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Ettore Scola

Ettore Scola

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Also Known As: Died: January 19, 2016
Born: May 10, 1931 Cause of Death: Undisclosed illness
Birth Place: Trevico, , IT Profession: director, screenwriter, journalist

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Ettore Scola was an Italian filmmaker who wrote and directed over forty movies throughout his fifty-plus year career. Born and raised in the Southern Italian town of Trevico, Scola got his start in show business in his early teens when he began ghostwriting jokes for a prominent Italian comic named Toto. His work for the comic was funny enough that by his early 20s, Scola was making a good living writing comedy screenplays for various Italian movie studios. Despite having a successful screenwriting career, however, Scola longed to direct his own films. He had his chance in 1964 when co-wrote and directed "Let's Talk About Women." The film was a minor success, which allowed Scola to write and direct several more films throughout the 1960s and early 1970s. His first major hit came in 1974 with the comedy-drama "We All Loved Each Other So Much." The film won two Italian Golden Globes and was nominated for several more, thus distinguishing Scola as one of Italy's most acclaimed directors. Scola continued directing films at a breakneck speed over the next few decades, with films like "The Night In Varennes" (1982), "What Time Is It?" (1989), and "The Dinner" (1998), all receiving wide acclaim. Scola's...

Ettore Scola was an Italian filmmaker who wrote and directed over forty movies throughout his fifty-plus year career. Born and raised in the Southern Italian town of Trevico, Scola got his start in show business in his early teens when he began ghostwriting jokes for a prominent Italian comic named Toto. His work for the comic was funny enough that by his early 20s, Scola was making a good living writing comedy screenplays for various Italian movie studios. Despite having a successful screenwriting career, however, Scola longed to direct his own films. He had his chance in 1964 when co-wrote and directed "Let's Talk About Women." The film was a minor success, which allowed Scola to write and direct several more films throughout the 1960s and early 1970s. His first major hit came in 1974 with the comedy-drama "We All Loved Each Other So Much." The film won two Italian Golden Globes and was nominated for several more, thus distinguishing Scola as one of Italy's most acclaimed directors. Scola continued directing films at a breakneck speed over the next few decades, with films like "The Night In Varennes" (1982), "What Time Is It?" (1989), and "The Dinner" (1998), all receiving wide acclaim. Scola's directing career slowed down in the 2000s, with a 10-year gap between 2003's "People of Rome" and his final film, 2013's "How Strange to Be Named Federico." With a prolific career spanning seven decades and dozens of films, Scola died peacefully on January 19, 2016 in Rome. He was 84.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

2.
3.
  Unfair Competition (2001) Director
4.
  Dinner, The (1999) Director
5.
6.
  Mario, Maria e Mario (1993) Director
8.
  What Time Is It? (1989) Director
9.
  Splendor (1988) Director
10.
  Famiglia, La (1987) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Voi Siete Qui (2011)
3.
4.
 Fellini (2001) Himself
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Milestones close milestones

:
Began contributing illustrations and articles to satirical magazines at age 16
1948:
Began writing gags for radio
1952:
First screenwriting credit on "Canzoni de Mezzo Secola"
1964:
Directorial debut, "Let's Talk About Women"
1970:
Helmed "The Pizza Triangle"
1975:
Garnered international attention with "C'Eravamo Tanto Amati/We All Loved One Another So Much"
1977:
Wrote and directed the Oscar-nominated Best Foreign-Language Film "A Special Day/Una Giornata particolare"
1981:
Helmed and scripted the period romance "Passione d'Amore"
1982:
Directed and wrote the speculative historical drama "La Nuit de Varennes"
1984:
"Le Bal", a historical drama told without dialogue, screened at Berlin Film Festival where it won the Best Director prize
1987:
Second Academy Award nominated Best Foreign-Language Film, "The Family"
1991:
Directed "Captain Fracassa's Journey"
1993:
Wrote and directed the triangular romance "Mario, Maria and Mario"
1996:
Was screenwriter and director on "The Dinner"
2001:
Helmed and scripted the historical drama "Unfair Competition"
2013:
Co-wrote and directed his final film "How Strange to Be Named Federico"
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Education

University of Jurisprudence: -

Family close complete family listing

daughter:
Paola Scola. Assistant director.

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