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George Segal

George Segal

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: February 13, 1934 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Great Neck, New York, USA Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

1947:
Moved to Manhattan with mother after death of father
:
Organized group, "Bruno Lynch and His Imperial Jazz Band", with which he performed as a banjo player and singer throughout high school and while attending Columbia
:
Worked as janitor and usher at Circle in the Square Theater, New York; understudied in "La Ronde" but never went on
1955:
Stage acting debut (with Peter Falk) in Moliere's "Don Juan" at NYC's Downtown Theatre; closed after one night
1956:
Appeared in legendary Circle in the Square stage production of Eugene O'Neill's "The Iceman Cometh", which launched the career of Jason Robards Jr.
:
Drafted into the USA Army
:
After military service, landed a role in the New York Shakespeare Festival's "Antony and Cleopatra" and the Off-Broadway revival of Jerome Kern's "Leave It to Jane"; also formed a nightclub singing act with Patricia Scott
1960:
First association with Buck Henry, "The Premise", an Off-Broadway improvisational revue in the style of Chicago's Second City troupe; left to perform in Paddy Chayevsky's "Gideon" on Broadway in 1961
1961:
Screen debut in "The Young Doctors"
:
Signed non-exclusive, long-term contract with Columbia Pictures
1963:
Reteamed with Robards in "Act One", film adaptation of Moss Hart's autobiography; had small role as Lester Sweyd
1963:
Acted in "Man Without a Skin" episode of "Naked City" (ABC)
1963:
Returned to Broadway in "Rattle of a Simple Man"
1964:
First significant film role in "Invitation to a Gunfighter", produced by Stanley Kramer
1964:
Appeared in NYC stage production of "The Knack", directed by Mike Nichols
1965:
Drew attention as a distraught newlywed in Kramer's superb "Ship of Fools"
1965:
First starring film role, "King Rat"
1966:
Played Biff to Lee J. Cobb's Willy Loman in "Death of a Salesman" (CBS)
1966:
Earned Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actor as the ambitious young professor in the Nichols-directed "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?", adapted by Ernest Lehman from Edward Albee's play
1966:
Portrayed American secret agent investigating neo-Nazi group in "The Quiller Memorandum", a unique spy pic scripted by playwright Harold Pinter from a novel by Elleston Trevor
1967:
First collaborations with director Ted Kotcheff, the ABC TV productions of "The Desperate Hours" (1967) and "Of Mice and Men" (1968)
1967:
Reunited with Robards in "The St. Valentine's Day Massacre"
1968:
Portrayed one of four Jewish intellectuals on their way to a friend's funeral in Sidney Lumet's "Bye Bye Braverman"
1968:
Was the cop on the trail of a flamboyent ladykiller (Rod Steiger) in "No Way to Treat a Lady"; received BAFTA nomination for Best Supporting Actor
1970:
Starred opposite Barbra Streisand in "The Owl and the Pussycat", adapted by Buck Henry from Bill Manoff's play
1970:
Starred in the cult classic "Where's Poppa?", directed by Carl Reiner
1973:
Played married man who embarks on an affair but falls in love with Glenda Jackson in "A Touch of Class"; Jackson took home her second Best Actress Oscar for her efforts
1973:
Portrayed the titular Stephen Blume in Paul Mazursky's "Blume in Love"
1975:
Essayed Sam Spade Jr in "The Black Bird", an atrocious takeoff on "The Maltese Falcon"; also executive produced
1977:
First feature with director Ted Kotcheff, "Fun with Dick and Jane"
1978:
Headlined Kotcheff's "Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe?"
1979:
Withdrew from the lead in Blake Edwards' "10"; sued by Edwards for breach of contract; paid the director a reported $270,000 to settle case
1979:
Reunited with Glenda Jackson for "Lost and Found"
1882:
Played a snowbound salesman in HBO's "The Deadly Game"
1983:
Starred as dogged NYC detective John Grafton in "Trackdown: Finding the Goodbar Killer" (CBS)
1984:
Spoofed the Sherwood Forest legend in "The Zany Adventures of Robin Hood" (CBS)
1985:
Returned to Broadway as John Lithgow's greedy fight manager in the short-lived "Requiem for a Heavyweight"
1987:
TV series debut as regular, "Take Five" (CBS)
1988:
Returned to series TV as disheviled insurance investigator Daedelus Patrick Murphy in "Murphy's Law" (ABC)
1989:
Portrayed Albert opposite Kirstie Alley in "Look Who's Talking"
1991:
Delivered funny, fluid performance as the liberal Jewish headwriter for Eddie Sparks (James Caan) in "For the Boys"
1993:
Reprised Albert for "Look Who's Talking Now"
1994:
Played Ann-Marget's love interest in the NBC movie "Following Her Heart"
:
Returned to regular TV series work in syndicated "High Tide", playing whiny retired CIA agent who employs two brothers (Rick Springfield and Yannick Bisson) in his Los Angleles-based detective agency
1996:
Provided voice of Dr. Benton Quest for animated "The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest", airing simultaneously on TNT, TBS and the Cartoon Network
1996:
With Mary Tyler Moore made a great neurotic Jewish couple in the hit comedy "Flirting With Disaster"; first association with Tea Leoni
1996:
Reteamed with Streisand (who directed as well as starred) for "The Mirror Has Two Faces"
1997:
Portrayed recurring character of Nora's father on the NBC sitcom "The Naked Truth", starring Tea Leoni as Nora and Mary Tyler Moore as his wife
1997:
Starred as magazine publisher-owner Jack Gallo in the NBC sitcom "Just Shoot Me"
1998:
Played Harry Houdini's manager Martin Beck in the TNT original presentation "Houdini"
1999:
Starred opposite Buck Henry and Wayne Knight in Broadway's long-running, Tony-winning "Art"; the three had previously been in the cast of 1994's "To Die For" (which Henry also scripted) but had no scenes together
2001:
Made London stage debut in "Art", alongside Paul Freeman and Richard Griffiths
2005:
Co-starred with Glenn Close, Elizabeth Banks and James Marsden in "Heights" a drama following five New Yorkers over a 24-hour period

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