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Francesco Rosi

Francesco Rosi

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Salvatore Giuliano: The Criterion... Francesco Rosi's "Salvatore Giuliano" (1961) is a documentary-style Italian... more info $39.95was $39.95 Buy Now

Hands Over The City: The Criterion... Rod Steiger's iron fist is about to come down on Naples in this cinema verite... more info $39.95was $39.95 Buy Now

Christ Stopped At Eboli... Oftentimes people who appear to have nothing are truly rich when it comes to... more info $29.95was $29.95 Buy Now



Also Known As: Died:
Born: November 15, 1922 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Italy Profession: director, screenwriter, radio reporter, print illustrator, assistant director

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Leading figure in political cinema of the 1960s who began his film career as an assistant (along with Franco Zeffirelli) on Visconti's "La Terra Trema" (1948). Rosi then worked in a similar capacity for figures such as Antonioni and Monicelli, and contributed to the scripts of several films, before taking over the direction of "Red Shirts" (1952) after Goffredo Alessandrini had quit the project.Rosi made a solid, if unexceptional, solo directing debut with the Neapolitan gangster film, "The Challenge" (1958), but landed squarely in the international spotlight with 1961's "Salvatore Guiliano". The film is an oblique, quasi-documentary account of a real-life Sicilian bandit, told largely in flashbacks and featuring, in true neorealist style, a non-professional cast shot almost entirely on location. It earned critical plaudits, including the Silver Bear at Berlin, and stirred considerable controversy for pointing out--as have several of Rosi's films--the explicit links between Mafia and state. The director continued in a similar vein with "Hands Over the City" (1963), a powerful expose of corrupt real-estate developers, and "The Moment of Truth" (1965), an indictment of exploitation in the world of...

Leading figure in political cinema of the 1960s who began his film career as an assistant (along with Franco Zeffirelli) on Visconti's "La Terra Trema" (1948). Rosi then worked in a similar capacity for figures such as Antonioni and Monicelli, and contributed to the scripts of several films, before taking over the direction of "Red Shirts" (1952) after Goffredo Alessandrini had quit the project.

Rosi made a solid, if unexceptional, solo directing debut with the Neapolitan gangster film, "The Challenge" (1958), but landed squarely in the international spotlight with 1961's "Salvatore Guiliano". The film is an oblique, quasi-documentary account of a real-life Sicilian bandit, told largely in flashbacks and featuring, in true neorealist style, a non-professional cast shot almost entirely on location. It earned critical plaudits, including the Silver Bear at Berlin, and stirred considerable controversy for pointing out--as have several of Rosi's films--the explicit links between Mafia and state. The director continued in a similar vein with "Hands Over the City" (1963), a powerful expose of corrupt real-estate developers, and "The Moment of Truth" (1965), an indictment of exploitation in the world of bull-fighting.

Rosi began to shed the journalistic elements of his style in films such as "Lucky Luciano" (1973) and "Illustrious Corpses" (1976), two visually polished dramas which use the conventions of the gangster and thriller genres to paint searing portraits of institutional and political corruption. (In this respect, his work bears fruitful comparison with that of his countryman, Elio Petri.)

The director's subsequent work has been generally mellower in tone and more leisurely paced. "Christ Stopped at Eboli" (1979) and "Chronicle of a Death Foretold" (1987) were both adapted from literary sources and star Gian Maria Volonte. The first is a lyrical account of writer Carlo Levi's Fascist-imposed exile in a primitive southern village in the 1930s; the second is a beautifully shot but somewhat static adaptation of the best-selling novel by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. "Carmen" (1984) is a relatively faithful, visually sumptuous translation of Bizet's opera to the screen.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Truce, The (1997) Director
2.
  Palermo Connection, The (1991) Director
3.
4.
  Tre fratelli, I (1987) Director
5.
  Bizet's Carmen (1984) Director
6.
7.
  Context, The (1976) Director
8.
  Lucky Luciano (1973) Director
9.
  Mattei Affair, The (1972) Director
10.
  Senso (1968) Assistant Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Words In Progress (2004) Himself
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Milestones close milestones

1944:
Actor, writer and director for Radio Naples
1946:
Moved to Rome as assistant director of Theater Quirino
1948:
Hired by Visconti as assistant director on "The Earth Trembles"
1951:
Co-screenwriter of Luciano Emmer's "Parigi e sempre parigi"
1952:
Completed direction of "Red Shirts" after original director, Goffredo Alessandrini, quit
1956:
Technical director and co-adaptor of Vittorio Gassman's "Kean"
1958:
First film as solo director, "The Challenge"
1972:
Helmed the award-winning "The Mattei Affair"
1981:
Directed the Oscar-nominated foreign language film "Three Brothers"
1984:
Helmed "Carmen", an adaptation of Bizet's opera
1990:
Was director of the action film "The Palermo Connection"
1996:
Released "The Truce" after spending ten years making the film
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