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Jack White

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Also Known As: Jack White Iii, John Anthony Gillis Died:
Born: July 9, 1975 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Detroit, Michigan, USA Profession:

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Musically rooted in blues, punk, and classic rock, Jack White captivated audiences worldwide with his undeniable talent and showmanship. As one-half of chart-topping band the White Stripes, White helped change the landscape of alternative rock music with the bandâ¿¿s critically acclaimed and commercially successful singles "Fell in Love with a Girl" (2001) and "Seven Nation Army" (2003). Along with musical partner -- and one-time wife -- Meg White, White created an innovative, genre-bending sound mixed with the bandâ¿¿s eccentric red-and-white stage outfits, and dazzling live performances. Throughout his career, White also produced music for other artists, acted in films like the Academy Award-winning Civil War drama "Cold Mountain" (2003), and fronted other music groups like The Raconteurs, doing all of it with the same amount of passion and dedication. After releasing a handful of albums and winning several Grammy Awards, the White Stripes announced they had officially ended in 2011. The bandâ¿¿s split marked the end of an era for Whiteâ¿¿s illustrious career, yet it also signified his well-deserved legacy as one of the most brilliant artists and dynamic performers in modern rock history.Jack White...

Musically rooted in blues, punk, and classic rock, Jack White captivated audiences worldwide with his undeniable talent and showmanship. As one-half of chart-topping band the White Stripes, White helped change the landscape of alternative rock music with the bandâ¿¿s critically acclaimed and commercially successful singles "Fell in Love with a Girl" (2001) and "Seven Nation Army" (2003). Along with musical partner -- and one-time wife -- Meg White, White created an innovative, genre-bending sound mixed with the bandâ¿¿s eccentric red-and-white stage outfits, and dazzling live performances. Throughout his career, White also produced music for other artists, acted in films like the Academy Award-winning Civil War drama "Cold Mountain" (2003), and fronted other music groups like The Raconteurs, doing all of it with the same amount of passion and dedication. After releasing a handful of albums and winning several Grammy Awards, the White Stripes announced they had officially ended in 2011. The bandâ¿¿s split marked the end of an era for Whiteâ¿¿s illustrious career, yet it also signified his well-deserved legacy as one of the most brilliant artists and dynamic performers in modern rock history.

Jack White was born John Anthony Gillis on July 9, 1975 in Detroit, MI. He was the youngest of 10 children, raised in a religious household. Both of his parents worked for the Archdiocese of Detroit and instilled their love of music in their children, especially White. The future music star began playing the drums at six, followed by mastering the guitar and piano shortly thereafter. White loved classical music as a child, but his taste shifted to blues and 1960s rock during his teens. At 17, White worked as an apprentice at an upholstery shop before opening his own shop, Third Man Upholstery, when he was 21. All the while, White continued to play with various bands on Detroitâ¿¿s garage rock music scene. In 1997, he met and married bartender Meg White, taking on her surname as his own. The couple formed the band The White Stripes, with Jack on guitar and vocals, and Meg, who had never played an instrument before, on drums.

The White Stripes signed with independent label Italy Records in 1998 and released their self-titled debut the following year. Their stripped-down rock sound and signature look â¿¿ wearing only red and white clothing while performing â¿¿ captivated indie rock fans hankering for musicâ¿¿s "next big thing." Although they were married to each other at the time, Jack and Meg often pretended to be siblings in press interviews. The couple divorced in 2000, the year their second album De Stijl was released. Having piqued the general publicâ¿¿s interest with its striking stage outfits and head-scratching relationship, the White Stripes released breakthrough third album White Blood Cells in 2001, breaking through to the rock mainstream with the manic single "Fell in Love with a Girl." Their follow-up release Elephant included the White Stripesâ¿¿ most commercially successful single, "Seven Nation Army," which topped the Billboard Hot Modern Rock Tracks chart and peaked at No. 76 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song earned the White Stripes a Grammy Award in 2004 for Best Rock Song, while Elephant won for Best Alternative Music Performance and was nominated for Album of the Year. The group went on to win more Grammy Awards in the Best Alternative Music Performance category with their subsequent albums Get Behind Me Satan (2005) and Icky Thump (2007).

Even while he was making music with Meg, White also took on several side projects. He produced the 2004 comeback album Van Lear Rose for country legend Loretta Lynn (whom the White Stripesâ¿¿ White Blood Cells was dedicated to), and collaborated with Alicia Keys on the song "Another Way to Die," which was released as the theme song to the James Bond film "Quantum of Solace" (2008). White also appeared in a handful of films throughout this period. In 2003, he landed a supporting role opposite Nicole Kidman, Jude Law, and then-girlfriend Renee Zellweger in the war drama "Cold Mountain." White played a Civil War-era mandolin player who catches the eye of Zellwegerâ¿¿s mountain-woman character. His other film credits include the Jim Jarmusch-directed drama "Coffee and Cigarettes" (2003) and the comedy faux-biopic "Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story" (2007), in which he played Elvis Presley.

Rumors of the White Stripes breaking up began swirling in 2005 after White formed another band, The Raconteurs, with Brendan Benson, Jack Lawrence, and Patrick Keeler. White and Benson co-wrote The Raconteursâ¿¿ first single "Steady, As She Goes" for the groupâ¿¿s 2006 debut Broken Boy Soldiers. White ditched the red and white outfits he donned for the White Stripes, and adopted a more natural, country-rock look with The Raconteurs. Broken Boy Soldiers received positive critical reviews, but its commercial performance paled in comparison to the White Stripesâ¿¿ success. The group charted better in the U.K., where the song "Steady, As She Goes" cracked the Top 10. The band released its second album Consolers of the Lonely in 2008. White formed yet another group called The Dead Weather in 2009, along with Raconteurs bassist Lawrence, Dean Fertita, and Alison Mosshart. The band released its debut album Horehound that year, which landed at No. 6 on the Billboard 200 chart. Having stopped touring in 2007 after Meg White began suffering from acute anxiety, the status of the White Stripes was under much speculation until the band officially announced on Feb. 2, 2011 that they had broken up. A live album and documentary feature about their final tour, "Under Great White Northern Lights," was released in 2010.

Having moved to Nashville with new wife Karen Elson, White turned his label, Third Man Records, into a multimedia empire including a record store and recording studio. Artists ranging from Neil Young, who recorded his 2014 album A Letter Home in White's vintage "make your own record" booth, to talk show host Conan O'Brien recorded in White's studio, while Third Man Records became known for its elaborate vinyl-only releases. White began his solo career with the album Blunderbuss (2012), followed by Lazaretto. Both achieved solid sales and positive critical attention.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

3.
 Shine a Light (2008)
4.
6.
 Fearless Freaks, The (2005) Cast
7.
 Cold Mountain (2003) Georgia
8.
 Coffee and Cigarettes (2003) Himself
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Milestones close milestones

1999:
The White Stripes release their self-titled debut album
2001:
The White Stripes sign to V2 Records, who re-release their breakthrough third album <i>White Blood Cells</i>
2006:
<i>Broken Boy Soldiers</i>, the debut album by the Raconteurs, is released.
2007:
Canadian and British tours are canceled due to Meg White's acute anxiety, and the White Stripes go on an extended hiatus, officially disbanding in 2011.
2009:
<i>Horehound</i>, the debut album by The Dead Weather, is released.
2012:
Jack White's debut solo album, <i>Blunderbuss</i>, is released.
2014:
Second solo album, <i>Lazaretto</i>, is released.
2015:
The Dead Weather's third album, "Dodge & Burn," announced for 2015 release.
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