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Joel Schumacher

Joel Schumacher

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St. Elmo's Fire DVD "St. Elmo's Fire" (1985) follows seven friends that are attempting to figure out... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

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Also Known As: Joel T. Schumacher Died:
Born: August 29, 1939 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: New York City, New York, USA Profession: director, screenwriter, costume designer, retail salesperson, window dresser, fashion designer, shopkeeper

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Using his past experience as a window display artist and costume designer, director Joel Schumacher developed into a purveyor of slickly produced film entertainment that was more often than not a triumph of style over substance. He was also one of the few directors with an uncanny knack for discovering and casting unknown actors who would later become stars, including Corey Haim, Colin Farrell, Gerard Butler and Matthew McConaughey to name a few. After helming such forgettable movies as "The Incredible Shrinking Woman" (1981) and "D.C. Cab" (1983), Schumacher scored his first financial hit with the Brat Pack-led "St. Elmo's Fire" (1985). But it was the lasting success of the iconic horror comedy "The Lost Boys" (1987), which made stars out of the "two Coreys" and Kiefer Sutherland while earning new generations of fans over time, that put him on the map for posterity. Following the underwhelming "Flatliners" (1990), Schumacher directed perhaps his most compelling movie, the vigilante thriller "Falling Down" (1993), before venturing into blockbuster territory with the campy, but well-received "Batman Forever" (1995). Only two years later, Schumacher became a Hollywood punchline with "Batman & Robin"...

Using his past experience as a window display artist and costume designer, director Joel Schumacher developed into a purveyor of slickly produced film entertainment that was more often than not a triumph of style over substance. He was also one of the few directors with an uncanny knack for discovering and casting unknown actors who would later become stars, including Corey Haim, Colin Farrell, Gerard Butler and Matthew McConaughey to name a few. After helming such forgettable movies as "The Incredible Shrinking Woman" (1981) and "D.C. Cab" (1983), Schumacher scored his first financial hit with the Brat Pack-led "St. Elmo's Fire" (1985). But it was the lasting success of the iconic horror comedy "The Lost Boys" (1987), which made stars out of the "two Coreys" and Kiefer Sutherland while earning new generations of fans over time, that put him on the map for posterity. Following the underwhelming "Flatliners" (1990), Schumacher directed perhaps his most compelling movie, the vigilante thriller "Falling Down" (1993), before venturing into blockbuster territory with the campy, but well-received "Batman Forever" (1995). Only two years later, Schumacher became a Hollywood punchline with "Batman & Robin" (1997), an unholy mess of a movie that featured close-up shots of cod pieces and protruding nipples on George Clooney's Batsuit, which almost permanently sank the franchise. He restored a degree of respectability with "Tigerland" (2000) and "Veronica Guerin" (2003), only to take a step back with a wildly flamboyant adaptation of "The Phantom of the Opera" (2004). Though often derided for lacking substance, there was no doubt that Schumacher had etched a distinctive filmmaking style throughout his often bumpy career.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Twelve (2010)
2.
  Creek (2010)
3.
4.
5.
  Veronica Guerin (2003) Director
6.
  Phone Booth (2002) Director
7.
  Bad Company (2002) Director
8.
  Tigerland (2000) Director
9.
  Flawless (1999) Director
10.
  8mm (1999) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Side by Side (2012)
3.
 Heckler (2008)
4.
 Intimate Portrait: Liz Smith (2001) Interviewee
5.
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Worked as design and display artist for Henri Bendel's department store in NYC
:
Attended the Parsons School of Design on scholarship
1971:
Talked his way into a trial job as costume designer on Frank Perry's "Play It As It Lays"
:
Moved to Los Angeles
1973:
Worked as costume designer on "The Last of Sheila" and "Sleeper"
1974:
First TV credit as a production designer, Curtis Harrington's TV-movie, "Killer Bees"
1974:
TV-movie co-writing and directing debut, "The Virginia Hill Story"
1976:
First feature as screenwriter, "Sparkle"
1978:
Penned the feature adaptation of the stage play "The Wiz"
1981:
Directed first feature film, "The Incredible Shrinking Woman"
1983:
First TV credit as executive producer, the unsold CBS pilot, "Now We're Cookin'"; also wrote the screenplay
1983:
Directed Mr. T in the comedy "D.C. Cab"
1985:
Executive produced the short-lived NBC series "Code Name: Foxfire"
1985:
Directed an ensemble cast in the coming-of-age film "St. Elmo's Fire"
1987:
Helmed the vampire thriller "The Lost Boys" starring Jason Patric, Corey Haim and Kiefer Sutherland
1989:
Directed "Cousins," a remake of a French film starring Ted Danson and Isabella Rossellini
1990:
First film on which he had final cut, "Flatliners," starring Julia Roberts and Kiefer Sutherland
1991:
Re-teamed with Julia Roberts to direct her in "Dying Young"
1993:
Directed the controversial hit "Falling Down," starring Michael Douglas
1994:
Helmed the feature adaptation of John Grisham's novel "The Client"
1995:
Chosen to replace Tim Burton as the director of the third installment of the Batman series "Batman Forever"
1996:
Directed his second feature adaptation of a Grisham novel "A Time to Kill"
1997:
Directed the fourth installment in the series "Batman & Robin," which was a critical disaster and essentially killed off the franchise
1999:
Directed and wrote the screenplay for "Flawless," starring Robert De Niro and Philip Seymour Hoffman
2000:
Helmed the acclaimed Vietnam-era drama "Tigerland," starring Colin Farrell in his first leading role
2002:
Returned to big-budget features with "Bad Company," starring Anthony Hopkins and Chris Rock
2003:
Re-teamed with Colin Farrell to direct him in "Phone Booth"
2003:
Helmed the biological drama "Veronica Guerin," starring Cate Blanchett as an Irish journalist who is assassinated by drug dealers
2004:
Directed the film version of Andrew Lloyd Webber's stage musical "The Phantom of the Opera"
2007:
Helmed the thriller "The Number 23," starring Jim Carrey
2009:
Helmed the horror film "Blood Creek"
2010:
Directed an ensemble cast, including Chace Crawford and Ellen Barkin, in the drama thriller "Twelve"
2011:
Directed Nicolas Cage and Nicole Kidman in the crime drama "Trespass"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University of California, Los Angeles: Los Angeles , California -
Fashion Institute of Technology: New York , New York -
Parsons The New School for Design: New York , New York -

Notes

When Mr. Schumacher approached her (actress Susan Sarandon who subsequently starred in "The Client") about starring in the thriller, he shot straight for the heart. During lunch at a packed restaurant in Ms. Sarandon's Chelsea neighborhood in New York, he had flowers sent to the table and then, to her astonishment, got down on the floor. "I just couldn't imagine making the movie without her," he says. "I thought, 'I've got to do something really dramatic.' So I took her hand and I proposed. I said, 'I can't live without you. Come and marry me on the screen for four months.'" --From The New York Times, July 17, 1994.

Sarandon was both embarrassed and charmed by Schumacher's public display of wretched excess. Yet as someone who covets candor in personal transactions, Sarandon was more beguiled by the rest of Schumacher's rap, which he says went something like this: "I've got a lot to learn as a director, but I can cast a movie better than anyone. You'll be cast well. You'll be treated with respect. And you'll have a lot of fun."--From "Why They All Want Susan" by Gene Seymour, New York Newsday: FANFARE, July 17, 1994.

"... The director's work has also been criticized for being more flashy than substantive. Asked about this, his voice drops. 'If you ask people to leave their homes, spend a lot of money on a movie, buy that terrible popcorn and those diluted sodas,' he said, 'you'd better tell them, a story and entertain them. There's absolutely nothing wrong about that.'"--From "Visual Flair, A Hip Sensibility And a Past" by Bernard Weinraub, Thew New York Times, June 11, 1995.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Frank Schumacher. Soda fountain worker. A Baptist from Knoxville, Tennessee; died when Schumacher was four years old.
mother:
Marian Schumacher. A Jew from Sweden; died suddenly in 1965 from diabetes complications.
godson:
Lucas Berman. Son of Bruce Berman, president of Worldwide Production at Warner Bros. Pictures, and his wife Nancy.

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