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Alan Alda

Alan Alda

  • Extraordinary Seaman, The (1969) May 19 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
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Also Known As: Died:
Born: January 28, 1936 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: New York City, New York, USA Profession: Cast ...
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1951:
Performed Abbott-and-Costello-style comic sketches with his father at the Hollywood Canteen
1953:
Made theatrical debut at age 17, starring in "Charley's Aunt" in summer stock in Barnesville, PA
1955:
While in Europe studying abroad, performed with father on stage in the Rome production of "Room Service"
1956:
Made New York stage debut as an understudy in "The Hot Corner"
1961:
Co-starred in "Purlie Victorious" on Broadway
1963:
Film acting debut in "Gone Are the Days"; repeating his role from the Broadway production "Purlie Victorious"
1963:
Appeared in the Broadway play "Fair Game for Lovers"
1964:
First leading role on Broadway in "The Owl and the Pussycat"
1964:
Cast as a series regular on the NBC political and social satire program "That Was the Week That Was"
1967:
Starred in the Broadway musical "The Apple Tree"; earned a Tony Award nomination
1968:
Portrayed George Plimpton in the biopic "Paper Lion"
1972:
TV-movie debut in "The Glass House" (ABC)
1972:
Breakthrough role of Capt. Benjamin Franklin 'Hawkeye' Pierce in the TV adaptation of the 1970 film "M*A*S*H" (CBS); wrote 13 episodes and directed 32, including the show's 1983 two-and-a-half hour series finale "Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen"; earned 25 Emmy nominations for acting, writing and directing and 11 Golden Globe nominations
1974:
Co-directed and co-starred (with Carol Burnett) in the TV adaptation of the Broadway comedy "6 Rms Riv Vu" (CBS); earned an Emmy nomination for Best Actor
1975:
Created and wrote pilot for the CBS sitcom "We'll Get By"; also executive produced
1977:
Portrayed convicted killer Caryl Chessman in the NBC TV-movie "Kill Me If You Can"; earned an Emmy nomination
1978:
Teamed with Ellen Burstyn in Robert Mulligan's feature adaptation of "Same Time, Next Year"
1979:
Feature screenwriting debut, "The Seduction of Joe Tynan"; also starred as the titular politician
1981:
Feature directing debut (also scripted) the ensemble "The Four Seasons"; again collaborated with Burnett who played his onscreen spouse
1984:
Executive produced the short-lived CBS sitcom "The Four Seasons" based film; also appeared in pilot
1986:
Directed and wrote second film, "Sweet Liberty"
1988:
Helmed third film (also wrote and starred), "A New Life"
1989:
Received critical acclaim for the role of an egotistical director in Woody Allen's "Crimes and Misdemeanors"
1990:
Wrote and directed "Betsey's Wedding"; also co-starred
1991:
Made London stage debut as the Stage Manager in Thornton Wilder's "Our Town"
1992:
Returned to Broadway as star of Neil Simon's play "Jake's Women"
1993:
Portrayed scientist Robert Gallo in the acclaimed TV-movie "And the Band Played On" (HBO); received Emmy nomination
1993:
Hosted the PBS series "Scientific American Frontiers"
1993:
Teamed again with Woody Allen for "Manhattan Murder Mystery"
1994:
Offered an uncharacteristically nasty turn in the based-on-fact drama "White Mile" (HBO)
1996:
Reprised stage role in CBS TV adaptation of "Neil Simon's 'Jake's Women'"
1996:
Made third film with Woody Allen, the romantic musical comedy "Everyone Says I Love You"
1997:
Appeared in Costa-Gavras' "Mad City" opposite Dustin Hoffman and John Travolta
1998:
Played Jennifer Aniston's brother-in-law in "The Object of My Affection"
1998:
Returned to Broadway, co-starring with Alfred Molina and Victor Garber in "Art"
1999:
Had a recurring role on NBC's "ER" as a prominent surgeon in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease; earned an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Guest Actor
2001:
Played lead role of physicist Richard Feynman in the L.A. stage production of "Q.E.D."; reprised role in NYC
2001:
Received 30th career Emmy nomination for the Showtime movie "Club Land"
2001:
Portrayed defense attorney Ernie Goodman in the Showtime original movie "The Killing Yard"
2004:
Cast as Senator Ralph Owen Brewster in Martin Scorsese's "The Aviator" based on the life of legendary director and aviator Howard Hughes; earned an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor
2004:
Joined the cast of NBC's White House drama "The West Wing" playing a Republican from California with presidential aspirations; earned Emmy (2005) and SAG (2006) nominations for Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series
2005:
Starred in Joe Mantello's revival of David Mamet's play "Glengarry Glen Ross"; earned a Tony nomination for his role
2005:
Published his memoir <i>Never Have Your Dog Stuffed: And Other Things I've Learned</i>
2007:
Co-starred in the boxing film "Resurrecting the Champ"
2009:
Earned an Emmy nomination for his guest starring role on NBC's "30 Rock" as Milton Greene, Jack's biological father
2011:
Guest starred on Showtime's "The Big C"
2011:
Teamed with Ben Stiller and Eddie Murphy in the ensemble comedy "Tower Heist"
2012:
Re-teamed with "The Object of My Affection" co-stars Jennifer Aniston and Paul Rudd in "Wanderlust"

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