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Jan Roelfs

Jan Roelfs

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Also Known As: Died:
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Birth Place: Netherlands Profession: production designer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A gifted Dutch production designer, Jan Roelfs is noted for his decade-long collaboration with fellow designer Ben Von Os. Beginning in 1983, the pair collaborated on over 25 films, most notably several for British director Peter Greenaway, including "A Zed and Two Noughts" (1985), "Drowning By Numbers" (1988), "The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover" (1989) and "Prospero's Books" (1991). For each of those films, Roelfs and Van Os worked closely with the director, choosing particular color schemes and creating the ornate and sumptuous visuals. They also scored with Robert Altman's "Vincent & Theo" (1990), which included many recreations of Van Gogh's paintings. For "Orlando" (1993), which required creating sets for several time periods ranging from the Elizabethan age to the 18th Century to modern times, the duo shared an Oscar nomination for Best Art Direction-Set Decoration. Beginning in 1994, the pair began to accept projects independently. Roelfs went on to create the Americana look for Gillian Armstrong's remake of "Little Women" (1995) and earned a second Academy Award nomination for his futuristic design for "Gattaca" (1997).

A gifted Dutch production designer, Jan Roelfs is noted for his decade-long collaboration with fellow designer Ben Von Os. Beginning in 1983, the pair collaborated on over 25 films, most notably several for British director Peter Greenaway, including "A Zed and Two Noughts" (1985), "Drowning By Numbers" (1988), "The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover" (1989) and "Prospero's Books" (1991). For each of those films, Roelfs and Van Os worked closely with the director, choosing particular color schemes and creating the ornate and sumptuous visuals. They also scored with Robert Altman's "Vincent & Theo" (1990), which included many recreations of Van Gogh's paintings. For "Orlando" (1993), which required creating sets for several time periods ranging from the Elizabethan age to the 18th Century to modern times, the duo shared an Oscar nomination for Best Art Direction-Set Decoration. Beginning in 1994, the pair began to accept projects independently. Roelfs went on to create the Americana look for Gillian Armstrong's remake of "Little Women" (1995) and earned a second Academy Award nomination for his futuristic design for "Gattaca" (1997).

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

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:
Trained to be an interior designer
1984:
First worked with Ben Von Os on "Naughty Boys"
1985:
First garnered attention with his production design for "A Zed and Two Naughts", directed by Peter Greenaway
1988:
Designed Greenaway's "Drowning By Numbers"
1989:
Third film with Greenaway, "The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover"
1990:
Served as one of the art directors for Robert Altman's "Vincent & Theo"
1991:
Teamed again with Greenaway for "Prospero's Books"
1993:
Garnered Oscar nomination for his work on "Orlando"
1994:
Was production designer on Gillian Armstrong's remake of "Little Women"
1997:
Received second Academy Award nomination for his futuristic designs for "Gattaca"
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Notes

"I'd like to make movies where you do not clearly notice the art direction, While sometimes it's nice when they write about it, over the last couple of years we've had reviews that read, 'Well the movie wasn't so good, but the art direction was beautiful.' I would prefer that they wrote about the movie and not about the art direction at all, because that's what we're hired for: to make a movie, not to make an exhibition or something." --Jan Roelfs to THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER, 1994

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