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Terence Blanchard

Terence Blanchard

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: March 13, 1962 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA Profession: composer, musician

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Acclaimed as one of the foremost contemporary jazz trumpeters, Terence Blanchard has developed a secondary career scoring features, many of them directed by Spike Lee. The New Orleans-born Blanchard developed a love for music early and began studying piano at the age of five. He later switched to the trumpet and subsequently enrolled at the New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts (NOCCA), where he studied with Ellis Marsalis and George Jenson. While at Rutgers, Blanchard continued his music studies with Kenny Barron, Paul Jeffries and Bill Fielder. During his sophomore year, he was invited to join Lionel Hampton's orchestra and he left school to tour for nearly two years. In 1982, Blanchard and saxophone player Donald Harrison were selected to replace Wynton and Branford Marsalis by Art Blakey for his Jazz Messengers. Blanchard began composing and his work was included not only on Blakey's "New York Scene" album but also on two albums recorded with Harrison. After four years with Blakey, Blanchard and Harrison left to form their own jazz quintet. Film director Spike Lee tapped Blanchard and Harrison to play with the Natural Spiritual Orchestra on the soundtrack for "School Daze" (1988). The pair...

Acclaimed as one of the foremost contemporary jazz trumpeters, Terence Blanchard has developed a secondary career scoring features, many of them directed by Spike Lee.

The New Orleans-born Blanchard developed a love for music early and began studying piano at the age of five. He later switched to the trumpet and subsequently enrolled at the New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts (NOCCA), where he studied with Ellis Marsalis and George Jenson. While at Rutgers, Blanchard continued his music studies with Kenny Barron, Paul Jeffries and Bill Fielder. During his sophomore year, he was invited to join Lionel Hampton's orchestra and he left school to tour for nearly two years. In 1982, Blanchard and saxophone player Donald Harrison were selected to replace Wynton and Branford Marsalis by Art Blakey for his Jazz Messengers. Blanchard began composing and his work was included not only on Blakey's "New York Scene" album but also on two albums recorded with Harrison. After four years with Blakey, Blanchard and Harrison left to form their own jazz quintet.

Film director Spike Lee tapped Blanchard and Harrison to play with the Natural Spiritual Orchestra on the soundtrack for "School Daze" (1988). The pair were invited by Bill Lee to perform on the soundtrack to "Do the Right Thing" (1989). Around this time, however, Blanchard began experiencing problems. In his own words, "I thought I was using too much pressure when I played. Later I found that my problem was in my embouchure . . . since childhood, I had been playing incorrectly with my bottom lip over my bottom teeth, which often caused me to cut my lip." Recognizing that he needed to correct the problem in order to further grow as a performer, the trumpet player severed his partnership with Harrison and began to re-learn how to play the trumpet.

When Spike Lee approached Blanchard about working on his next film about a jazz musician (1990's "Mo' Better Blues"), the musician was prepared. He had formed a new quintet and was under new management. Agreeing to work with Lee, Blanchard served as technical advisor, coaching Denzel Washington and dubbing Washington's trumpet playing. Lee had liked one of the themes the musician had created and invited Blanchard to try his hand at composing the score for "Jungle Fever" (1991). The jazz-inflected score was the first of several collaborations between Lee and Blanchard. Many critics took note of the composer's lush, beautifully orchestrated score for Lee's "Malcolm X" (1992). Capturing the tenor of the film's four-decade span, the music encapsulated the pleasures as well as the pain of the African-American experience providing an emotional context for the film's events. (Blanchard, who appeared in the film as a trumpet player, recorded a variation of the score, "The Malcolm X Jazz Suite", which also earned widespread acclaim.) He subsequently provided the appropriate music for Lee's "Crooklyn" (1994), "Clockers" (1995) and "Get on the Bus" (1996). In addition to his work with Lee, Blanchard has also provided the jazz scores for "Sugar Hill" and Matty Rich's "The Inkwell" (both 1994), and contributed music to "'Til There Was You" (1997).

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Just Wright (2010)
2.
 Icons Among Us (2009)
3.
 Waist Deep (2006)
4.
 She Hate Me (2004)
5.
 Dark Blue (2003)
6.
 25th Hour (2002)
7.
 Salton Sea, The (2002)
8.
 Barbershop (2002)
9.
 Original Sin (2001)
10.
 Bamboozled (2000)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1967:
Began music studies as a piano student
1976:
Began playing the trumpet
1978:
Enrolled at the New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts (NOCCA)
1980:
Went on tour with Lionel Hampton and his orchestra
1982:
Replaced Wynton Marsalis as trumpet player with Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers; remained with group for four years
:
Formed own jazz combo with Donald Harrison
:
Took time off from performing to perfect his embrouchure
1988:
First screen collaboration with Spike Lee, played trumpet with the National Spiritual Orchestra for "School Daze"
1990:
Formed Terence Blanchard Quintet
1990:
Wrote song, performed score and served as artistic consultant on Lee's "Mo' Better Blues"
1991:
First original film score, "Jungle Fever", directed by Lee
1992:
Feature debut, appeared as a trumpet player in Billie Holliday's band in Lee's "Malcolm X"; also composed the film's original score
1994:
Scored first non-Lee directed feature, "Sugar Hill"
1994:
Wrote the music for the TV-movie "Assault at West Point" (Showtime)
1995:
Scored "Crooklyn", directed by Lee
1996:
Wrote original music for Lee's "Get on the Bus"
2000:
Scored Lee's controversial "Bamboozled"
2001:
Wrote the superb musical underscore for "The Caveman's Valentine"
2002:
Scored "25th Hour". directed by Spike Lee; received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Original Score.
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Education

Rutgers University: Rutgers , New Jersey -
New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts: New Orleans , Louisiana -

Notes

"Next to my father, Terence had the most impact on how we captured the music on screen [in 'Mo' Better Blues']. Because of his involvement, I'm sure we did it . . . with the utmost integrity." --Spike Lee

"Terence is still thought of in Hollywood as a jazz musician who can only write jazz scores. His employment opportunities with some directors have narrowed because Spike Lee has ruffled some feathers among the Hollywood flock. Still Terence takes it in stride.

'The difficulties I'm dealing with are shared by all cinema scorers. For decades, Elmer BErnstein was thought of as a comedy composer, something that's happening to Miles Goodman right now. I mean, they look to John Williams for blockbuster scores in spite of the tender ethnic theme he wrote for 'Schindler's List'. Besides, I have my band which I cn go out and tour with." --From "Terence Blanchard: The Heart Speaks" by Bob Hershon, JAZZ NOW, July 1996 (Volume 6, No.3)

Family close complete family listing

father:
Joseph Oliver Blanchard. Hotel worker.
father:
Joseph Oliver Blanchard. Had two; survived him.
daughter:
Olivia Ray Blanchard. Born c. 1991.
daughter:
Olivia Ray Blanchard. Had two who survived him.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

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