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Alan Rudolph

Alan Rudolph

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Also Known As: Alan Steven Rudolph Died:
Born: December 18, 1943 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Los Angeles, California, USA Profession: director, screenwriter, producer, actor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

The son of director Oscar Rudolph, writer-director Alan Rudolph followed in the footsteps of mentor Robert Altman, embracing a similar kind of ensemble picture while pursuing his own personal, less satiric, more human vision. Despised by mainstream Hollywood, he has managed to stay true to his idiosyncratic muse and remain in the game despite never having had a breakthrough commercial success. Rudolph's dialogue has a snappy, flirtatious quality, and his distinctive "pan-and-zoom" style allows audiences to experience performances that are not built from cut to cut. It is not unusual for a Rudolph film to contain four or five shots that are as long as six or seven minutes, unheard of in this era of high-tech editing. Actors who like working with him because he lets them get into real-life rhythms wave their usual salaries, enabling him to adhere to ridiculously low budgets, and he frequently reteams with his talent, knowing that subsequent collaborations will only be richer.

The son of director Oscar Rudolph, writer-director Alan Rudolph followed in the footsteps of mentor Robert Altman, embracing a similar kind of ensemble picture while pursuing his own personal, less satiric, more human vision. Despised by mainstream Hollywood, he has managed to stay true to his idiosyncratic muse and remain in the game despite never having had a breakthrough commercial success. Rudolph's dialogue has a snappy, flirtatious quality, and his distinctive "pan-and-zoom" style allows audiences to experience performances that are not built from cut to cut. It is not unusual for a Rudolph film to contain four or five shots that are as long as six or seven minutes, unheard of in this era of high-tech editing. Actors who like working with him because he lets them get into real-life rhythms wave their usual salaries, enabling him to adhere to ridiculously low budgets, and he frequently reteams with his talent, knowing that subsequent collaborations will only be richer.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
2.
  Investigating Sex (2001) Director
3.
  Trixie (2000) Director
4.
  Breakfast of Champions (1999) Director
5.
  Afterglow (1997) Director
7.
  Equinox (1992) Director
8.
  Mortal Thoughts (1991) Director
9.
  Love At Large (1990) Director
10.
  Moderns, The (1988) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Who Is Henry Jaglom? (1995) Himself
2.
 The Player (1992) Himself
3.
 Hollywood Mavericks (1990) Himself
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1954:
First film appearance, "Rocket Man", directed by his father Oscar Rudolph
:
Given a camera by his older brother; made over 200 short films
:
Worked at odd jobs for various Hollywood studios
1967:
Entered Directors Guild of America assistant director's training program
1972:
First film as director, screenwriter and co-producer, "Premonition", executive produced by his father
1973:
First collaboration with Robert Altman, as an assistant director on "The Long Goodbye"; would also assist Altman on "California Split" (1974) and "Nashville" (1975)
1976:
First film as director to achieve significant theatrical release, "Welcome to L.A."; also wrote screenplay; produced by Altman; inaugurated collaborations with actors Keith Carradine and Geraldine Chaplin, though he knew both from working on Altman films
1976:
With Altman, co-wrote the screenplay for "Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull's History Lesson"
1978:
Provided stunning vehicle for Geraldine Chaplin as a woman returning from prison bent on disrupting her ex-husband's life in "Remember My Name", produced by Altman; there were only six prints of the movie, of which reportedly none are extant
1980:
First film with producer Carolyn Pfeiffer and first film as director-for-hire, "Roadie"
1982:
Helmed and co-wrote (with John Binder) "Endangered Species", a conspiracy thriller inspired by real-life cattle mutilations in the Midwest
1983:
Directed the feature-length documentary, "Return Engagement", featuring Timothy Leary and G Gordon Liddy
1984:
Scored critically with "Choose Me", an evocative use of L.A. locations starring Genevieve Bujold, Carradine and Lesley Ann Warren; also wrote and directed that year's "Songwriter" (first film with Kris Kristofferson), starring Willie Nelson
1985:
Set his noirish melodrama "Trouble in Mind" in the not-to-distant future; picture reteamed him with Kristofferson, playing an idealistic ex-cop fresh from a stint in jail; cast also included Carradine and Bujold; first collaboration with director of photography Toyomichi Kurita
1987:
Helmed the misfire about reincarnation, "Made in Heaven"
1988:
Recovered his director's aplomb for "The Moderns", a strikingly visual look at 1920s Paris of the Lost Generation; originally set to shoot picture in late 1970s with Mick Jagger in the role eventually played by John Lone; sixth and last film produced by Pfeiffer (the last four with producing partner David Blocker); featured Kevin O'Connor (in first of three turns for Rudolph) as the best-ever Ernest Hemingway on screen; second film with Kurita; last film to date with Chaplin
1990:
Appeared as himself in the documentary feature "Hollywood Mavericks"
1991:
First collaboration with actors Bruce Willis and Glenne Headly, "Mortal Thoughts", co-produced by Demi Moore (who also acted); hired the day before shooting commenced, delivered arguably his most mainstream entertainment, though Columbia, which purchased it after the success of "Ghost" (Moore) and "Die Hard II" (Willis), hated it and wanted to reshoot it so that the pair had a love story; both Willis and Moore stood behind the version as filmed
1992:
Appeared as himself in Altman's "The Player"
1994:
Provided a nice look into the world of the Algonquin Hotel's Round Table of writers with "Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle", produced by Altman; Carradine, in his fifth film for the director, portrayed Will Rogers; the director's first foray into a fact-based reality
1997:
First collaboration with actor Nick Nolte (though both appeared as themselves in "The Player"), "Afterglow", produced by Altman; reteamed with Kurita; picture cost less to make than Nolte's regular Hollywood salary
1999:
Did his best to capture the grandness of Kurt Vonnegut's satiric vision of American greed and commercialism in "Breakfast of Champions"; had originally written screenplay for Altman shortly after novel's publication in 1973; picture reteamed him with Nolte, Willis and Headly; produced by Blocker and Willis' brother David; six-week shoot was director's shortest schedule since "Choose Me"
2000:
Reunited with Nolte for "Trixie", produced by Altman; first film with Lesley Ann Warren in 16 years
2001:
Helmed "Speaking of Sex"
:
Directed "The Secret Lives of Dentists" (lensed 2002)
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University of California at Los Angeles: Los Angeles , California -
Assistant Directors Training Program, Directors Guild of America: Los Angeles , California - 1967

Notes

Named by the 1985 Toronto Film Festival as one of ten filmmakers whose work would shape the next decade of cinema. He was the only American on the list.

Rudolph credits TV directors Joseph Sargent and Leo Penn as inspirations: "They had a sense of romance that I had hoped I would get from directors, but which I found from no one else until I worked with [Robert] Altman." --From DGA News, October-November 1994.

About working for studios: "I've been asked to do quite a few things, and the money was always interesting, but I didn't think I could do it or work with certain people. I might have if I hadn't had such bad experiences with some of my earlier films [as a studio hire], which I came out of with a brutal reminder of how something wonderful can be destroyed. I would think I made a pretty good movie and then all the knives would start flashing and what came out the other end was a film that wasn't anyone's vision.

"The thing with those films is that I was always broke. Every time I'd do something for the studios, there would be a paycheck which was more than I'd ever experienced. I was literally checkerboarding my way through the rent. I'd go broke and then do a picture for a studio to pay the rent. But it wasn't worth it, I could see that. No matter how often you play Faust, you're going to get a bad review some way." --Alan Rudolph to in DGA News, October-November 1994.

"I don't have much knowledge in anything else, so I've basically been making the same film for 20 years. It's very fertile ground, and I just seem interested in the dance that people do together when they don't know the music and they don't know the steps. I'm always interested in taking a stab at this love thing, which just seems endless.'

"A lot of people resist my movies, they really don't like them. I really couldn't figure it out until I began to understand that my films require the audience's participation on an emotional level. You have to basically bring yourself, and a lot of people won't do that.

"The point isn't to strive to be original. My movies aren't made for mass audiences, and I guess I'm not really interested in mass audiences. The masses will take care of themselves. I'm interested in the individual in the audience." --to Boston Globe, January 1, 1998.

"I tell you what, movies have become currency. It's that good news, bad news thing. The good news is that you can make a movie just about anywhere with anyone for any amount of money, and someone might pay attention. The bad news is that everything's been co-opted. The so-called independent movement is basically a label and a sales pitch. All the independent distributors are owned by the major studios, which means its stuff for one decimal point less. I think filmmakers are in the best and worst of times right now. They should be encouraged to be original and true, but that's not what's happening." --Rudolph quoted in Chicago Tribune, January 23, 1998.

"The truth is, the first film I made with real actors, 'Welcome to L.A.', was the most audacious film I'll ever make, because I didn't know the difference. I had written the script for [Robert Altman's] 'Buffalo Bill and the Indians'. 'Buffalo Bill' was at the time a pretty high-budget film, maybe $7 million. Had Paul Newman, all that. So we're in Calgary, the day before shooting, and all those terrific United Artists guys like Arthur Krim and Eric Pleskow fly up to have a big production meeting with Bob. He wants me to be in on the meeting. Bob's sitting there and says, 'OK, let's make a proposition. Our picture costs $7 million. For less than $1 million more, we'll make another movie. Alan will write and direct, and we'll get a lot of stars.' They say OK Later, Bob said, 'Hey, you better write something.' So I made 'Welcome to L.A.'. It wasn't conventional, but I had no frame of reference." --quoted in Filmmaker, Winter 1998.

"No one has ever come up to me and asked, 'what do you want to do next?' If I stopped generating [projects] myself, I would just be another statistic." --Rudolph quoted in Screen International, November 14-November 20, 1997.

"One of the greatest rejections I ever got was when a foolish agent thought he could send 'Afterglow' to a studio, and the studio guy turned down the script. He said, 'We don't want to make this, it's just about people.' The real truth is I know my films are never going to cost very much money because I can't get very much money to do them, so I restrict the scope before I start writing. On 'Choose me' I was the mouse on the rotating wheel for a new company, Island Alive, and I'd just done a documentary for them, 'Return Engagement', that had worked out. They said, 'That was good, let's do another one.' And I said, 'I want to do a real movie.' I wish I had the napkin, because it was truly a napkin deal. I was sitting there with Chris Blackwell and Carolyn Pfeiffer and they said, 'How much would a movie cost?' And I figured out we could do it for $639,000. They said, 'OK, that's the budget." --quoted in Sight and Sound, June 1998.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Joyce Rudolph. Photographer.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Oscar Rudolph. Director, actor. Began acting in films as a teenager; directed primarily for TV; early work tended towards drama (i.e., "The Lone Ranger" ABC, "Playhouse 90" CBS); later specialized in sitcoms like "McHale's Navy" (ABC), "My Favorite Martian" (CBS) and "The Brady Bunch" (NBC); also directed such feature films as "Rocket Man" (1954), "Twist Around the Clock" (1961) and "The Wild Westerners" (1962).

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