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Also Known As: Gerald Miguel Rivera Died:
Born: July 4, 1943 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: New York City, New York, USA Profession: producer, investigative reporter, TV host, documentary writer, actor, newspaper owner, merchant marine, Latino activist, lawyer, men's clothing salesman

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Passionate, pandering, ambitious or simply self-serving - all have been used at one time or another to describe the controversial career of broadcast journalist Geraldo Rivera. Emerging from a legal background and Hispanic activism in the late-1960s, the charismatic Rivera began reporting for New York's WABC-TV in 1970, where an investigation into the horrendous conditions at a local institution for the mentally disabled won him a Peabody Award and national attention. Laudable correspondent work for programs like "20/20" (ABC, 1978- ) made him a rising star in the world of television news. When the humiliating failure of his live special "The Mystery of Al Capone's Vault" (syndicated, 1986) made him a journalistic punch line, his career seemed all but over. Instead, Rivera embraced the sensationalistic approach more firmly than ever with his tabloid-driven daytime talk show "Geraldo" (syndicated, 1987-1998). Pioneering the realm of "Trash TV," Rivera's salaciously-themed episodes paved the way for the likes of Jenny Jones and Jerry Springer. Later attempts to reestablish himself as a serious journalist with such cable outlets as CNBC and Fox News Channel met with a mix of skepticism and curiosity....

Passionate, pandering, ambitious or simply self-serving - all have been used at one time or another to describe the controversial career of broadcast journalist Geraldo Rivera. Emerging from a legal background and Hispanic activism in the late-1960s, the charismatic Rivera began reporting for New York's WABC-TV in 1970, where an investigation into the horrendous conditions at a local institution for the mentally disabled won him a Peabody Award and national attention. Laudable correspondent work for programs like "20/20" (ABC, 1978- ) made him a rising star in the world of television news. When the humiliating failure of his live special "The Mystery of Al Capone's Vault" (syndicated, 1986) made him a journalistic punch line, his career seemed all but over. Instead, Rivera embraced the sensationalistic approach more firmly than ever with his tabloid-driven daytime talk show "Geraldo" (syndicated, 1987-1998). Pioneering the realm of "Trash TV," Rivera's salaciously-themed episodes paved the way for the likes of Jenny Jones and Jerry Springer. Later attempts to reestablish himself as a serious journalist with such cable outlets as CNBC and Fox News Channel met with a mix of skepticism and curiosity. Never far from controversy, Rivera continued to raise eyebrows with incidents like his infamous "map in the sand" interview from Iraq, during which he revealed potentially sensitive information about ongoing U.S. Military operations. Boasting a career filled with impressive journalistic highs and embarrassing lows, Rivera defied the expectations of many critics by remaining a consistent media presence for more than four decades.

Born Gerald Michael Rivera on July 4, 1943 in Brooklyn, NY, he was the son of Puerto Rican immigrant, Cruz Allen Rivera, and Lillian Friedman, a woman of Russian-Jewish descent. Growing up in the NYC neighborhoods of Brooklyn and West Babylon, he was raised "mostly Jewish," in his words, despite his father's Hispanic heritage. After graduating high school, Rivera attended New York's Maritime College for two years before enrolling as an undergrad at the University of Arizona, from which he graduated in 1965. Keenly interested in the law, he worked for a period as an investigator with the New York City Police Department, then earned his J.D. from Brooklyn Law School in 1969 and did some post-graduate work at the University of Pennsylvania that same year. Working as a lawyer for the Latino activist group known as the Young Lords in 1970, Rivera was interviewed by a local news station during the group's occupation of an East Harlem church. With his urban good looks, verbal acumen and obvious passion, Rivera was noticed by station manager Al Primo, who was looking for a Latino reporter for WABC-TV's news team. After agreeing to change Gerald to the more ethnic Geraldo, Rivera officially began his career in broadcast journalism.

Ambitious and energetic, Rivera garnered national attention with his Peabody Award-winning exposé on the neglect and abuse endured by mentally handicapped patients at Staten Island's Willowbrook State School in 1972. After a few more years with WABC, Rivera hosted the news program "Good Night, America" (ABC, 1974-77), where he exclusively aired the first showing of the controversial Zapruder Film in 1975, giving the public at large its first glimpse of the grisly Kennedy assassination footage. He gained further notoriety in 1977 after the sudden death of Elvis Presley, whose demise had been erroneously attributed to a heart attack. Rivera's investigation into Presley's drug prescription records not only led to revealing the true cause of the King's death, but to the revocation of Presley's personal physician's medical license in Tennessee for overprescribing. Before long, Rivera was working as a frequent correspondent for such new programs as "Good Morning, America" (ABC, 1975- ) and "20/20" (ABC, 1978- ). His rising star faltered in 1985, after Rivera publicly criticized "20/20" creator-producer Roone Arledge for refusing to air a report on the relationships between Marilyn Monroe, President Kennedy and his brother, Robert Kennedy. Not pleased with the accusations of personal bias and conflicts of interest, Arledge unceremoniously fired Rivera as a correspondent.

Rivera wasted no time in orchestrating his comeback. A year later, the heavily-hyped special "The Mystery of Al Capone's Vault" (syndicated, 1986) was broadcast live to a record-setting number of riveted viewers across the country. Cutting into regularly scheduled programming, Rivera breathlessly speculated about what might be hidden within the infamous mobster's bricked-over hiding place underneath Chicago's Lexington Hotel, one of Capone's known headquarters. Accompanied by medical examiners (in case a body was found) and representatives from the IRS (in the event of unreported loot being discovered), a disappointed and humiliated Rivera was left sifting through meaningless debris and a few empty bottles that he attempted to imbue with significance by claiming that they had once contained "moonshine bathtub gin." Despite the laughable anti-climax of the event, it became the highest-rated syndicated special ever aired at the time, and led not to the end of Rivera's career, but to its new beginning.

Rivera embarked on the next phase of his career the following year when he launched the daytime talk show "Geraldo" (syndicated, 1987-1998). Lurid and theatrical from its inception, Rivera's confrontational, provocative hosting style, combined with salaciously themed episodes, earned the program the dubious characterization of "Trash TV" by the end of its first season. Rivera further solidified his reputation as a sensational muckraker with his investigations, both on his show and in several primetime specials, into the supposed proliferation of satanic cults and ritual abuse throughout America. Most infamous, however, was an incident in a 1988 episode of "Geraldo" on which an extremely violent melee broke out between Rivera's guests, comprised of representatives from various white-supremacists, anti-racists, and African-American and Jewish activists. During the altercation - in which punches were thrown by nearly everyone involved, including Rivera - the host was hit in the face with a chair, resulting in a broken nose. It also gave him some of the highest ratings of his career, with buzz building about the incident even before the episode had aired. The notoriety came at a price, though, and for many, Rivera's reputation as a serious journalist had been irreversibly damaged by the embarrassing fiasco.

Attempting a course correction in 1996, Rivera gave the show a more subdued, serious tone and changed the name to "The Geraldo Rivera Show" to reflect this new direction. Apparently, the newfound move toward respectability failed to sway audiences. In 1998, the program was canceled. While still serving as the host of "Geraldo" he also began anchoring "Rivera Live" (CNBC, 1994-2002), a more journalistic endeavor on which he examined legal-political scandals of the day like the O.J. Simpson murder trial and the impeachment proceedings against President Bill Clinton. And while Rivera's articulate dissection of the issues and astute legal analysis reminded viewers of his background as an attorney and activist, his brash, self-referential and confrontational onscreen manner did little to alter the tabloid TV persona he had become so deeply associated with. Shortly after the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001, Rivera joined Fox News as a war correspondent, traveling to Afghanistan for frontline reports. He attracted negative attention and the ire of the U.S. Military in the spring of 2003 when during a televised interview from Iraq, he began to discuss an upcoming military operation, even going so far as to illustrate their current position by drawing a map in the sand. Saying that Rivera's report had compromised "operational security," officials from Central Command insisted that the journalist leave the country and continue his reports from Kuwait.

That same year, Rivera left CNBC to anchor another program at his new network home with "Geraldo at Large" (Fox News Channel/syndication, 2003- ). In the years that followed, Rivera could be seen providing sensationalistic coverage on Fox News for such events as Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and promoting more personal efforts, like his fifth non-fiction book HisPanic: Why Americans Fear Hispanics in the U.S. in 2008. Clearly enjoying another journalistic scoop, Rivera was the first to break the news that Osama Bin Laden had been killed by U.S. Special Forces during an airing of "At Large" on May 1, 2011. Later, an elated Rivera would state that the moment had been the highlight of his storied career. In October of that year, Rivera and his camera crew were literally booed away from covering New York's Occupy Wall Street protests with endless chants of "Fox News lies!" In a far cry from his days as a left-leaning political activist, Rivera announced that he would be hosting a daily talk show on WABC Radio, the home of conservative media personality Rush Limbaugh and former sister station of WABC-TV, where Rivera had received his start in broadcast journalism more than 40 years earlier.

By Bryce Coleman

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 All About Steve (2009)
2.
 Grindhouse (2007)
4.
 Primary Colors (1998) Himself
5.
6.
 Contact (1997) Himself
8.
 Grumpier Old Men (1995) Himself
10.
 Bonfire Of The Vanities, The (1990) (Uncredited) Robert Corso
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Grew up in NYC and West Babylon, Long Island, NY, where both parents were working in the cafeteria of a defense contractor
:
Passed the bar exam for New York state after studying at Brooklyn College
1968:
Started legal career as a clerk with the Harlem Assertion of Rights Community Action for Legal Services
:
Was a spokesperson for a New York City Latino activist group called the Young Lords
:
Worked as a reporter for WABC-TV
1972:
Took a key given him by an angry doctor and sneaked a camera crew into Building 6, which housed the most severely handicapped patients of the Willowbrook School, a huge facility for the mentally retarded on New York's Staten Island; the footage revealing squalor analogous to Auschwitz and the unprecedented time to vent granted him by WABC made Geraldo a local star in NYC
:
Hosted series of late night TV programs, "Good Night, America" (ABC)
1975:
Secured the rights for the first television presentation of the Abraham Zapruder film of the assassination of President John F Kennedy on "Good Night, America" America" (ABC)
1975:
Began serving as a correspondent for the information series, "Good Morning, America"
1977:
Became a correspondent for ABC News
1978:
Joined the primetime news magazine "20/20" as a correspondent; among storied covered was a return to Willowbrook in 1982
:
Worked as a reporter for the syndicated nightly program, "Entertainment Tonight"
1985:
Fired from ABC for pushing "20/20" to air a story on John and Robert Kennedy's affairs with Marilyn Monroe and complaining bitterly (and publicly lambasting Roone Arledge who had been his biggest supporter) when it did not air; there was also an incident, involving his associate producer and future wife C C Dyer getting caught using an ABC messenger to make a marijuana delivery, which added additional fuel to Arledge's ire
1986:
First of nine syndicated two-hour primetime documentary specials, the mercilessly hyped "The Mystery of Al Capone's Vaults"; received a phenomenal 31.8 rating but was a monumental bust when the vaults yielded nothing
:
Hosted daily talk show, "Geraldo!", which became known as "The Geraldo Rivera Show" in September 1996; taped last broadcast in May 1998
1987:
Formed production company, the Investigative News Group (date approximate)
1988:
Rumbled (along with Congress of Racial Equality head Roy Innes) with neo-Nazis, suffering a broken nose from a flying chair; it has remained the single most memorable (infamous) event of his daytime talk show
1989:
Formed production company, Maravilla Productions, named after the Spanish word for "marvelous"
1991:
On March 1st, "Geraldo!" began airing in the former USSR via Soviet Channel 2 x 2, making it the first US television program scheduled on a daily basis by Soviet TV
:
Hosted and served as managing editor of the daily investigative magazine series, "Now It Can Be Told" (syndicated)
1992:
Played the role of Ted Mayne on the TV-movie, "Perry Mason: The Case of the Reckless Romeo" (NBC)
1993:
Opened the Broadcast Boxing Club, a fitness center in NYC
1994:
Launched "Rivera Live", a daily primetime show airing on CNBC; got tremendous mileage "worrying the O.J. bone" (an estimated 550 hours); also concentrated on what he called "Zippergate", the investigation of the relationship between US President Bill Clinton and White House intern Monica Lewinsky
1996:
Issued his personal "Bill of Rights and Responsibilities" and subsequently steered clear of the most egregiously sleazoid topics, carving out a little piece of high ground as America's investigator
1997:
Appeared as interviewee (along with Phil Donahue, Maury Povich and Morton Downey Jr) on "Talked to Death", an HBO "America Undercover" documentary revealing what goes on backstage at some tabloid TV shows, emphasizing the do-anything-for-ratings mentality
1997:
Traded in his syndicated talkshow for a bigger role in the NBC news division, signing a three-year contract worth an estimated $3 million annually; NBC exercised its right to negotiate the deal after Rivera had already accepted an offer to be an anchor on the Fox News Channel
1998:
Began contributing reports to NBC's "Today" show
1998:
Debuted half-hour nightly newscast "Upfront Tonight" on CNBC (September)
2001:
Switched to Fox News Channel in order to travel to Afghanistan in pursuit of Osama bin Laden; began airing the weekend show "At Large with Geraldo Rivera"
2005:
Began a weekday syndicated show, "Geraldo at Large"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

West Babylon High School: Babylon , New York -
State University of New York Maritime College: Bronx , New York -
New York City Community College of Applied Arts and Sciences: Brooklyn , New York -
University of Arizona: Tucson , Arizona - 1965
School of Law, Brooklyn College: Brooklyn , New York - 1969
School of Law, University of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania - 1969
School of Journalism, Columbia University: New York , New York - 1970

Notes

Through a mistake, his birth name was given as Gerald Riviera. He legally changed his surname in the 1960s when he was beginning his career.

Some sources list July 5 as Mr. Rivera's birthdate.

Rivera owned the Two Rivers Times newspaper in New Jersey and his wife C C Dyer was the publisher.

Rivera has received a number of daytime and special category Emmy Awards, the majority of which are regional awards. He has also received two Robert F. Kennedy Awards (1973 and 1975) and two Alfred I du Pont-Columbia University Citations. In addition, the New York State Associated Press named him Broadcaster of the Year in 1971, 1972 and 1974.

"Jerry Rivers" is less another name Rivera has used than one that has been associated with him. Some have claimed over the years that it is his real name, that he appropriated a more ethnic-sounding name merely to be fashionable. Rivera has always steadfastly stated that his current name is his birth name. His mother's attempts to Americanize it consisted only in dropping the "o" in Geraldo.

A sampler of criticism of Rivera could include such remarks as the following: "You know sensationalism is back in style . . . when Geraldo Rivera is riding high" (Richard Zoglin, Time); "His narcissism overwhelms his news sense" (Charles Leerhsen, Newsweek); "Geraldo Rivera should be arrested for exposing himself" (Reuven Frank, former president of NBC News) --all quoted in Los Angeles Times, March 5, 1989.

Responding to charges that he is sometimes too arrogant, Rivera responded in an interview in PLAYBOY in 1979: "I was definitely arrogant and pushy, but I was other things too . . . arrogance is definitely part of my life. My defense against criticism has always been arrogance. I would always answer my critics by saying, 'What do you know? When was the last time you were in the streets? What have you lived through? What have you seen?'"

Rivera has also noted that the criticism he weathers has its good side as well: "I've explained what I do so many times in as public a way as I can that my audience now EXPECTS people to say bad things about me. It keeps me in the position of being almost a perennial underdog." --quoted in Los Angeles Times, March 5, 1989.

Rivera promised a junior high school class that he would pay for their college education (c. 1987) upon graduation from high school. Five years later he payed for nine of the graduate's college educations (approximately $180,000 annually). He continues to actively encourage children to realize their dreams through education and has remained politically active as an advocate for children's and minority rights.

According to his 1991 autobiography, the aptly named "Exposing Myself"--a book he now refers to as "the colossal error of my adult life"--his life up until about 1987 was one long string of romance and debauchery and adventure. His policy, he wrote was to keep "one steady and one on the side," having flings, flirtations or affairs with--he claimed--the likes of Bette Midler, Liza Minnelli and Marian Javits, wife of late New York Sen. Jacob Javits, as well as nameless, and countless, production assistants, Studio 54 habitues, and groupies. Characterizing himself in the book as "a grunting, voracious pig in heat", Rivera bragged in a 1989 Playboy interview of having sex with "thousands of women, literally thousands. It's gaudy." In light of his confessed infidelities, it's little wonder his first three marriages failed.

About his monogamous relationship with fourth wife: "I'm a flirt but I'm not a fool. I play to an audience of one. If C C were ever to hear that I betrayed her, she would just say goodbye, and she's too valuable." --Rivera to People, March 17, 1997.

"What I really want is to be one of the wise men of my generation. I think I've earned it now. I want to be the Jennings, Brokaw, Rather person for a fourth entitiy, be it Fox or whoever. The old news format is dying. I want to conduct a show that would be rock & roll news for the millenium. And that will be my last job in broadcasting. I want one more hit." --Geraldo Rivera to Rolling Stone, September 18, 1997.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Linda Coblentz. First wife; met at the University of Arizona; married c. 1965, in part to avoid the draft; divorced.
wife:
Edith Bucket Vonnegut. Artist, fashion designer. Second wife; daughter of author Kurt Vonnegut Jr; married on December 14, 1971; divorced.
wife:
Sherryl Rivera. Producer. Third wife; married on December 31, 1976; divorced in 1984; had worked with Rivera at ABC-TV; mother of his oldest son.
wife:
C C Dyer. Producer, publisher. Fourth wife; born c. 1956; together from c. 1980; married in July 1987; publisher of the <i>Two River Times</i>, a local New Jersey weekly newspaper owned by husband; worked together on "20/20"; separated in September 1999; reconciled six-weeks later in November 1999; separated again in spring 2000; filed for divorce.
companion:
Erica Pressman. Publicist. Worked for Rivera's talk show.
companion:
Erica Levy. TV news producer. Born c. 1975; works at CNBC; married August 10, 2003.
VIEW COMPLETE COMPANION LISTING

Family close complete family listing

father:
Cruz Rivera. Kitchen supervisor, diner owner. Puerto Rican; changed first name to Alan when he converted to Judaism; married Rivera's mother in 1940; died on Thanksgiving 1987 of a heart attack.
mother:
Lillian Rivera. Waitress. Jewish.
sister:
Irene Hunt. Parochial school principal. Born c. 1941.
brother:
Wilfredo Rivera. Steamfitter. Older; a cousin adopted and raised by Rivera's family.
sister:
Sharon Rivera. Artist. Born c. 1947.
brother:
Craig Rivera. TV reporter. Younger; worked with Geraldo on "20/20"; also appeared on the syndicated nightly newsmagazine, "Inside Edition".
son:
Gabriel Miguel Rivera. Born in July 1979; mother, Sheri Rivera.
son:
Cruz. Born in 1987; born to a woman Rivera was briefly involved with before his marriage to C C Dyer; living with mother in Texas in 1997.
daughter:
Isabella Holmes Rivera. On born November 7, 1992; mother, C C Dyer.
daughter:
Simone Cruickshank Rivera. Born in September 1994; mother, C C Dyer.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Puerto Rico: Island of Contrast" Parents' Magazine Press
"Miguel Robles: So Far" Harcourt Brace Jovanovich
"A Special Kind of Courage: Profiles of Young Americans" Simon & Schuster
"Willowbrook"
"Exposing Myself" Bantam Books
VIEW COMPLETE BIBLIOGRAPHY

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