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Leonard Rosenman

Leonard Rosenman

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Also Known As: Died: March 4, 2007
Born: September 7, 1924 Cause of Death: heart attack
Birth Place: Brooklyn, New York, USA Profession: composer, teacher, conductor, painter

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Leonard Rosenman made quite a career for himself as an Academy Award-winning musician. Rosenman began his entertainment career with his music featured in films like the dramatic adaptation "East of Eden" (1955) with Julie Harris, "The Cobweb" (1955) with Richard Widmark and the drama "Rebel Without a Cause" (1955) with James Dean. His music also appeared in the Alan Ladd adaptation "The Big Land" (1957), the James MacArthur dramatic adaptation "The Young Stranger" (1957) and the Natalie Wood romance "Bombers B-52" (1957). In the seventies, Rosenman's music continued to appear on the silver screen, including in films like the crime feature "The Todd Killings" (1971) with Robert F Lyons and "Battle For the Planet of the Apes" (1973). Rosenman won an Academy Award for "Barry Lyndon" in 1975 Rosenman's music was also featured in the dramatic adaptation "Promises in the Dark" (1979) with Marsha Mason, the sci-fi feature "Prophecy" (1979) with Talia Shire and the James Caan drama "Hide in Plain Sight" (1980). His music was also featured in the Neil Diamond adaptation "The Jazz Singer" (1980) and the drama "Making Love" (1982) with Michael Ontkean. Rosenman was most recently credited in the Ben...

Leonard Rosenman made quite a career for himself as an Academy Award-winning musician. Rosenman began his entertainment career with his music featured in films like the dramatic adaptation "East of Eden" (1955) with Julie Harris, "The Cobweb" (1955) with Richard Widmark and the drama "Rebel Without a Cause" (1955) with James Dean. His music also appeared in the Alan Ladd adaptation "The Big Land" (1957), the James MacArthur dramatic adaptation "The Young Stranger" (1957) and the Natalie Wood romance "Bombers B-52" (1957). In the seventies, Rosenman's music continued to appear on the silver screen, including in films like the crime feature "The Todd Killings" (1971) with Robert F Lyons and "Battle For the Planet of the Apes" (1973). Rosenman won an Academy Award for "Barry Lyndon" in 1975 Rosenman's music was also featured in the dramatic adaptation "Promises in the Dark" (1979) with Marsha Mason, the sci-fi feature "Prophecy" (1979) with Talia Shire and the James Caan drama "Hide in Plain Sight" (1980). His music was also featured in the Neil Diamond adaptation "The Jazz Singer" (1980) and the drama "Making Love" (1982) with Michael Ontkean. Rosenman was most recently credited in the Ben Affleck blockbuster dramatic adaptation "Argo" (2012). Rosenman was married to Kay Scott. Rosenman passed away in March 2007 at the age of 83.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 James Dean: A Portrait (1995) Interviewee
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Milestones close milestones

:
Served with the US Army Air Force during WWII
1955:
Film scoring debut, Kazan's "East of Eden", starring Dean
1955:
Composed the first atonal score for a Hollywood commercial film, Vincente Minelli's "The Cobweb"
1959:
Twisted an ancient Chinese melody into a sardonic commentary on war for "Porkchop Hill"
1962:
Conductor in Rome, Italy (dates approximate)
1966:
Returned to Hollywood, writing the quirky, dreamlike score for "Fantastic Voyage," his first film project in four years
1970:
Distorted old hymns to create the unsettling brutal world of "Beneath the Planet of the Apes"; also returned for "Battle for the Planet of the Apes" (1973), the last of the series
1970:
Scored "A Man Called Horse"
1975:
Won his first Oscar for adapting period music for Stanley Kubrick's "Barry Lyndon"
1976:
Brought home a second Oscar for "Bound for Glory" and an Emmy for "Sybil" (NBC)
1978:
Scored "The Lord of the Rings"
1979:
Received a second Emmy for "Friendly Fire" (ABC)
1983:
Earned an Oscar nomination for score of "Cross Creek"
1986:
Fourth and final (to date) Oscar nomination, "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home"
1990:
Scored Michael Landon's TV movie "Where Pigeons Go to Die"
1995:
Provided music for the CBS movie "The Face on the Milk Carton"
1997:
First feature film score in six years, "Levitation"
1997:
World premiere of his Violin Concerto No 2 with the American Composers Orchestra and violinist Elmar Oliveira
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Education

University of California at Berkeley: Berkeley , California -

Notes

Rosenman has conducted the Los Angeles Philharmonic, London Symphony, Orchestra of RAI, Santa Cecelia Orchestra and Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra. He has taught and been a guest lecturer at the University of Southern California, California Institute of the Arts, University of Illinois, University of California at Berkeley, UCLA, University of Massachusettes, Mount Holyoke College, Smith College, Claremont College, Harvard University, New School in New York and Yale University.

Awarded an honorary Doctorate of Philosophy by John F Kennedy University, Orinda, CA

On why James Dean picked him as a piano teacher: "I think what he really wanted was to get close to me. For some reason he just admired me enormously. He treated me almost like I was his father, even though I was only a few years older than he was. I remember one time he said, 'Let's go out and play some basketball.' I said, 'I'm writing.' He kept saying, 'Let's go out and play basketball.' I asked him why he wanted me to play basketball with him so badly. He said, 'You know, it's like when you really want your father to play ball with you.' I said. 'I'm not your father. Your father is still alive. Why don't you call your father?' If I read a book on philosophy, he'd carry the book around and make people believe he was reading it. It was sweet, because at the time all the admiration he was getting from the public was for the things he didn't like about himself. He really wanted to be an intellectual." --Leonard Rosenman to Time Out New York, May 8-15, 1997.

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