) and the lavish swashbuckler "Bardelys the Magnificent" (1926), costarring John Gilbert, were directed by King Vidor, whose second wife she would become in 1926. Vidor also helmed Boardman's best-remembered film, "The Crowd" (1928), a remarkable study of an urban Everyman. While critics who generally pictured her in roles on a higher social plane thought her miscast in "The Crowd", Boardman achieved a performance of great subtlety that ranks among the finest in the history of silent screen acting. Unfortunately, her career in sound films, hurt by a series of either poor or unpopular films, quickly waned and she retired to marry director...

Charming, gentle-featured leading actress of the silent screen. A former model and 'Kodak Girl', Boardman typically played well-bred flappers or troubled heroines in "women's pictures," though she was able to surpass star glamour and add a note of sympathetic ordinariness to her screen roles. Joining MGM upon its consolidation in 1924, Boardman was one of the new studio's first stars, and one of its busiest, starring in 11 films during her first two years with the studio.

A number of her films, including "Wine of Youth" (1924), the pleasing comedy "Proud Flesh" (1925) and the lavish swashbuckler "Bardelys the Magnificent" (1926), costarring John Gilbert, were directed by King Vidor, whose second wife she would become in 1926. Vidor also helmed Boardman's best-remembered film, "The Crowd" (1928), a remarkable study of an urban Everyman. While critics who generally pictured her in roles on a higher social plane thought her miscast in "The Crowd", Boardman achieved a performance of great subtlety that ranks among the finest in the history of silent screen acting. Unfortunately, her career in sound films, hurt by a series of either poor or unpopular films, quickly waned and she retired to marry director Harry d'Abbadie d'Arrast.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 MGM: When the Lion Roars (1992) (Archival Footage)
3.
 The Big Chance (1933) Singer
4.
 The Flood (1931) Joan Marshall
5.
 The Great Meadow (1931) Diony Hall
6.
 Women Love Once (1931) Helen Fields
7.
 The Squaw Man (1931) Lady Diana
8.
 Mamba (1930) Helen von Linden
9.
 Redemption (1930) Lisa
10.
 She Goes to War (1929) Joan
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Landed a secondary role in "The National Anthem", a play written by J. Hartley Manners for his wife, actress Laurette Taylor; lost her voice during out-of-town tryouts and had to be replaced
:
Gained national recognition as the 'Kodak Girl' on Eastman Kodak's advertising posters
1918:
Appeared on Broadway with Edna Hibbard, Louise Dresser and Frank Morgan in "Rockabye, Baby"
1922:
Brought to Hollywood by Samuel Goldwyn
1922:
Made feature film debut in "The Stranger's Banquet"
1923:
Acted in several early films for Goldwyn Pictures, including "Day of Faith" and "Gimme"
1923:
Played first leading role, as Remember Steddon, in "Souls for Sale"
1924:
Contract with Goldwyn assumed by newly consolidated company, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
1928:
Played what is her best remembered role, as the wife of an office clerk (James Murray) in King Vidor's "The Crowd"
1929:
Appeared in a part-talkie, "She Goes to War"
1930:
Made full-fledged talking film debut in "Mamba"
1931:
Acted in best remembered sound film, Cecil B. DeMille's remake of his 1914 silent success, "The Squaw Man"
1931:
Left MGM; effectively retired from the screen
1933:
Played small supporting role in independently-made, low-budget feature, "The Big Chance"
1934:
Made another one-shot (and final) return to film, in husband Harry d'Arrast's "The Three-Cornered Hat", shot independently in Spain
1979:
Appeared in Kevin Brownlow and David Gill's Thames TV documentary series about the silent movie era, "Hollywood"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Germantown High School: Germantown , Pennsylvania -
Academy of Fine Arts: -
Academy of Fine Arts: -

Companions close complete companion listing

husband:
King Vidor. Director. Born on February 8, 1894; married on September 8, 1926; wedding was almost a dual ceremony with Greta Garbo and John Gilbert, but Garbo changed her mind at the last second and never showed up; divorced c. 1931; engaged in custody dispute over two daughters; died on November 1, 1982.
husband:
Harry d'Abbadie d'Arrast. Director. Married in 1940; separated in late 1930s; divorced c. 1946; born in 1897 in Argentina; died on March 17, 1968.

Family close complete family listing

daughter:
Antonia Vidor. Born in November 1928; father King Vidor and Boardman planned name 'Boardman Vidor' if child were a boy; when daughter was born they had no name chosen; went nameless for several months, though 'Joyce' was tried briefly.
daughter:
Belinda Vidor. Born in the summer of 1930; father, King Vidor.
step-daughter:
Suzanne Parry.

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