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Russell Rouse

Russell Rouse

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Also Known As: Died: October 2, 1987
Born: Cause of Death: heart failure and complications from a stroke
Birth Place: New York City, New York, USA Profession: screenwriter

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Son of a New York-based assistant director, Edwin Russell, Rouse worked his way up from laborer and assorted low level studio jobs in Hollywood to screenwriter, director and producer with collaborator Clarence Greene. Rouse reputedly worked first as an uncredited screenwriter before writing the offbeat film noir, "D.O.A" (1950) and winning an Oscar for his original story for "Pillow Talk" (1959). Rouse's films are notable for their offbeat gimmicks: in "D.O.A" a man, dying from a slow-acting poison must find his own murderer before the poison kills him; his directorial debut, "The Well" (1951) which deals with mob psychology and racism has a black child trapped down a well as the only person who can save a suspect from being hanged; and "The Thief" (1952) is a spy film made completely without dialogue. Rouse also directed the more conventional "New York Confidential" (1955), "A House is Not a Home" (1964) and "The Oscar" (1966).

Son of a New York-based assistant director, Edwin Russell, Rouse worked his way up from laborer and assorted low level studio jobs in Hollywood to screenwriter, director and producer with collaborator Clarence Greene. Rouse reputedly worked first as an uncredited screenwriter before writing the offbeat film noir, "D.O.A" (1950) and winning an Oscar for his original story for "Pillow Talk" (1959). Rouse's films are notable for their offbeat gimmicks: in "D.O.A" a man, dying from a slow-acting poison must find his own murderer before the poison kills him; his directorial debut, "The Well" (1951) which deals with mob psychology and racism has a black child trapped down a well as the only person who can save a suspect from being hanged; and "The Thief" (1952) is a spy film made completely without dialogue. Rouse also directed the more conventional "New York Confidential" (1955), "A House is Not a Home" (1964) and "The Oscar" (1966).

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
2.
  The Oscar (1966) Director
3.
  A House Is Not a Home (1964) Director
4.
  Thunder in the Sun (1959) Director
5.
  House of Numbers (1957) Director
6.
  The Fastest Gun Alive (1956) Director
7.
  New York Confidential (1955) Director
8.
  Wicked Woman (1954) Director
9.
  The Thief (1952) Director
10.
  The Well (1951) Director

CAST: (feature film)

VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Worked at Paramount as laborer, then in prop department
:
Joined MGM as script messenger
:
Worked as uncredited freelance screenwriter with collaborator Clarence Greene until 1942
1950:
Formed Greene-Rouse Productions with Clarence Greene (date approximate)
1951:
Feature film co-directing debut, "The Well" (with Leo C. Popkin)
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Education

University of California at Los Angeles: Los Angeles , California -

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Beverly Michaels. Actor.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Edwin Russell. Assistant director. Worked on early New York films.

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