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Arthur Seid

Arthur Seid

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession: Editing ...
RATE AND COMMENT

COMPLETE FILMOGRAPHY WITH SYNOPSIS

Editing (feature film)

1.
Stop! Look! and Laugh! (1960) as Film ed various segments
Ventriloquist Paul Winchell tells his dummies the world's history, as interpreted by The Three Stooges.
2.
Force of Evil (1949) as Film Editor
A crooked lawyer tries to protect his numbers running brother from a ruthless crime boss.
3.
Here Comes Trouble (1948) as Film Editor
A newspaper publisher and his ace reporter try to solve the murder of a blackmailing stripper.
4.
Who Killed Doc Robbin (1948) as Film Editor
5.
The Unknown (1946) as Film Editor
A woman hires two detectives to keep her alive long enough to claim her inheritance.
6.
Throw a Saddle on a Star (1946) as Film Editor
7.
Underground Agent (1942) as Film Editor
8.
Boston Blackie Goes Hollywood (1942) as Film Editor
When he's framed for robbery, a reformed thief takes off to find the real culprit.
9.
Hello Annapolis (1942) as Film Editor
10.
The Man Who Returned to Life (1942) as Film Editor
David Jamieson (John Howard), a Northerner, is forced to flee from a Maryland town where he is suspected of murdering the girl who attempted to force him to marry her on the eve of his wedding to another girl. He flees and assumes a new identity but returns to save the life of the man accused of killing him.
11.
Lucky Legs (1942) as Film Editor
12.
Prairie Gunsmoke (1942) as Film Editor
To win possession of the ranches he holds mortgages on, crooked banker Jim Kelton (Tristram Coffin) has his henchmen led by Spike Allen (Joe McGuinn) raid the ranches and stampede the cattle herds thereby ensuring the ranchers can't meet their notes. U. S. Marshal Wild Bill Hickok (Bill Elliott) arrives and is immediately distrusted by Tex Terrell (Tex Ritter) because of Hickok's policy of enforcing the letter of the law. But when Hickok rescues rancher Henry Wade (Hal Price) and his daughter Lucy (Virginia Carroll) from the Kelton gang, Tex joins with Hickok to use the law against Kelton.
13.
Outlaws of the Panhandle (1941) as Film Editor
14.
Time Out for Rhythm (1941) as Film Editor
The producers of a musical each hire different women to star.
15.
Harmon of Michigan (1941) as Film Editor
Tom Harmon (ol' # 98 for the Michigan Wolverines, husband of actress Elyse Knox and father of Mark Harmon and Kelly Harmon)took a back seat to no one on the football field (except the Minnesota Gophers) or, later, in the broadcast booth, but, on film, he managed to find himself in two of the all-time bad sports movies..."The Spirit of West Point" and "Harmon of Michigan." The latter, if it had been a true-life biography of Tom Harmon, might have made a passable film but after a short prologue, narrated by sports writer Bill Henry who is not the same as actor William Henry, that semi-recaps Harmon's football-playing days at the University of Michigan, it quickly develops into a mess that indicates the director and writers used the technical adviser, Coach Jeff Cravath, only to put plays on the blackboard. Once Harmon,(supposedly playing himself but the character he plays here has more character flaws than the law allows), graduates from Michigan, he marries his college sweetheart Peggy Adams (Anita Louise), turns up his nose at the prospect of playing professional football---a poor-paying and not-that-well respected job in 1941---and starts a vagabond tour of coaching tank-water colleges. Authenicity went out the window when the narration ended, as did any kind of time tracking, as everything that follows seems to happen in a single football season. Tom takes an assistant coach job at a cow-pasture college under Jimmy Wayburn (William Hall) and lasts one day before Wayburn fires him. Then he signs to play for a College All-Star team doing exhibition games against pro teams, but his team-mates, hacked because Tom gets star billing, lay down on him and he gets smacked down hard on every play. One of the leaders willing to let Harmon get slaughtered is old Michigan teammate Forrest Evashevski (playing himself), a life-long friend in real life and Godfather to Mark Harmon and a long-time respected coach at the University of Iowa. Harmon wins the game by himself, but decides this isn't his cup of tea. He hangs around the house a few weeks, then gets a job as an assistant under old-time coach Pop Branch at a college that has three buidings on campus and a football stadium seating 100,000 fans. He helps Pop win a few games (still ticking along in what appears to be the same fall football season), but the alumni at Webster College are tired of losing, fire their coach and hire Harmon away from Pop. Harmon takes over the Webster team in mid-season and becomes the all-time example of a hard-ass coach willing to win at any cost, including installing a screen-pass play that depends on an illegal blcoking scheme---the Flying Wedge---to make it work. His Webster team begins to thump their opponents by large scores, usually leaving the other team battered and bloodied by the use of the illegal blocking scheme. They win four or five games which, based on the writers time scheme, would have them playing 20 games a season in what was then a nine-and-ten game season. Plus, the press and other coaches around and about, are up in arms about Harmon's tatics, but the jerks refereeing the games evidently haven't read the rule book nor the newspapers and throw no penalty flags against his team. Well, one referee does once, but he never officiated nor had lunch in that town again. It, by any reasonable calendar must now be July of the next year in a season that should have ended in December, and hard-case Harmon's team is going up against Pop's team (where Harmon coached earlier in this never-ending season) and Pop drops by and tells Tom he ain't all that fond of Tom's coaching methods, but Tom poo-pahs him off, and then sends his team out and they gleefully dismantle Pop's fair-playing team by 109-0. But Webster's quarterback Freddie Davis (Stanley Brown) suffers a concussion running a play Harmon calls just to run up the score even higher---Harmon evidently didn't read the script because nobody using their own name would want this character perceived
16.
Tillie the Toiler (1941) as Film Editor
17.
Two Latins from Manhattan (1941) as Film Editor
18.
Sing for Your Supper (1941) as Film Editor
19.
Thundering Frontier (1940) as Film Editor

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